Research and Technical Services

Australia

Research and Technical Services

Australia

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Mohammadi I.,Research and Technical Services | South W.,Research and Technical Services
Journal of Advanced Concrete Technology | Year: 2015

Following the publication of the Australian Standard AS 3972, "General purpose and blended (GP) cements" in 2010, a research programme was undertaken to determine the effect, if any, of increasing the maximum permissible mineral addition in Type GP cement. This paper involves the assessment of the variation in standard laboratory concrete properties due to increasing the limestone addition in cement. Workability, bleed water, compressive strength and drying shrinkage of concrete samples with different limestone contents in the range of 5% to 12% were examined. Based on the research results, it is recommended that the maximum allowable mineral addition in Type GP cement be increased from 7.5% to 12%.


Mohammadi I.,Research and Technical Services | South W.,Research and Technical Services
Materials and Structures/Materiaux et Constructions | Year: 2016

Subsequent to the publication of the Australian Standard AS 3972, “General purpose and blended (GP) cements” in 2010, it was decided to undertake a research programme to determine the effect, if any, of increasing the maximum allowable mineral addition in Type GP cement to 12 %. An increase in the mineral addition content will allow Australian cements to have a lower embodied energy and associated emissions. This summary paper discusses the assessment of high-strength concrete properties prepared by GP cement containing different contents of limestone in the range of 5–12 %. In addition, effects of changing limestone content on different types of concrete from constructional field were examined. The inferential analysis of results from fresh and hardened tests for high-strength concrete and construction field data revealed that increasing the limestone content of Type GP cement resulted in no significant change to most properties. It is recommended the maximum allowable mineral addition in Type GP of cement be increased to 12 %. © 2016 RILEM


Mohammadi J.,Research and Technical Services | South W.,Research and Technical Services
Construction and Building Materials | Year: 2016

This paper presents the results of a test program conducted to determine the effect of up to 12% limestone addition in cement on properties of concrete for durable applications. Cement samples with 5%, 7.5%, 10% and 12% limestone content were used and concretes were made with different binder combinations incorporating one or more of fly ash, slag and amorphous silica, applicable for durable applications. Fresh concrete properties including slump, air content, bleed and setting time were investigated and no adverse effects were found. Hardened properties examined included compressive strength, drying shrinkage, chloride resistance and volume of permeable voids. The results revealed a minor effect on concrete strength, though performance depended on the binder composition. Drying shrinkage of concrete was found to be similar for all concretes investigated. For mixes containing slag, chloride resistance was improved with increasing limestone content. © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


Faucette B.,Research and Technical Services
BioCycle | Year: 2010

Various research activities are aimed towards the use of compost to remove and remediate hydrocarbons for clean-up of the Gulf oil spill. A study conducted at the US Department of Agriculture's Agricultural Research Service reported compost filter socks removed between 43 and 99 percent of three types of commonly spilled hydrocarbons, motor oil, diesel and gasoline. The City of Chattanooga, Tennessee used compost filter socks to reduce oil and grease in storm water originating from a 5-acre parking lot in order to comply with their National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Stormwater Permit. In a study evaluating the degradation rates of petroleum in contaminated soils, those amended with compost exhibited degradation rates of 375 mg kg-1/day compared to only 40 mg kg-1/day without compost.

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