Decatur, GA, United States
Decatur, GA, United States

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Bradley J.M.,Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center | Islam K.N.,Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center | Polhemus D.J.,Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center | Donnarumma E.,Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center | And 6 more authors.
American Journal of Physiology - Heart and Circulatory Physiology | Year: 2015

Metabolic syndrome (MetS) reduces endothelial nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability and exacerbates vascular dysfunction in patients with preexisting vascular diseases. Nitrite, a storage form of NO, can mediate vascular function during pathological conditions when endogenous NO is reduced. The aims of the present study were to characterize the effects of severe MetS and obesity on dyslipidemia, myocardial oxidative stress, and endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) regulation in the obese Ossabaw swine (OS) model and to examine the effects of a novel, sustained-release formulation of sodium nitrite (SR-nitrite) on coronary vascular reactivity and myocardial redox status in obese OS subjected to critical limb ischemia (CLI). After 6 mo of an atherogenic diet, obese OS displayed a MetS phenotype. Obese OS had decreased eNOS functionality and NO bioavailability. In addition, obese OS exhibited increased oxidative stress and a significant reduction in antioxidant enzymes. The efficacy of SR-nitrite therapy was examined in obese OS subjected to CLI. After 3 wk of treatment, SR-nitrite (80 mg·kg-1·day-1 bid po) increased myocardial nitrite levels and eNOS function. Treatment with SR-nitrite reduced myocardial oxidative stress while increasing myocardial antioxidant capacity. Ex vivo assessment of vascular reactivity of left anterior descending coronary artery segments demonstrated marked improvement in vasoreactivity to sodium nitroprusside but not to substance P and bradykinin in SR-nitrite-treated animals compared with placebo-treated animals. In conclusion, in a clinically relevant, large-animal model of MetS and CLI, treatment with SR-nitrite enhanced myocardial NO bioavailability, attenuated oxidative stress, and improved ex vivo coronary artery vasorelaxation. © 2015 the American Physiological Society.


Polhemus D.J.,Health science Center | Bradley J.M.,Health science Center | Islam K.N.,Health science Center | Brewster L.P.,Emory University | And 8 more authors.
American Journal of Physiology - Heart and Circulatory Physiology | Year: 2015

Nitrite is a storage reservoir of nitric oxide that is readily reduced to nitric oxide under pathological conditions. Previous studies have demonstrated that nitrite levels are significantly reduced in cardiovascular disease states, including peripheral vascular disease. We investigated the cytopro-tective and proangiogenic actions of a novel, sustained-release formulation of nitrite (SR-nitrite) in a clinically relevant in vivo swine model of critical limb ischemia (CLI) involving central obesity and metabolic syndrome. CLI was induced in obese Ossabaw swine (n = 18) by unilateral external iliac artery deployment of a full cross-sectional vessel occlusion device positioned within an endovascular expanded polytetrafluoroethylene-lined nitinol stent-graft. At post-CLI day 14, pigs were randomized to placebo (n = 9) or SR-nitrite (80 mg, n = 9) twice daily by mouth for 21 days. SR-nitrite therapy increased nitrite, nitrate, and S-nitrosothiol in plasma and ischemic skeletal muscle. Oxidative stress was reduced in ischemic limb tissue of SR-nitrite- compared with placebo-treated pigs. Ischemic limb tissue levels of proangiogenic growth factors were increased following SR-nitrite therapy compared with placebo. Despite the increases in cyto protective and angiogenic signals with SR-nitrite therapy, new arterial vessel formation and enhancement of blood flow to the ischemic limb were not different from placebo. Our data clearly demonstrate cyto protective and proangiogenic signaling in ischemic tissues following SR-nitrite therapy in a very severe model of CLI. Further studies evaluating longer-duration nitrite therapy and/or additional nitrite dosing strategies are warranted to more fully evaluate the therapeutic potential of nitrite therapy in peripheral vascular disease. © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

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