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Velapasamy S.,Molecular Research and Services Laboratory | Alex L.,Molecular Research and Services Laboratory | Chahil J.K.,Molecular Research and Services Laboratory | Lye S.H.,Molecular Research and Services Laboratory | And 6 more authors.
Genetic Testing and Molecular Biomarkers | Year: 2013

Objective: The identification of high-risk individuals can help to improve early cancer detection and patient survival. Risk assessment, however, can only be accomplished if the risk factors are known. To date, the genetic risk factors for ovarian cancer, other than mutations in the BRCA1/2 genes, have never been systematically explored in Malaysia. The present study aims to identify from a panel of cancer-associated single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), those associated with ovarian cancer risk in Malaysia. Methods: A total of 768 SNPs associated with various cancers among Asians were identified through a search of the relevant literature, and these SNPs were then screened for their association with ovarian cancer. A total of 160 Malaysian subjects were recruited for the study, including both ovarian cancer patients and controls. Genotyping was carried out using Illumina BeadArray platform. Results: A panel of 45 SNPs that are significantly (p <0.05) associated with ovarian cancer risk was identified. These ovarian cancer-associated SNPs were located in genes implicated in various pathways of carcinogenesis. Of these 45 SNPs, 5 have been previously associated with either ovarian cancer risk or survival. Conclusion: This study has identified a panel of 45 SNPs that are significantly associated with ovarian cancer in a Malaysian population. © Copyright 2013, Mary Ann Liebert, Inc. 2013. Source


Hashim N.A.N.,Molecular Research and Services Laboratory | Ramzi N.H.,Molecular Research and Services Laboratory | Velapasamy S.,Molecular Research and Services Laboratory | Alex L.,Molecular Research and Services Laboratory | And 5 more authors.
Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention | Year: 2012

Background: Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is endemic in Southern Chinese and Southeast Asian populations. Geographical and ethnic clustering of the cancer is due to genetic, environmental, and lifestyle risk factors. This case-control study aimed to identify or confirm both genetic and non-genetic risk factors for NPC in one of the endemic countries, Malaysia. Materials and Methods: A panel of 768 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) previously associated with various cancers and known non-genetic risk factors for NPC were selected and analyzed for their associations with NPC in a case-control study. Results: Statistical analysis identified 40 SNPs associated with NPC risk in our population, including 5 documented previously by genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and other case-control studies; the associations of the remaining 35 SNPs with NPC were novel. In addition, consistent with previous studies, exposure to occupational hazards, overconsumption of salt-cured foods, red meat, as well as low intake of fruits and vegetables were also associated with NPC risk. Conclusions: In short, this study confirmed and/or identified genetic, environmental and dietary risk factors associated with NPC susceptibility in a Southeast Asian population. Source


Chahil J.K.,Molecular Research and Services Laboratory | Munretnam K.,Molecular Research and Services Laboratory | Samsudin N.,Molecular Research and Services Laboratory | Lye S.H.,Molecular Research and Services Laboratory | And 5 more authors.
Indian Journal of Clinical Biochemistry | Year: 2014

Genome-wide association studies have discovered multiple single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with the risk of common diseases. The objective of this study was to demonstrate the replication of previously published SNPs that showed statistical significance for breast cancer in the Malaysian population. In this case-control study, 80 subjects for each group were recruited from various hospitals in Malaysia. A total of 768 SNPs were genotyped and analyzed to distinguish risk and protective alleles. A total of three SNPs were found to be associated with increased risk of breast cancer while six SNPs showed protective effect. All nine were statistically significant SNPs (p ≤ 0.01), five SNPs from previous studies were successfully replicated in our study. Significant modifiable (diet) and non-modifiable (family history of breast cancer in first degree relative) risk factors were also observed. We identified nine SNPs from this study to be either conferring susceptibility or protection to breast cancer which may serve as potential markers in risk prediction. © 2014 Association of Clinical Biochemists of India. Source

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