Catalonia, Spain
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PubMed | Planning and Research Unit, Institute of Health Studies, University of Barcelona and Hospital del Mar
Type: | Journal: Journal of oncology pharmacy practice : official publication of the International Society of Oncology Pharmacy Practitioners | Year: 2015

The traditional model of community pharmacy has changed, with patients, caregivers and consumers having access to many cognitive services other than the traditional dispensing and supply of medicines. In December 2009, a population-based colorectal cancer screening program started in Barcelona, introducing the community pharmacist and the professional expertise of the pharmacist into the organisational model.To evaluate the program implementation process in the pharmacies, identify barriers and facilitators, and know the opinion of the professionals involved in the colorectal cancer screening program in Catalonia (Spain).Cross-sectional study of the pharmacies that participated in the first round of the program during the first and second trimester of 2010 in Barcelona. A validated questionnaire was used to analyse several functional aspects in the implementation process. Qualitative aspects about the opinion of the pharmacist were studied. A descriptive and bivariate analysis was performed.All the pharmacies involved in the program (n=74) participated in the study. The majority of the sample population was composed of women (70.3%), mean age 44.9 years, and most of them (74%) had attended a specific training session. Pharmacists considered their participation in the program to be an added value to their professional role and a way to increase consumers confidence on this kind of services. The average time to provide the service was estimated to be less than 10 minutes per consumer. Only three (4.1%) pharmacists considered that the program involved a lot of extra work in the daily activities of the pharmacy. The level of satisfaction of the pharmacists was very high.Community pharmacies can be a successful alternative and great resource to implement a population cancer screening program. This functional model can improve the accessibility and participation rates on target population. The level of motivation of the community pharmacist, the specific training program and the perception to give a better care for their patients can be an enabler.


PubMed | University of Barcelona, University of the Basque Country, CIBER ISCIII, University Pompeu Fabra and 2 more.
Type: Journal Article | Journal: PloS one | Year: 2016

Common low-penetrance genetic variants have been consistently associated with colorectal cancer risk.To determine if these genetic variants are associated also with adenoma susceptibility and may improve selection of patients with increased risk for advanced adenomas and/or multiplicity ( 3 adenomas).We selected 1,326 patients with increased risk for advanced adenomas and/or multiplicity and 1,252 controls with normal colonoscopy from population-based colorectal cancer screening programs. We conducted a case-control association study analyzing 30 colorectal cancer susceptibility variants in order to investigate the contribution of these variants to the development of subsequent advanced neoplasia and/or multiplicity.We found that 14 of the analyzed genetic variants showed a statistically significant association with advanced adenomas and/or multiplicity: the probability of developing these lesions increased with the number of risk alleles reaching a 2.3-fold risk increment in individuals with 17 risk alleles.Nearly half of the genetic variants associated with colorectal cancer risk are also related to advanced adenoma and/or multiplicity predisposition. Assessing the number of risk alleles in individuals within colorectal cancer screening programs may help to identify better a subgroup with increased risk for advanced neoplasia and/or multiplicity in the general population.


Abuli A.,University Pompeu Fabra | Castells A.,University of Barcelona | Bujanda L.,University of the Basque Country | Lozano J.J.,CIBER ISCIII | And 11 more authors.
PLoS ONE | Year: 2016

Background: Common low-penetrance genetic variants have been consistently associated with colorectal cancer risk. Aim: To determine if these genetic variants are associated also with adenoma susceptibility and may improve selection of patients with increased risk for advanced adenomas and/or multiplicity (≥3 adenomas). Methods: We selected 1,326 patients with increased risk for advanced adenomas and/or multiplicity and 1,252 controls with normal colonoscopy from population-based colorectal cancer screening programs. We conducted a case-control association study analyzing 30 colorectal cancer susceptibility variants in order to investigate the contribution of these variants to the development of subsequent advanced neoplasia and/or multiplicity. Results: We found that 14 of the analyzed genetic variants showed a statistically significant association with advanced adenomas and/or multiplicity: the probability of developing these lesions increased with the number of risk alleles reaching a 2.3-fold risk increment in individuals with ≥ 17 risk alleles. Conclusions: Nearly half of the genetic variants associated with colorectal cancer risk are also related to advanced adenoma and/or multiplicity predisposition. Assessing the number of risk alleles in individuals within colorectal cancer screening programs may help to identify better a subgroup with increased risk for advanced neoplasia and/or multiplicity in the general population. © 2016 Abulí et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.


Nessa A.,Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University | Rashid M.H.U.,Planning and Research Unit | E-Ferdous N.,Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University | Chowdhury A.,Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University
Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Research | Year: 2013

Aim: To evaluate the feasibility of the 'see and treat' protocol for the management of high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) at a colposcopy clinic in Bangladesh. Material and Methods: A cross-sectional and comparative study was carried out between two periods on 358 colposcopy-diagnosed high-grade CIN at the colposcopy clinic of Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University (BSMMU). During the first period (January 2005 to June 2008), 181 colposcopy-diagnosed high-grade CIN patients had cervical biopsy by punch biopsy forceps and histology-confirmed high-grade CIN were treated by loop electrosurgical excision procedure (LEEP). During the second period (July 2008 to December 2009), 177 colposcopy-diagnosed high-grade CIN were treated by LEEP at their first visit. Results: During the first and second periods, 48 of 87 and 55 of 73 histology-proven high-grade CIN cases, respectively, received treatment. Among the study population, 37.3% women who had normal or CIN-I in histology were treated unnecessarily in the second period. The compliance of treatment improved by 20% and failure to receive treatment fell by 20%; these changes were statistically significant (P = 0.006). Conclusion: 'See and treat' protocol is a well-accepted, feasible and useful option for management of high-grade CIN in Bangladesh. It reduces the number of visits to the clinic and failure to receive treatment. © 2012 Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology.


Nessa A.,Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University | Rashid M.H.U.,Planning and Research Unit | Jahan M.,Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University | Noor-E-Ferdous,Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University | And 2 more authors.
Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention | Year: 2014

Background: Cervical cancer is a major public health problem in Bangladesh. Persistence of high risk human papillomavirus (HRHPV) influences the progression of the disease, with an important role in followup for cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN). Objective: To establish application of high risk HPV DNA test in the follow-up of women after treatment of CIN. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional and hospital based study was carried out among 145 CIN treated women during the previous six months to three years at the colposcopy clinic of Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University, Dhaka, between January 2011 and June 2012. Pap smear and HPV samples were collected and colposcopy was performed to find out the persistence of the disease. Cervical samples obtained were tested for HPV DNA using the Hybrid Capture II (HC-II) test. A cervical biopsy was collected whenever necessary. The results were compared to assess the efficacy of different methods during follow up such as Pap smear, HPV test and colposcopy. Results: Mean age of the recruited women (n=145) was 33.6 (± 7.6), mean age of marriage was 16.8 (±2.9) and mean age of 1st delivery was 18.8 (±3.5) years. More than half had high grade CIN before treatment and 115 (79.3%) women were managed by LEEP and 20.7% were managed by cold coagulation. Among the 145 treated women, 139 were negative for HPV DNA and six of them (4.1%) were HPV positive. Sensitivity of Pap smear (40.0) and HPV DNA test (40.0) was poor, but specificity was quite satisfactory (>93.0) for all the tests. Conclusions: The high risk HPV DNA test can be an effective method of identifying residual disease. It can be added to colposcopy and this should be applied to all treated women attending for their first or second post-treatment follow-up visit at 6 months to one year, irrespective of the grade of treated CIN.

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