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Navarro-Ortega A.,CSIC - Institute of Environmental Assessment And Water Research | Acuna V.,Catalan Institute for Water Research | Bellin A.,University of Trento | Burek P.,European Commission - Joint Research Center Ispra | And 30 more authors.
Science of the Total Environment | Year: 2015

Water scarcity is a serious environmental problem in many European regions, and will likely increase in the near future as a consequence of increased abstraction and climate change. Water scarcity exacerbates the effects of multiple stressors, and thus results in decreased water quality. It impacts river ecosystems, threatens the services they provide, and it will force managers and policy-makers to change their current practices. The EU-FP7 project GLOBAQUA aims at identifying the prevalence, interaction and linkages between stressors, and to assess their effects on the chemical and ecological status of freshwater ecosystems in order to improve water management practice and policies. GLOBAQUA assembles a multidisciplinary team of 21 European plus 2 non-European scientific institutions, as well as water authorities and river basin managers. The project includes experts in hydrology, chemistry, biology, geomorphology, modelling, socio-economics, governance science, knowledge brokerage, and policy advocacy. GLOBAQUA studies six river basins (Ebro, Adige, Sava, Evrotas, Anglian and Souss Massa) affected by water scarcity, and aims to answer the following questions: how does water scarcity interact with other existing stressors in the study river basins? How will these interactions change according to the different scenarios of future global change? Which will be the foreseeable consequences for river ecosystems? How will these in turn affect the services the ecosystems provide? How should management and policies be adapted to minimise the ecological, economic and societal consequences? These questions will be approached by combining data-mining, field- and laboratory-based research, and modelling. Here, we outline the general structure of the project and the activities to be conducted within the fourteen work-packages of GLOBAQUA. © 2014.


Navarro-Ortega A.,CSIC - Institute of Environmental Assessment And Water Research | Acuna V.,Catalan Institute for Water Research | Bellin A.,University of Trento | Burek P.,European Commission - Joint Research Center Ispra | And 29 more authors.
Science of the Total Environment | Year: 2014

Water scarcity is a serious environmental problem in many European regions, and will likely increase in the near future as a consequence of increased abstraction and climate change. Water scarcity exacerbates the effects of multiple stressors, and thus results in decreased water quality. It impacts river ecosystems, threatens the services they provide, and it will force managers and policy-makers to change their current practices. The EU-FP7 project GLOBAQUA aims at identifying the prevalence, interaction and linkages between stressors, and to assess their effects on the chemical and ecological status of freshwater ecosystems in order to improve water management practice and policies. GLOBAQUA assembles a multidisciplinary team of 21 European plus 2 non-European scientific institutions, as well as water authorities and river basin managers. The project includes experts in hydrology, chemistry, biology, geomorphology, modelling, socio-economics, governance science, knowledge brokerage, and policy advocacy. GLOBAQUA studies six river basins (Ebro, Adige, Sava, Evrotas, Anglian and Souss Massa) affected by water scarcity, and aims to answer the following questions: how does water scarcity interact with other existing stressors in the study river basins? How will these interactions change according to the different scenarios of future global change? Which will be the foreseeable consequences for river ecosystems? How will these in turn affect the services the ecosystems provide? How should management and policies be adapted to minimise the ecological, economic and societal consequences? These questions will be approached by combining data-mining, field- and laboratory-based research, and modelling. Here, we outline the general structure of the project and the activities to be conducted within the fourteen work-packages of GLOBAQUA. © 2014.


Karagiannis F.,Research and Innovation Center in Information | Keramida D.,Research and Innovation Center in Information | Ioannidis Y.,Research and Innovation Center in Information | Laure E.,KTH Royal Institute of Technology | And 2 more authors.
Data Science Journal | Year: 2013

A general-purpose Global Research Data Infrastructure (GRDI) for all sciences and research purposes is not conceivable for the next decade as there are too many discipline-specific modalities that currently prevail for such generalisation efforts to be effective. On the other hand, a more pragmatic approach is to start from what currently exists, identify best practices and key issues, and promote effective inter-domain collaboration among different components forming an ecosystem. This will promote interoperability, data exchange, data preservation, and distributed access (among others). This ecosystem of interoperable research data infrastructures will be composed of regional, disciplinary, and multidisciplinary components, such as libraries, archives, and data centres, offering data services for both primary datasets and publications. The ecosystem will support data-intensive science and research and stimulate the interaction among all its elements, thus promoting multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary science. This special issue includes a set of independent papers from renowned experts on organisational and technological issues related to GRDIs. These documents feed into and compliment the GRDI2020 roadmap, which supports a Global Research Data Infrastructure ecosystem.


Kourtidis K.,Democritus University of Thrace | Georgoulias A.K.,Democritus University of Thrace | Vlahopoulou M.,Democritus University of Thrace | Tsirliganis N.,Research and Innovation Center in Information | And 3 more authors.
Journal of Environmental Radioactivity | Year: 2015

Extensive measurements of 222Rn in the town of Xanthi in N Greece show that the part of the town overlying granite deposits and the outcrop of a uranium ore has exceptionally high indoor radon levels, with monthly means up to 1500 Bq m-3. A large number of houses (40%) in this part of the town exhibit radon levels above 200 Bq m-3 while 11% of the houses had radon levels above 400 Bq m-3. Substantial interannual variability as well as the highest in Europe winter/summer ratios (up to 12) were observed in this part of the town, which consist of traditional stone masonry buildings of the late 19th-early 20th century. Measurements of 238U and 232Th content of building materials from these houses as well as radionuclide measurements in different floors show that the high levels of indoor radon measured in these buildings are not due to high radon emanation rates from the building materials themselves but rather due to high radon flux from the soil because of the underlying geology, high radon penetration rates into the buildings from underground due to the lack of solid concrete foundations in these buildings, or a combination thereof. From the meteorological variables studied, highest correlation with indoor 222Rn was found with temperature (r2 = 0.65). An indoor radon prognostic regression model using temperature, pressure and precipitation as input was developed, that reproduced indoor radon with r2 = 0.69. Hence, meteorology is the main driving factor of indoor radon, with temperature being the most important determinant. Preliminary flux measurements indicate that the soil-atmosphere 222Rn flux should be in the range 150-250 Bq m-2 h-1, which is in the upper 10% of flux values for Europe. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd.


Charalampous K.,Democritus University of Thrace | Charalampous K.,Research and Innovation Center in Information | Emmanouilidis C.,Research and Innovation Center in Information | Gasteratos A.,Democritus University of Thrace | Gasteratos A.,Research and Innovation Center in Information
IST 2014 - 2014 IEEE International Conference on Imaging Systems and Techniques, Proceedings | Year: 2014

The more the robotics technology tends to get established in human everyday life, the greater the necessity for robots to obtain social skills, facilitating their presence and behavior among humans. In order for robots to attain socially-aware characteristics, their navigation strategy should comply with a set of certain criteria, such as the respect of spatial interactions. Towards this end, the paper in hand presents a framework that operates on a single RGB-D scene. Initially it seeks the human presence and defines respective bounding boxes. Then, within the 3D reconstructed scene the people in the bounding boxes are replaced by points following a Gaussian distribution. The latter results to a grading occupancy grid, which complies with the spatial human comfort zones. © 2014 IEEE.


Charalampous K.,Democritus University of Thrace | Charalampous K.,Research and Innovation Center in Information | Kostavelis I.,Democritus University of Thrace | Chantzakou F.-E.,Democritus University of Thrace | And 5 more authors.
IST 2014 - 2014 IEEE International Conference on Imaging Systems and Techniques, Proceedings | Year: 2014

This paper proposes a novel methodology for place categorization in mobile robots based on the presence of objects. In order to achieve such categorization, the robot is equipped with an RGB-D sensor. For a given time interval the sensor's measurements are combined with robot's localization data and reconstruct the 3D scene from the respective pointclouds. Afterwards, the method searches for dominant planes which are the most probable locations for finding objects. Given those planes, this work seeks and discriminates objects. The recognized objects, form a distribution which is given as input to a Naive Bayesian classifier in order to categorize the place. © 2014 IEEE.


PubMed | Research and Innovation Center in Information and Democritus University of Thrace
Type: | Journal: Journal of environmental radioactivity | Year: 2015

Extensive measurements of (222)Rn in the town of Xanthi in N Greece show that the part of the town overlying granite deposits and the outcrop of a uranium ore has exceptionally high indoor radon levels, with monthly means up to 1500Bqm(-3). A large number of houses (40%) in this part of the town exhibit radon levels above 200Bqm(-3) while 11% of the houses had radon levels above 400Bqm(-3). Substantial interannual variability as well as the highest in Europe winter/summer ratios (up to 12) were observed in this part of the town, which consist of traditional stone masonry buildings of the late 19th-early 20th century. Measurements of (238)U and (232)Th content of building materials from these houses as well as radionuclide measurements in different floors show that the high levels of indoor radon measured in these buildings are not due to high radon emanation rates from the building materials themselves but rather due to high radon flux from the soil because of the underlying geology, high radon penetration rates into the buildings from underground due to the lack of solid concrete foundations in these buildings, or a combination thereof. From the meteorological variables studied, highest correlation with indoor (222)Rn was found with temperature (r(2)=0.65). An indoor radon prognostic regression model using temperature, pressure and precipitation as input was developed, that reproduced indoor radon with r(2)=0.69. Hence, meteorology is the main driving factor of indoor radon, with temperature being the most important determinant. Preliminary flux measurements indicate that the soil-atmosphere (222)Rn flux should be in the range 150-250Bqm(-2)h(-1), which is in the upper 10% of flux values for Europe.

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