Research and Development Station for Sheep and Goats

Caransebeş, Romania

Research and Development Station for Sheep and Goats

Caransebeş, Romania
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Ilie D.E.,Research and Development Station for Bovine | Cean A.,Research and Development Station for Bovine | Cziszter L.T.,University of Veterinary and Animal Sciences | Gavojdian D.,Research and Development Station for Sheep and Goats | And 2 more authors.
PLoS ONE | Year: 2015

The Eastern European Grey cattle are regarded as the direct descendants of the aurochs (Bos taurus primigenius). Nowadays in Romania, less than 100 Grey animals are being reared and included in the national gene reserve. We examined the genetic diversity among Romanian Grey, Brown, Spotted and Black and White cattle breeds, with a particular focus on Romanian Grey through the use of (i) 11 bovine specific microsatellite markers on 83 animals and (ii) 638 bp length of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) D-loop region sequence data from a total of 81 animals. Both microsatellite and mtDNA analysis revealed a high level of genetic variation in the studied breeds. In Romanian Grey a total of 100 alleles were found, the mean number of observed alleles per locus was 9.091; the average observed heterozygosity was 0.940; the Wright's fixation index (FIS) was negative (-0.189) and indicates that there is no inbreeding and no selection pressure. MtDNA analysis revealed 52 haplotypes with 67 variable sites among the Romanian cattle breeds without any insertion or deletion. Haplotype diversity was 0.980 ± 0.007 and ranged from 0.883 ± 0.056 (Brown) to 0.990 ± 0.028 (Spotted and Black and White). The highest genetic variability of the mtDNA was recorded in the Grey breed, where 18 haplotypes were identified. The most frequent mtDNA D-loop region belonged to T3 haplogroup (80.247%), which was found across all studied breeds, while T2 haplotypes (16.049%) was only found in Grey, Spotted and Black and White genotypes. The T1 haplotypes (3.704%) were found in the Grey and Spotted. The current results contribute to the general knowledge on genetic diversity found in Eastern European cattle breeds and could prove a valuable tool for the conservation efforts of animal genetic resources (FAnGR). © 2015 Ilie et al.


Gavojdian D.,University of Veterinary and Animal Sciences | Cziszter L.T.,University of Veterinary and Animal Sciences | Padeanu I.,University of Veterinary and Animal Sciences | Pacala N.,University of Veterinary and Animal Sciences | And 4 more authors.
Journal of Food, Agriculture and Environment | Year: 2012

Aim of the current research was to evaluate the effects that crossing Dorper (DO) rams with indigenous Romanian Turcana (TA) ewes have on growth rates, survivability and carcass quality of F 1 crossbreed lambs when managed in an extensive rearing production system. Researches were carried out in a commercial farm in western Romania, in extensive management conditions, for producing organic lamb meat. At the age of 240 days, crossbred lambs had an average weight of 44.6 kg, a significantly higher weight than those from the control group (p<0.001), which achieved 36.7 kg. Differences of 7.9 kg/marketed lamb could prove valuable for the overall profitability and returns for the sheep farmers that will adopt crossing DO rams with indigenous Romanian TA ewes. Average daily gain (ADG) of F 1 DO x TA lambs during the first 90 days of age was, on average, 226 g being higher (p<0.001) compared to TA lambs who gained, on average, 173 g 1/day. Survival rates of lambs until the age of slaughter (240 days) was not affected by the genotype (p>0.05), averages being 88.4% for crossbred lambs and 88.8% for purebred TA lambs. DO rams greatly improved the carcass quality about 75% of crossbred carcasses were included in U and R categories, while over 80% of TA carcasses were included in O and P classes. Using DO rams as crossing sires for the Romanian native TA ewes significantly improved the meat production of the F 1 crossbred lambs, by terms of growth rates and carcass quality at slaughter. It is clearly that breed complementarity exists between the two genotypes. The Romanian sheep industry could benefit from of this genetic combinability, especially those farmers who use extensive rearing systems to produce organic lamb meat.


Kusza S.,Debrecen University | Zakar E.,Debrecen University | Budai C.,Debrecen University | Cziszter L.-T.,University of Veterinary and Animal Sciences | And 2 more authors.
Acta Biochimica Polonica | Year: 2015

The current knowledge and documentation on the origins and relationship between Gyimesi Racka reared in Hungary and the Romanian Turcana is rather controversial. Lack of information and scientific reliable proofs for the divergent theories found in the two countries motivated us to implement a trial using molecular methods to assess the genetic distance and diversity in the two breeds. Hair follicles were collected from Gyimesi Racka (2 phenotypes) and from Turcana (6 ecotypes). The 599 bp segment of the D-loop region of the mitochondrial DNA was sequenced. Altogether, 42 haplotypes were identified, while 23 were found in both populations. Populations were highly diverse according to the haplotype and nucleotide diversity indices. AMOVA analysis showed that most of the variation was observed within populations (98%), indicating a weak genetic structure between the two breeds. Animals were grouped into seven groups based on their phenotype; however genetic distances among them were also low. Tajima's D, Fu's Fs, goodness-of-fit statistics, mismatch distribution and network analysis suggested recent demographic expansion. Current comprehensive mtDNA study indicates that there is very low level of genetic differentiation between the Gyimesi Racka and Turcana populations therefore they are de facto one trans-boundary breed.


PubMed | Research and Development Station for Sheep and Goats, Victor Babes University of Medicine and Pharmacy Timisoara, University of Veterinary and Animal Sciences, Research and Development Station for Bovine and Debrecen University
Type: Journal Article | Journal: PloS one | Year: 2015

The Eastern European Grey cattle are regarded as the direct descendants of the aurochs (Bos taurus primigenius). Nowadays in Romania, less than 100 Grey animals are being reared and included in the national gene reserve. We examined the genetic diversity among Romanian Grey, Brown, Spotted and Black and White cattle breeds, with a particular focus on Romanian Grey through the use of (i) 11 bovine specific microsatellite markers on 83 animals and (ii) 638 bp length of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) D-loop region sequence data from a total of 81 animals. Both microsatellite and mtDNA analysis revealed a high level of genetic variation in the studied breeds. In Romanian Grey a total of 100 alleles were found, the mean number of observed alleles per locus was 9.091; the average observed heterozygosity was 0.940; the Wrights fixation index (FIS) was negative (-0.189) and indicates that there is no inbreeding and no selection pressure. MtDNA analysis revealed 52 haplotypes with 67 variable sites among the Romanian cattle breeds without any insertion or deletion. Haplotype diversity was 0.980 0.007 and ranged from 0.883 0.056 (Brown) to 0.990 0.028 (Spotted and Black and White). The highest genetic variability of the mtDNA was recorded in the Grey breed, where 18 haplotypes were identified. The most frequent mtDNA D-loop region belonged to T3 haplogroup (80.247%), which was found across all studied breeds, while T2 haplotypes (16.049%) was only found in Grey, Spotted and Black and White genotypes. The T1 haplotypes (3.704%) were found in the Grey and Spotted. The current results contribute to the general knowledge on genetic diversity found in Eastern European cattle breeds and could prove a valuable tool for the conservation efforts of animal genetic resources (FAnGR).


PubMed | Research and Development Station for Sheep and Goats, University of Veterinary and Animal Sciences and Debrecen University
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Acta biochimica Polonica | Year: 2015

The current knowledge and documentation on the origins and relationship between Gyimesi Racka reared in Hungary and the Romanian Turcana is rather controversial. Lack of information and scientific reliable proofs for the divergent theories found in the two countries motivated us to implement a trial using molecular methods to assess the genetic distance and diversity in the two breeds. Hair follicles were collected from Gyimesi Racka (2 phenotypes) and from Turcana (6 ecotypes). The 599 bp segment of the D-loop region of the mitochondrial DNA was sequenced. Altogether, 42 haplotypes were identified, while 23 were found in both populations. Populations were highly diverse according to the haplotype and nucleotide diversity indices. AMOVA analysis showed that most of the variation was observed within populations (98%), indicating a weak genetic structure between the two breeds. Animals were grouped into seven groups based on their phenotype; however genetic distances among them were also low. Tajimas D, Fus Fs, goodness-of-fit statistics, mismatch distribution and network analysis suggested recent demographic expansion. Current comprehensive mtDNA study indicates that there is very low level of genetic differentiation between the Gyimesi Racka and Turcana populations therefore they are de facto one trans-boundary breed.

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