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Awad H.,Research and Development Sector | Aboul-Enein H.Y.,National Research Center of Egypt | Lashin S.,Research and Development Sector
Biomedical Chromatography | Year: 2012

A high-performance liquid chromatography-diode array detector (HPLC-DAD) method was developed and validated for the quantitation of dexibuprofen in dexibuprofen tablets using ovomucoid chiral stationary phase (Ultron ES-OVM). The mobile phase was composed of 0.025 m potassium phosphate dibasic (pH 4.5)-methanol-ethanol (85:10:5v/v/v). The method was validated for specificity, linearity, range, accuracy, precision and robustness. The method was enantiomer-specific for the determination of dexibuprofen [S-(+)-isomer ibuprofen] in the presence of R-(-)-isomer ibuprofen in bulk drug, pharmaceutical dosage form and under stress degradation. The method was linear over the range 15-35μg/mL with r 2=0.9995; accuracy and precision were acceptable with %RSD<2.0%. The method was found to be specific, precise, accurate, robust and stability-indicating, and can be successfully applied for the routine analysis of dexibuprofen in bulk drug and pharmaceutical dosage form. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Source


Awad H.,Research and Development Sector | Aboul-Enein H.Y.,National Research Center of Egypt
Journal of Chromatographic Science | Year: 2013

A high-performance liquid chromatography-diode array detector method was developed and validated for the quantification of sodium alginate in antacid oral suspension using a phenyl stationary phase and buffer solution at pH 7.0 as a mobile phase. The method was validated for specificity, linearity, range, accuracy, precision and robustness. The method was specific for the determination of sodium alginate in the bulk drug, pharmaceutical dosage form and under stress degradation. The method was linear over the range of 600 to 1,400 μg/mL with r2 = 0.9999, and accuracy and precision were acceptable with relative standard deviation < 2.0%. The described method is simple, specific, precise, accurate, robust and stability-indicating, and can be successfully applied for the routine analysis of sodium alginate in bulk drug and pharmaceutical dosage form. © The Author [2012]. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. Source


Abdelmoez W.,Minia University | Mostafa N.A.,Taif University | Mustafa A.,Research and Development Sector
Journal of Cleaner Production | Year: 2013

The present work deals with the production of lipase by Candida rugosa ATCC 14830 and focuses on the effect of different substrates on lipase production by submerged fermentation. Two industrial wastes from oil refining and the oleochemical industry were evaluated as substitutes to olive oil for lipase production through aerobic fermentation. Lipase activity, protein yield and cell mass were studied using different substrates concentrations. First, olive oil (OO), fatty acid residues (FAR) and soapstock (SS) were tested individually as substrates. The activities of the produced lipases, utilizing these substrates, were found to be 12 U/ml, 7 U/ml and 7.4 U/ml, respectively. Second, a mixture of these substrates composed of fatty acid residues, olive oil, and soapstock (POS) were formulated and used for lipase production. The obtained results showed that the lipase activity achieved was 10 U/ml. The produced lipase has been used in sunflower oil hydrolysis. The results revealed that 39.5% of the original tested sunflower oil was hydrolyzed into free fatty acids after 24 h at 37 C. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. Source


El-Gamal H.,Assiut University | Farid M.E.-A.,Assiut University | Mageed A.I.A.,Assiut University | Bady M.,Alexandria University | And 2 more authors.
American Journal of Environmental Sciences | Year: 2013

The natural radioactivity level of heavy oil, ash and soil samples around Assiut Thermal Power Plant (ATPP) in Egypt was determined using gamma ray spectrometry. The average concentrations of 226Ra, 232Th and 40K in fly ash were found to be 2307±143, 1281±80 and 1218±129 Bq kg-1, respectively, while the corresponding values in soil samples were 2670±107, 1401±78 and 1495±100 Bq kg-1, respectively. These are extremely high and higher by several orders of magnitude than the worldwide population-weighted average values in soil. The radium equivalent activity, the air absorbed dose rate, external hazard index and the annual effective dose rate were calculated and compared with the international recommended values. All averages of these parameters are much higher by several orders of magnitude than the international recommended values, indicating significant radiological health hazards around ATPP due to the radionuclides in the soil. Moreover, the water samples investigated have high activity concentrations indicating that the water is highly contaminated with radioactive materials. The results of the current study highlight the severity of this radioactive pollution on the population in the vicinity of ATPP. © 2013 Science Publication. Source


El-Gamal H.,Assiut University | Farid M.E.-A.,Assiut University | Abdel Mageed A.I.,Assiut University | Hasab M.,Assiut University | Hassanien H.M.,Research and Development Sector
Environmental Science and Pollution Research | Year: 2013

Heavy fuel oil and ash samples were collected from the Assiut thermal power plant in Egypt and subjected to gamma spectrometry analysis for natural radioactivity contents. Considerable results were observed where the ash contains nearly 1,000 times natural radionuclides more than raw oil. The results were confirmed by measuring the samples via using different devices in different institutions. All ash samples had radium equivalent activities and external hazard index values more than 370 Bq/kg and unity respectively. The mean absorbed dose rate was10,650 nGy/h which is nearly 190 times higher than the global average value of 55 nGy/h. The corresponding annual external effective dose is estimated to be 13 mSv/year, which is nearly 30 times higher than that in areas of natural background radiation (0.46 mSv/year). © 2013 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg. Source

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