Reproductive science Medical Center

San Diego, CA, United States

Reproductive science Medical Center

San Diego, CA, United States
SEARCH FILTERS
Time filter
Source Type

Sills E.S.,Center for Advanced Genetics | Sills E.S.,Palomar Medical Center | Li X.,Center for Advanced Genetics | Wood S.H.,Reproductive science Medical Center | And 2 more authors.
Obstetrics and Gynecology Science | Year: 2017

Objective Although previous research has suggested that risk for reoperation among hysteroscopic sterilization (HS) patients is more than ten times higher than for patients undergoing standard laparoscopic tubal ligation, little has been reported about these subsequent procedures. Methods This descriptive cohort study used a confidential online questionnaire to gather data from women (n=3,803) who volunteered information on HS followed by device removal surgery performed due to new symptoms developing after Essure placement. Results In this sample, mean age was 35.6 years and women undergoing hysterectomy after HS comprised 64.9% (n=2,468). Median interval between HS and hysterectomy was 3.7 (interquartile range, 3.9) years and mean age at hysterectomy was 36.3 years. Some patients (n=1,035) sought removal of HS devices and fallopian tubes only, while other miscellaneous gynecological procedures were also occasionally performed for Essure-associated symptoms. When data from all patients who had any post-Essure surgery besides hysterectomy were aggregated (e.g., device removal + "other" cases, n=1,335) and compared to those cases undergoing hysterectomy, mean age was significantly lower than for the hysterectomy group (34.4 vs. 36.3 years, respectively; P < 0.01); uterus-conserving surgeries were also typically performed significantly earlier than hysterectomy (P < 0.01). Conclusion This investigation is the first to characterize specific gynecological operations after Essure, and suggests that the predominant surgical answer to HS complaints is hysterectomy for many women. Dissatisfaction with HS may represent an important indication for hysterectomy and additional study is needed to quantify this phenomenon. © 2017 Korean Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology.


Sills E.S.,Reproductive Research Section | Sills E.S.,Palomar Medical Center | Obregon-Tito A.J.,Fulgent Diagnostics | Gao H.,Fulgent Diagnostics | And 4 more authors.
Clinical and Experimental Reproductive Medicine | Year: 2017

Objective To describe in vitro development of human embryos derived from an individual with a homozygous pathogenic variant in NLRP7 (19q13.42) and recurrent hydatidiform mole (HM), an autosomal recessive condition thought to occur secondary to an oocyte defect. Methods A patient with five consecutive HM pregnancies was genomically evaluated via next generation sequencing followed by controlled ovarian hyperstimulation, in vitro fertilization (IVF) with intracytoplasmic sperm injection, embryo culture, and preimplantation genetic screening. Findings in NLRP7 were recorded and embryo culture and biopsy data were tabulated as a function of parental origin for any identified ploidy error. Results The patient was found to have a pathogenic variant in NLRP7 (c.2810+2T > G) in a homozygous state. Fifteen oocytes were retrieved and 10 embryos were available after fertilization via intracytoplasmic sperm injection. Developmental arrest was noted for all 10 embryos after 144 hours in culture, thus no transfer was possible. These non-viable embryos were evaluated by karyomapping and all were diploid biparental; two were euploid and eight had various aneuploidies all of maternal origin. Conclusion This is the first report of early human embryo development from a patient with any NLRP7 mutation. The pathogenic variant identified here resulted in global developmental arrest at or before blastocyst stage. Standard IVF should therefore be discouraged for such patients, who instead need to consider oocyte (or embryo) donation with IVF as preferred clinical methods to treat infertility. © 2017. The Korean Society for Reproductive Medicine.

Loading Reproductive science Medical Center collaborators
Loading Reproductive science Medical Center collaborators