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Carney T.,Renfrew Center for Eating Disorders | Stein S.E.,Villanova University | Quinlan J.J.,Drexel University
British Journal of Nursing | Year: 2013

The purpose of this study was to investigate nurses' and nursing students' knowledge and perceived role in assisting patients with the nutritional management of diabetes. Three focus groups were conducted and the results were used to modify a previously developed survey regarding the nutritional management of diabetes. The survey was administered via an online survey tool and completed by 231 nurses and students. Over 70% of respondents agreed that nurses have an important role in reinforcing patient nutritional education. Results indicated, however, that knowledge gaps in the nutritional management of diabetes exist among nurses, including not knowing the carbohydrate content of 120 ml of orange juice, a common treatment for hypoglycaemia (47.5%), not knowing where to locate carbohydrate content on a food label (60%), and not identifying the correct treatment for hypoglycaemia (47.5%). These results indicate that there may be a need to improve the nutritional education of nurses with respect to diabetes management. Source


Witt A.A.,Drexel University | Lowe M.R.,Drexel University | Lowe M.R.,Renfrew Center for Eating Disorders
International Journal of Eating Disorders | Year: 2014

Background Hedonic hunger, the appetitive drive to eat to obtain pleasure in the absence of an energy deficit, is associated with overeating and with loss of control over eating, but has not been investigated among individuals with eating disorders. Objective (1) to compare participants with anorexia nervosa, restricting type (AN-R), anorexia nervosa, binge-purge type (AN-B/P), and bulimia nervosa (BN) on scores on the Power of Food Scale (PFS), a self-report measure of hedonic hunger; (2) to examine the relation between PFS scores and frequency of binge eating; and (3) to examine whether pre-treatment PFS scores predict weight change during treatment. Method The PFS and measures of eating disorder symptomatology were administered to female patients with AN (N = 119) and BN (N = 144) at admission to residential treatment. Results Participants with BN scored higher on the PFS compared to participants with AN-R or AN-B/P; there was a trend for those with AN-B/P to score higher than those with AN-R. PFS scores were positively associated with binge eating frequency among participants with BN; these associations remained significant when controlling for restraint and weight suppression. A similar pattern was found among participants with AN. PFS scores predicted weight change in AN but not BN. Discussion Results suggest that hedonic processes may be important in stimulating binge eating. Furthermore, hedonic appetite may facilitate weight restoration in AN. Further research should investigate whether pre-treatment PFS scores have prognostic significance with respect to eating disorder symptoms. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. (Int J Eat Disord 2014; 47:273-280) Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Source


Lowe M.R.,Drexel University | Lowe M.R.,Renfrew Center for Eating Disorders | Berner L.A.,Drexel University | Swanson S.A.,Harvard University | And 10 more authors.
Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology | Year: 2011

Objective: To investigate whether, at study entry, (a) weight suppression (WS), the difference between highest past adult weight and current weight, prospectively predicts time to first full remission from bulimia nervosa (BN) over a follow-up period of 8 years, and (b) weight change over time mediates the relationship between WS and time to first full remission. Method: A well-characterized sample of women with BN (N = 110; M age = 25.58 years, SD = 6.48) from the Massachusetts General Hospital Longitudinal Study of Eating Disorders was interviewed at 6-12 month intervals over 8 years. The main outcome measure, a "time to first full remission" variable, was based on psychiatric status ratings generated from the Eating Disorders Longitudinal Interval Follow-up Evaluation. Results: WS was significantly associated with time to first full remission (p =.01; hazard ratio =.89; 95 confidence interval [0.82, 0.97]), indicating that women who were more weight suppressed at study entry took longer to recover. Weight change did not mediate the relationship between WS and time to remission. Conclusions: Results add to a growing body of evidence that WS predicts maintenance of BN symptoms and extend previous short-term findings by demonstrating, over a period of approximately 8 years, that WS predicts longer time to first full remission. Beyond absolute weight status, WS level may significantly inform the treatment of BN. © 2011 American Psychological Association. Source


Witt A.A.,Drexel University | Raggio G.A.,Drexel University | Butryn M.L.,Drexel University | Lowe M.R.,Drexel University | Lowe M.R.,Renfrew Center for Eating Disorders
Appetite | Year: 2014

Research suggests that visceral bodily states, such as hunger, can affect participants' responses on self-report measures of eating behavior. The present study evaluated the influence of hunger and exposure to palatable food on self-reported hedonic appetite, measured using the Power of Food Scale (PFS). A secondary aim was to evaluate the effects of these manipulations on self-reported external eating and disinhibition. Participants (. N=. 67) ate a standardized meal followed by a 4-h fast. Participants were randomized to one of four groups (Fasted/Food Absence, Fasted/Food Exposure, Fed/Food Absence, or Fed/Food Exposure). In Phase I of the experiment (Hunger Manipulation), participants randomized to the "Fed" group drank a protein shake, while those in the "Fasted" group did not receive a shake. In Phase II (Palatable Food Exposure), participants in the "Food Exposure" group were visually exposed to palatable food items, while "Food Absence" participants were not. All participants completed the PFS, Dutch Eating Behavior Questionnaire External Eating subscale, and the Disinhibition subscale from the Eating Inventory during Phase II. Results showed no significant main or interactive effects of Hunger condition or Food Exposure condition on PFS, External Eating, or Disinhibition scores (all p's < 33). All effect sizes were small (partial etas squared ≤.015). Manipulation checks confirmed that the intended hunger and exposure interventions were successful. Results suggest that relatively short fasting periods (e.g., 4. h) analogous to typical breaks between meals are not associated with changes in scores on the PFS, External Eating, or Disinhibition scales. Hedonic hunger, at least as measured by the PFS, may represent a relatively stable construct that is not substantially affected by daily variations in hunger. In addition, individual differences in exposure to food in the immediate environment are unlikely to confound research using these measures. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. Source


Carney T.,Renfrew Center for Eating Disorders
British journal of nursing (Mark Allen Publishing) | Year: 2013

The purpose of this study was to investigate nurses' and nursing students'knowledge and perceived role in assisting patients with the nutritional management of diabetes. Three focus groups were conducted and the results were used to modify a previously developed survey regarding the nutritional management of diabetes. The survey was administered via an online survey tool and completed by 231 nurses and students. Over 70% of respondents agreed that nurses have an important role in reinforcing patient nutritional education. Results indicated,however, that knowledge gaps in the nutritional management of diabetes exist among nurses, including not knowing the carbohydrate content of 120ml of orange juice, a common treatment for hypoglycaemia (47.5%), not knowing where to locate carbohydrate content on a food label (60%), and not identifying the correct treatment for hypoglycaemia (47.5%). These results indicate that there may be a need to improve the nutritional education of nurses with respect to diabetes management. Source

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