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Carrillo G.,REMSA | Mansuri O.E.,Akakus Oil Operations
SPE Middle East Oil and Gas Show and Conference, MEOS, Proceedings | Year: 2011

Biological treatment has been successfully used to remediate oily contaminated soil in El Sharara Field, South West of Libya. A reduction of 66.6% in TPH GC Sum, Gas Chromatographic Total Petroleum Hydrocarbon, was obtained in a period of 6.2 months (from July of 2007 to January of 2008). During this time, mineral oil decreased from 15000 to 5000 mg/kg dry matter. The pilot trial consisted in a soil pile of about 2.2 meters in height, mechanically mixed to maintain aerobic conditions. The volume of the pile was approximately 180 m3. The goal of the bioremediation pilot trial was to degrade hydrocarbons by using a low-cost, "poorly controlled" technology which consisted in stimulating naturally occurring microorganisms by adding oxygen (mixing), nutrients and water. One important advantage of the applied technique is that moisture of the soil was maintained at a certain level during the treatment period by adding a minimal amount of water, which is particularly important under the desert working conditions. Another advantages are that contaminants are destroyed, making this a toxicity reduction process that is preferred by the regulators, the treatment systems are relatively easy to design and construct, remediation can be completed in a relatively short time of 3 to 6 months. Mechanically aerated piles offer a cost-competitive technology compared to thermal desorption or landfilling and can be engineered to be potentially effective for any combination of site conditions and petroleum products. Copyright 2011, Society of Petroleum Engineers.


Gaaim A.,NOC | Benrewin M.A.,REMSA | Samama M.,Repsol | Naas A.,Akakus Oil Operations
72nd European Association of Geoscientists and Engineers Conference and Exhibition 2010: A New Spring for Geoscience. Incorporating SPE EUROPEC 2010 | Year: 2010

PVT data are essential in conducting reservoir engineering studies, and whenever experimentally derived PVT data are not available, correlations are commonly used. These correlations are applicable in a limited range of reservoir fluid properties and some are based on local geographical regions. Murzuq basin crude oils are characterized by their low bubble point pressures and low gas oil ratios. This paper evaluates the most frequently used PVT correlations for application in crude oils of the Murzuq Basin in Libya. The oil formation volume factor was predicted with reasonable accuracy by most of the correlations without modifications to the original forms. Most of the tested correlations for predicting bubble point pressure and solution gas oil ratio, however, were not comparable with the experimental data. Modified forms were generated and gave better estimates of the bubble point pressures and solution gas oil ratios than the original published correlations. These modified forms could now be used to predict oil properties for crude oils with low bubble point pressures and low gas oil ratios. © 2010, European Association of Geoscientists and Engineers.


Gruenwald R.,REMSA | Buitrago J.,REMSA | Dessay J.,REMSA | Diaz C.,REMSA | And 3 more authors.
72nd European Association of Geoscientists and Engineers Conference and Exhibition 2010: A New Spring for Geoscience. Incorporating SPE EUROPEC 2010 | Year: 2010

As part of the exploration process for a prospective area in the Sirte Basin, offshore Libya, geopressure prediction was performed on 200 km2 of 3D seismic data in two subsets of 100 km2 each from the NC202 survey. Fluid and fracture pressure interpretation was based on well control and seismic interval velocities. Offset well control included one well located within the seismic survey area. This well contained no RFT or MDT data, but did have mud weights (MW), leak-off tests and wireline logs. A second well near the survey was tied by a 2D seismic line. This well contained MDT and DST data. © 2010, European Association of Geoscientists and Engineers.

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