State College, PA, United States
State College, PA, United States

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Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Army | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 748.90K | Year: 2010

The goal of this effort is to create a hybrid software product that combines a full wave electromagnetic solver with a sophisticated circuit simulator creating an engineering tool that is capable of simulating the complete system of complex electronic devices. This tool will be powerful asset for a wide variety of government and industry users for applications that combine field and circuit interaction such as radio design, co-site interference, and active tuning. Government applications could include the co-location of multiple transmitters on a vehicle or the impact of electromagnetic pulse on circuitry while industry users are interested in simulations such as the interaction of multiple antennas in cellular phone devices or the tuning of magnetic resonance imaging coils. In Phase I the concept was validated by simulating a multi-stage radio circuit connected to a monopole antenna. For Phase II the product will be refined to functionality of the circuit solver will be integrated into the full wave solver, creating a unified tool Validation of the solver will be provided against measurements such as the co-site interference problem of nearby radios. The effort will combine the multi-physics circuit simulator, fREEDA, with the full wave commercial software product, XFdtd.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Army | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 748.90K | Year: 2010

The goal of this effort is to create a hybrid software product that combines a full wave electromagnetic solver with a sophisticated circuit simulator creating an engineering tool that is capable of simulating the complete system of complex electronic devices. This tool will be powerful asset for a wide variety of government and industry users for applications that combine field and circuit interaction such as radio design, co-site interference, and active tuning. Government applications could include the co-location of multiple transmitters on a vehicle or the impact of electromagnetic pulse on circuitry while industry users are interested in simulations such as the interaction of multiple antennas in cellular phone devices or the tuning of magnetic resonance imaging coils. In Phase I the concept was validated by simulating a multi-stage radio circuit connected to a monopole antenna. For Phase II the product will be refined to functionality of the circuit solver will be integrated into the full wave solver, creating a unified tool Validation of the solver will be provided against measurements such as the co-site interference problem of nearby radios. The effort will combine the multi-physics circuit simulator, fREEDA, with the full wave commercial software product, XFdtd.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 98.71K | Year: 2011

The objective of this topic is to rapidly and efficiently develop mobile applications (apps) for handheld devices and to demonstrate their utility in a number of military domains. Remcom proposes to develop within the TIGR environment a handheld app for the Android device that will provide real time mapping of various RF propagation (communications) performance parameters in urban, rural and littoral environments for fixed and mobile assets. The app will provide maps of communications/jammer coverage and link analysis to known remote assets from the user"s location. The app will update periodically based on movement or planned routes and the user will be able to toggle views. The app will leverage compass and GPS inputs and provide location-sensitive and heading-sensitive map data containing overlays of various real time data in the form of color-coded regions and icons. The objectives of Phase I are: assess the Android platform for EM modeling performance; research the requirements, capabilities and API of the TIGR environment; determine the required client/server architecture; determine the mix of C++ and Java modules needed to support the application; create a design for the non-TIGR version of the app; create a preliminary design for integration into TIGR; and implement and test the non-TIGR prototype app. Phase I option objectives are: produce a final design of a prototype TIGR version of the app; and begin integration of the RF propagation app into TIGR.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Army | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 727.77K | Year: 2012

The ability to model complex systems relevant to EW defeat scenarios requires a knowledgeable user to decompose analyses into a set of individual phenomena for separate analysis. There are no end-to-end models that can appropriately model all aspects of the problem and coherently bring them together into an accurate solution. This results in two key disadvantages: (1) The required multi-step simulations are time consuming (2) The approach requires expertise across several tools and techniques A Scenario-Based Electronic Systems Modeling tool will eliminate the need for a knowledgeable user to run each simulation, reducing execution time and errors. The tool will encapsulate the models, decompose electronic system emplacement scenarios into separate problem spaces, and recommend selections from a suite of COTS EM models best suited to each regime. It will execute joint simulations using multiple physics techniques and complex interfaces, and display the results through a user-friendly GUI. The tool will also provide substantial acceleration and advanced capabilities for auto-generation of inputs and tradeoff simulations. This new capability will improve the Armys ability to develop effective defeat solutions in a timelier manner, and can be used by general users for a variety of system and operational level electronics system scenarios.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Air Force | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 149.03K | Year: 2012

ABSTRACT: A hybrid computational Electromagnetic solution will be developed that combines techniques in order to handle far-field propagation, near-field interactions, and detailed interactions with complex objects, such as human anatomical models, while taking advantage of the computational power of graphics processing units (GPU). The approach will leverage existing, mature physics models with demonstrated capabilities, existing GPU acceleration, and mature graphical user interfaces. Research will be performed into alternative approaches to determine the best method for interfacing the two computational techniques. Specific enhancements to GPU capabilities will be identified and assessed to provide additional acceleration for scenarios of interest. The final solution will be a full end-to-end modeling tool that provides high-fidelity and optimal run times, with seamless interfaces between the physics techniques, and a unified, user-friendly graphical interface that allows setup, execution, and visualization of outputs. BENEFIT: The outcome of this SBIR will be a modeling suite that seamlessly integrates high-fidelity electromagnetic simulation in the near-field of antennas and in the vicinity of human anatomical models, with high-fidelity propagation calculations over rough terrain or within urban settings. Antenna designers, engineers, and health physicists could use this tool to assess health and safety risks in a variety of environments by determining the potential for radiation exposure to personnel. Its hybrid capabilities would allow it to be used to perform detailed assessments of fields or specific absorption rate (SAR) for near-field analysis or far-field analysis, well beyond the range where high-fidelity calculations would normally be feasible. GPU and other acceleration techniques would ensure reasonably optimal run times for calculations that would otherwise take significant time to complete. The combined set of capabilities also has potential for use in other fields, providing the capability to perform high fidelity electromagnetic analysis near any type of complex object within relatively large-scale problem sizes.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Air Force | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 149.95K | Year: 2012

ABSTRACT: A new thermal response module will be developed for the XFdtd electromagnetic full-wave solver, building on versions that were available in prior releases of the software to incorporate accuracy and new features from the latest approaches in the technical literature. A user-friendly graphical user interface will also be developed in XFdtd 7 for setting up and executing simulations and visualizing results. The computational method behind the software tool is based on the accurate bio-heat transfer equation. The improved computational tool will be more accurate and efficient, and will better meet the needs of military and commercial users of XFdtd. Semi-analytical models will also be investigated and prototyped using accurate simulation results from the high-fidelity thermal module and will be integrated into the software. The development of a MPI and GPU accelerated version will greatly improve the efficiency and reduce the runtime. The goal of this research will provide a fast tool to predict both whole body and localized temperatures over time across a broad range of individuals and exposures. BENEFIT: Military Application: The software tool developed by this SBIR effort can be used by engineers and health physicists to study risks of accidental RF overexposure. It can also be used by military to predict potential of overexposure during engagement of novel directed energy systems. Commercial Application: This research effort will improve the temperature rise modules that were available in prior versions of XFdtd and allow us to integrate the new capability into our current version, XFdtd Release 7. The success of the proposed project will introduce a new and improved feature to Remcom"s XFdtd product which will allow for thermal and hazard analysis of biological bodies under RF exposure. This is also something that some of Remcom"s current and prospective commercial customers have asked for. The application includes but is not limited to the risks of accidental RF overexposure, hyperthermia treatment, human thermal comfort research, and the safety issues of MRI and wireless devices such as cell phones.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Navy | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 79.60K | Year: 2013

High-fidelity predictions of the radar cross sections of ships at sea at X-band and above are complicated by the presence of interactions between the important scattering objects on the ship, with sizes comparable to a few wavelengths, and the larger structures of the ship which are electrically large. Interactions with the ocean surface are also important. Different electromagnetic analysis techniques are required for the small and large structures, and so the use of a single technique will either be computationally prohibitive (in the case of full-wave techniques suited for small structures) or inaccurate (in the case of high-frequency asymptotic solutions for large structures). In the proposed Phase I project, we will use a hybrid technique that combines regions where a full-wave solver is applied with regions where a high-frequency solver is applied, overcoming the limitations of using a single technique for both. This work will build on a previous successful prototype of this basic concept for simpler systems involving only one small object, using Remcom's commercial XFdtd (full-wave) and XGtd (high-frequency) EM analysis software. After feasibility is demonstrated in Phase I, the prototype hybrid solver will be developed into a commercial product in Phase II.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Navy | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 79.93K | Year: 2014

An innovative, new adaptive signal processing solution is proposed for mitigation of the impact that wind turbine clutter has on airborne radar performance. Electromagnetic simulations are used to predict radar returns in the presence of wind turbine scattering, terrain multipath, and clutter from terrain and sea surfaces, not only for use in assessment of the solution, but also as a part of the intelligent mitigation approach, providing a method for training the algorithms for a wide variety of conditions and environments. Building on previous work for ground-based radar, the approach employs methods for handling the dynamic clutter environment in airborne operation, and techniques to rapidly adapt and train as new regions enter the radar field of view. The final solution will be a knowledge-aided process, that identifies key features of wind turbine clutter and applies adaptive algorithms to improve radar probability of detection and reduce probability of false alarms.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Air Force | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 149.79K | Year: 2013

ABSTRACT: A high-fidelity computational electromagnetic solution will be developed that directly solves Maxwell"s equations in order to calculate radar returns from complex, electrically large objects in motion, such as wind turbines with rotating blades. The solution will include propagation effects from terrain and atmosphere, multipath between object parts, and the details of interior and exterior construction to capture all critical aspects of scattering from objects constructed of thin, dielectric materials. Hardware acceleration and parallel-processing capabilities will be incorporated to ensure efficient execution of simulation sets used to characterize the dynamic nature of the radar returns. Simulated returns will then be used in concert with measured returns to train an innovative and adaptive signal processing methodology which can then be used in real-time to mitigate the clutter impacts with the objective of improving probability of detection. The final solution will be a knowledge-aided, site-specific process, that can take advantage of known object locations and measured or simulated radar clutter returns to improve radar performance in the presence of complex cluttered environments. BENEFIT: The outcome of this STTR will be a comprehensive capability to mitigate complex radar clutter through two complementary capabilities: (1) an end-to-end simulation tool that can predict the impact of wind turbines and other complex structures on radar returns with high fidelity, and (2) an adaptive signal processing solution that mitigates wind turbine clutter, and can be trained by a combination of measured data and results from the simulation tool. This has the potential to significantly benefit air traffic control and air force radar installations, by improving their ability to detect aircraft in the presence of such clutter. Over time, the existence of such capabilities may also help to allow proposed wind farm projects that would have previously been denied due to the concern of potential radar interference, to now be allowed to proceed with radar mitigation technology in place to prevent adverse impacts. Finally, a new, high-fidelity radar scattering modeling and simulation capability will provide a new tool for engineers in the radar community to assist with predictions of effectiveness in the presence of complex terrain, atmosphere, and clutter conditions.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Air Force | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 748.61K | Year: 2013

ABSTRACT: A hybrid computational Electromagnetic solution will be developed that combines multiple physics techniques in order to handle far-field propagation, near-field interactions, and detailed interactions with complex objects, such as human anatomical models, while taking advantage of the computational power of graphics processing units (GPU) and other optimizations. The approach will leverage existing, mature physics models with demonstrated capabilities, existing GPU acceleration, and mature graphical user interfaces. Physics interfaces prototyped and demonstrated in Phase I will be fully implemented and integrated into the code baselines. Acceleration and optimization techniques tuned to the problem will be implemented, benchmarked, and verified. A preliminary hybrid graphical user interface will be developed to allow setup, execution and visualization of hybrid computational EM simulation results. The final solution will be a full end-to-end modeling tool that provides high-fidelity and optimal run times, with seamless interfaces between the physics techniques, controlled through an integrated, user-friendly graphical user interface. BENEFIT: The outcome of this SBIR will be a modeling suite that seamlessly integrates high-fidelity electromagnetic simulation in the near-field of antennas and in the vicinity of human anatomical models, with high-fidelity propagation calculations over rough terrain or within urban settings. Antenna designers, engineers, and health physicists could use this tool to assess health and safety risks in a variety of environments by determining the potential for radiation exposure to personnel. Its hybrid capabilities will allow it to be used to perform detailed assessments of fields or specific absorption rate (SAR) for near-field analysis or far-field analysis, well beyond the range where high-fidelity calculations would be feasible with current modeling solutions. GPU and other acceleration techniques will ensure reasonably optimal run times for calculations that would otherwise take significant time to complete. The combined set of capabilities also has potential for use in other fields, providing the capability to perform high fidelity electromagnetic analysis near any type of complex object.

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