Entity

Time filter

Source Type

Trondheim, Norway

Reinertsen is a civil engineering, construction, and petroleum industry supply company based in Trondheim, Norway. It was established in 1946 and remains family-owned. Its CEO is Erik Reinertsen and chairman is Torkil R. Reinertsen. In 2011, Reinertsen had a revenue of €400 million and 2,100 employees. It has offices in Trondeim, Orkanger, Oslo, Bergen, Gothenburg, Stockholm, Murmansk and Szczecin . Wikipedia.


Reinertsen D.,Reinertsen AS
IPAC 2011 - 2nd International Particle Accelerator Conference | Year: 2011

New methods are transforming the way organizations develop complex systems which contain advanced technology. In the past, organizations used sequential development processes which required one stage to be entirely complete before the next one started. Now they are shifting to processes that handle work in small batches. These small batches accelerate valuable feedback and reduce the size of in-process queues. Smaller queues unlock simultaneous improvements in quality, efficiency, and cycle time. This new approach is sometimes called lean product development because of its similarity to the ideas of lean manufacturing. This paper will introduce readers to some of the key concepts underlying lean product development and explain their relevance to the design of systems like particle accelerators. Copyright © 2011 by IPAC'11/EPS-AG.


Maheswaran J.,Reinertsen AS | Siriwardane S.C.,University of Stavanger
Fatigue and Fracture of Engineering Materials and Structures | Year: 2016

In fatigue analysis, the structural detail of tubular joint has taken great attention among engineers. The DNV/GL-RP-0005 is covering this topic quite well for simple and clear joint cases. For complex joint and geometry, where joint classification is not available and there is limitation on validity range of non-dimensional geometric parameters, the challenges become a fact among engineers. The classification of joint is an important factor to consider in fatigue analysis. These joint configurations are identified by the connectivity and the load distribution of tubular joints. To overcome these problems to some extent, this paper compares the fatigue life of tubular joints in offshore jacket according to the stress concentration factors (SCF) in DNV/GL-RP-0005 and finite element method employed in Abaqus/CAE. The paper presents the geometric details, material properties and load history of the considered jacket structure. It then describes the global structural analysis and identification of critical tubular joints for fatigue life estimation. Hence, fatigue life is determined based on the guidelines provided in design codes. Fatigue analysis of tubular joints is conducted using the finite element employed in Abaqus/CAE as the next major step. Finally, predicted SCFs and fatigue lives are compared, and these observations tend to conclude that even though the fatigue life, which is calculated based on code given SCFs, provides more realistic prediction to the simple uniplanar joints, there is a doubt for complex joints and geometry, where joint classification is not available. Also, the study emphasized that it is very important to preciously investigate SCFs by considering accurate geometry of complex tubular joints for a good judgement of fatigue life. © 2015 Wiley Publishing Ltd.


Bjornsson I.,Lund University | Thelandersson S.,Lund University | Carlsson F.,Reinertsen AS
Journal of Bridge Engineering | Year: 2016

The design and verification of built structures requires structural engineers to consider accidental loading situations. The accidental loading situation investigated in this paper is heavy-goods vehicle (HGV) collisions with roadside structures; focus is on the design of bridge-supporting structures. The impact loads were determined from Monte Carlo simulations of a probabilistic model in which highway traffic measurements and accident statistics in Sweden are input. These loads were calculated for structures adjacent to straight roads as well as roads with curvature, and include considerations of the directional load components. Comparisons were made between the simulation results and approaches given in design codes, with focus on the Eurocode. The simplified approaches provided in the code were inadequate in their treatment of these design situations. Alternative equations for calculating impact forces and energies are presented. These equations can be used for determining design values for impact forces or for conducting probability/risk-based assessments of bridge supports subjected to HGV impacts. In this way, a more consistent treatment of HGV impacts in the design of bridge structures is achieved. © 2015 American Society of Civil Engineers.


Maheswaran J.,Reinertsen AS | Siriwardane S.C.,University of Stavanger
IABSE Conference, Geneva 2015: Structural Engineering: Providing Solutions to Global Challenges - Report | Year: 2015

The stress concentration factors of tubular joints have taken great attention among engineers. The DNV/GL-RP-0005 is covering this topic quite well for simple and clear joint cases. For complex joint and geometry, where joint classification isn't available and limitation on validity range of non-dimensional geometric parameters, the challenges become a fact among engineers. The classification of joint is important for the fatigue analysis. These joint configurations are identified by the connectivity and the load distribution of tubular joints. To overcome these problems to some extent, this paper compares the SCFs which were obtained by parametric equations given in DNV/GL-RP-0005, finite element analysis and full scale experimental test results of four different types of tubular joints in offshore jackets. Finally, the validity and limitation of each method are discussed.


Eiksund G.,Norwegian University of Science and Technology | Lango H.,GeoPartner Marin AS | Hove F.,Reinertsen AS
International Journal of Offshore and Polar Engineering | Year: 2013

Offshore pipelines for transport of hot oil and gas are exposed to thermal expansion/contraction during startup of and shutdown of production. A method for controlling the feed-in of pipe to locations with lateral or upheaval buckling is to install berms of crushed rock providing axial locking. To improve the basis for an optimized design of the axial locking berms, a full-scale axial friction test program has been performed. This paper presents the test setup, rock materials, pipe properties and the results from the friction test. Recommendations are given for friction coefficients between crushed rock and uncoated steel pipes and pipes coated with concrete and poly propylene. © by The International Society of Offshore and Polar Engineers.

Discover hidden collaborations