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San Francesco al Campo, Italy

Neasham D.,Imperial College London | Sifi A.,Imperial College London | Nielsen K.R.,Aarhus University Hospital | Overvad K.,Aarhus University Hospital | And 34 more authors.
Occupational and Environmental Medicine | Year: 2011

Objectives: Evidence suggests that certain occupations and related exposures may increase the risk of malignant lymphoma. Farming, printing and paper industry, wood processing, meat handling and processing, welding, shoe and leather manufacturing and teaching profession are among the categories that have been implicated in previous studies. The relationship between occupation and malignant lymphoma has been investigated in a large European prospective study. Methods: We investigated occupational risks for lymphomas in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). The mean follow-up time for 348 555 subjects was 9 years (SD: 2 years). The analysis was based on 866 and 48 newly diagnosed cases of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) and Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL). These were identified in the EPIC subcohorts with occupational data. Data on 52 occupations were collected through standardised questionnaires. Cox proportional hazard models were used to explore the association between occupation and risk of malignant lymphoma. Results: The following occupations were positively associated with malignant NHL after adjustment for study centre, age, sex, socioeconomic status (SES), smoking and alcohol: butchers (HR=1.53, 95% CI 1.05 to 2.48, including multiple myeloma/plasmacytoma; HR=1.30, 95% CI 1.00 to 2.66, excluding multiple myeloma/plasmacytoma) and car repair workers (HR=1.50, 95% CI 1.01 to 2.00, including multiple myeloma/plasmacytoma; HR=1.51, 95% CI 1.01 to 2.31, excluding multiple myeloma/plasmacytoma). HL was associated with gasoline station occupation (HR=4.59, 95% CI 1.08 to 19.6). Conclusion: The findings in this current study of a higher risk of NHL among car repair workers and butchers and a higher risk of HL among gasoline station workers suggest a possible role from occupationally related exposures, such as solvents and zoonotic viruses, as risk factors for malignant lymphoma. Source


Murali R.,Tissue Pathology and Diagnostic Oncology | Murali R.,Melanoma Institute Australia | Murali R.,University of Sydney | Murali R.,Sloan Kettering Cancer Center | And 18 more authors.
Annals of Surgical Oncology | Year: 2012

Background. 0.6-12.7% of patients with primary cutaneous melanoma will develop additional melanomas. Pathologic features of tumors in patients with multiple primary cutaneous melanomas have not been well described. In this large, international, multicenter, case-control study, we compared the clinicopathologic features of a subsequent melanoma with the preceding (usually the first) melanoma in patientswith multiple primary cutaneous melanomas, and with those of melanomas in patients with single primary cutaneous melanomas. Methods. Multiple primary melanoma (cases) and single primary invasive melanoma (controls) patients from the Genes, Environment and Melanoma (GEM) study were included if their tumors were available for pathologic review and confirmed as melanoma. Clinicopathologic characteristics of invasive subsequent and first melanomas in cases and invasive single melanomas in controls were compared. Results. A total of 473 pairs comprising a subsequent and a first melanoma and 1,989 single melanomas were reviewed. Forward stepwise regression modeling in 395 pairs with complete data showed that, compared with first melanomas, subsequent melanomas were more commonly contiguous with a dysplastic nevus, more prevalent on the head/neck and legs than other sites, and thinner. Compared with single primary melanomas, subsequent melanomas were more likely to be associated with a contiguous dysplastic nevus, more prevalent on the head/neck and legs, and thinner. The same differences were observed when subsequent melanomas were compared with single melanomas. First melanomas were more likely than single melanomas to have associated solar elastosis and no observed mitoses. Conclusions. Thinner subsequent than first melanomas suggest earlier diagnosis, perhaps due to closer clinical scrutiny. The association of subsequent melanomas with dysplastic nevi is consistent with the latter being risk factors or risk markers for melanoma. © Society of Surgical Oncology 2011. Source

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