Registered Dietitian

United Kingdom

Registered Dietitian

United Kingdom
SEARCH FILTERS
Time filter
Source Type

News Article | May 16, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

Americans are consuming food information from more sources than ever before, yet our nutritional literacy is sorely lacking—and our health may be suffering as a result. Those are among the findings of the International Food Information Council Foundation’s 12th Annual Food and Health Survey. “As in previous years, the Food and Health Survey has shown that Americans feel overwhelmed by conflicting food and nutrition information,” said IFIC Foundation CEO Joseph Clayton. “But this year, we’re finding troubling signs that the information glut is translating into faulty decisions about our diets and health.” “As policymakers work to revise the Nutrition Facts panel and define ‘healthy’ on food labels, it’s more crucial than ever before that we empower consumers with accurate information based on the best available science, in terms they can easily understand and put into action.” The vast majority of consumers—eight in 10 (78 percent)—say that they encounter a lot of conflicting information about what to eat/avoid. More than half of those (56 percent) say the conflicting information makes them doubt the choices they make. Almost all consumers (96 percent) seek out health benefits from what they eat and drink (the top benefits being weight loss, cardiovascular health, energy, and digestive health), but out of those, only 45 percent could identify a single food or nutrient associated with those benefits. For example, while sources of omega-3 fatty acids such as fish oil can contribute to heart health, just 12 percent made an association between them. In addition, while people are interested in getting energy benefits, less than 5 percent could name caffeine as providing those benefits. The “Social Network”: Family and Friends As Nutrition Advisers So why are we confused? For one, despite their best intentions, the people we’re closest to might actually be leading us astray. In short, consumers paradoxically rely heavily on information from individuals—family and friends—for whom there is little trust. About three-quarters of consumers (77 percent) say they rely on friends and family at least a little for both nutrition and food safety information, which tops other sources including health professionals, news, and the internet. But only 29 percent actually have high trust in family or friends as information sources, far behind sources such as Registered Dietitian Nutritionists, other health or fitness professionals, and health-related websites. Meanwhile, six in 10 consumers (59 percent) rated family and friends as the top influencer on decisions about their eating patterns or diets. Personal healthcare professionals were cited by 55 percent of consumers, while all other sources rated only in the single digits. The Food and Health Survey also suggests that consumers might be paying too much or making flawed decisions about nutrition because of non-health factors—or mental shortcuts— that drastically alter our perception of what is healthful. These factors include the form of the food (fresh, frozen, canned), place of purchase (e.g., convenience store vs. natural food store), the length of the ingredient list, and price, among others —and they drive perceptions of healthfulness even between two foods with identical nutrition information. For example, even with nutritionally identical products, consumers are almost five times as likely to believe a fresh product is healthier than canned and four times as likely to believe a fresh product is healthier than frozen.  Consumers also are more likely to believe a product that costs $2 is healthier than an otherwise identical product that costs 99 cents. For years, some influencers have driven home messages conflating nutrition with non-health values, and now consumers are paying the price—literally, or at the expense of other desired factors such as convenience or shelf life. As people age, their nutrition needs and dietary preferences change. But few have examined the shopping habits and eating patterns of Americans ages 50-plus—the country’s fastest-growing demographic. That’s why the IFIC Foundation, in collaboration with AARP Foundation, conducted an oversample of respondents ages 50–80 for the 2017 Food and Health Survey to help uncover insights into the diets and health of older Americans. Compared with other segments of the population, those age 50–80 … Meanwhile, Americans’ interest in getting weight-loss benefits from food and nutrients falls dramatically with age. Weight loss and management are far and away the most desired benefit, at 40 percent among those 18 – 34 and 38 percent from 35 – 49, but that drops to 23 percent from age 50 – 64 and 28 percent from 65 – 80. The desire for foods and nutrients with cardiovascular benefits increases with age, from 11 percent ages 35 – 49 to 23 percent ages 50 – 64. Confidence in the safety of the food supply increases significantly with age, with 55 percent from 18 – 49 saying they’re confident, 66 percent from 50 – 64, and 76 percent from 65 – 80. The results are derived from an online survey of 1,002 Americans ages 18 – 80, conducted March 10 to March 29, 2017. Results were weighted to ensure that they are reflective of the American population, as seen in the 2016 Current Population Survey.  Specifically, they were weighted by age, education, gender, race/ethnicity, and region. The survey was conducted by Greenwald & Associates, using ResearchNow’s consumer panel. The mission of International Food Information Council Foundation, a 501(c)(3) nonprofit, is to effectively communicate science-based information on health, food safety, and nutrition for the public good. The IFIC Foundation is supported primarily by the broad-based food, beverage and agricultural industries. Visit http://www.foodinsight.org. A photo accompanying this announcement is available at http://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/c6fba31e-bcfb-4fb7-9aa2-fc41b5ae004c A photo accompanying this announcement is available at http://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/9b4ed39a-db12-4157-ad1f-cd51d46224f6 A photo accompanying this announcement is available at http://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/2d4fbc0b-2312-4abe-886f-f3898622c5c8


Registered Dietitian and former Miss Indiana Betsy Opyt will present on Nutrient Dense & Gluten Free Foods at the GFAF Expo in Atlanta, GA, May 20-21, 2017. Betsy is Founder and CEO of Naples, FL-based Betsy's Best® Gourmet Nut & Seed Butters.


News Article | May 16, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

Americans are consuming food information from more sources than ever before, yet our nutritional literacy is sorely lacking—and our health may be suffering as a result. Those are among the findings of the International Food Information Council Foundation’s 12th Annual Food and Health Survey. “As in previous years, the Food and Health Survey has shown that Americans feel overwhelmed by conflicting food and nutrition information,” said IFIC Foundation CEO Joseph Clayton. “But this year, we’re finding troubling signs that the information glut is translating into faulty decisions about our diets and health.” “As policymakers work to revise the Nutrition Facts panel and define ‘healthy’ on food labels, it’s more crucial than ever before that we empower consumers with accurate information based on the best available science, in terms they can easily understand and put into action.” The vast majority of consumers—eight in 10 (78 percent)—say that they encounter a lot of conflicting information about what to eat/avoid. More than half of those (56 percent) say the conflicting information makes them doubt the choices they make. Almost all consumers (96 percent) seek out health benefits from what they eat and drink (the top benefits being weight loss, cardiovascular health, energy, and digestive health), but out of those, only 45 percent could identify a single food or nutrient associated with those benefits. For example, while sources of omega-3 fatty acids such as fish oil can contribute to heart health, just 12 percent made an association between them. In addition, while people are interested in getting energy benefits, less than 5 percent could name caffeine as providing those benefits. The “Social Network”: Family and Friends As Nutrition Advisers So why are we confused? For one, despite their best intentions, the people we’re closest to might actually be leading us astray. In short, consumers paradoxically rely heavily on information from individuals—family and friends—for whom there is little trust. About three-quarters of consumers (77 percent) say they rely on friends and family at least a little for both nutrition and food safety information, which tops other sources including health professionals, news, and the internet. But only 29 percent actually have high trust in family or friends as information sources, far behind sources such as Registered Dietitian Nutritionists, other health or fitness professionals, and health-related websites. Meanwhile, six in 10 consumers (59 percent) rated family and friends as the top influencer on decisions about their eating patterns or diets. Personal healthcare professionals were cited by 55 percent of consumers, while all other sources rated only in the single digits. The Food and Health Survey also suggests that consumers might be paying too much or making flawed decisions about nutrition because of non-health factors—or mental shortcuts— that drastically alter our perception of what is healthful. These factors include the form of the food (fresh, frozen, canned), place of purchase (e.g., convenience store vs. natural food store), the length of the ingredient list, and price, among others —and they drive perceptions of healthfulness even between two foods with identical nutrition information. For example, even with nutritionally identical products, consumers are almost five times as likely to believe a fresh product is healthier than canned and four times as likely to believe a fresh product is healthier than frozen.  Consumers also are more likely to believe a product that costs $2 is healthier than an otherwise identical product that costs 99 cents. For years, some influencers have driven home messages conflating nutrition with non-health values, and now consumers are paying the price—literally, or at the expense of other desired factors such as convenience or shelf life. As people age, their nutrition needs and dietary preferences change. But few have examined the shopping habits and eating patterns of Americans ages 50-plus—the country’s fastest-growing demographic. That’s why the IFIC Foundation, in collaboration with AARP Foundation, conducted an oversample of respondents ages 50–80 for the 2017 Food and Health Survey to help uncover insights into the diets and health of older Americans. Compared with other segments of the population, those age 50–80 … Meanwhile, Americans’ interest in getting weight-loss benefits from food and nutrients falls dramatically with age. Weight loss and management are far and away the most desired benefit, at 40 percent among those 18 – 34 and 38 percent from 35 – 49, but that drops to 23 percent from age 50 – 64 and 28 percent from 65 – 80. The desire for foods and nutrients with cardiovascular benefits increases with age, from 11 percent ages 35 – 49 to 23 percent ages 50 – 64. Confidence in the safety of the food supply increases significantly with age, with 55 percent from 18 – 49 saying they’re confident, 66 percent from 50 – 64, and 76 percent from 65 – 80. The results are derived from an online survey of 1,002 Americans ages 18 – 80, conducted March 10 to March 29, 2017. Results were weighted to ensure that they are reflective of the American population, as seen in the 2016 Current Population Survey.  Specifically, they were weighted by age, education, gender, race/ethnicity, and region. The survey was conducted by Greenwald & Associates, using ResearchNow’s consumer panel. The mission of International Food Information Council Foundation, a 501(c)(3) nonprofit, is to effectively communicate science-based information on health, food safety, and nutrition for the public good. The IFIC Foundation is supported primarily by the broad-based food, beverage and agricultural industries. Visit http://www.foodinsight.org. A photo accompanying this announcement is available at http://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/c6fba31e-bcfb-4fb7-9aa2-fc41b5ae004c A photo accompanying this announcement is available at http://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/9b4ed39a-db12-4157-ad1f-cd51d46224f6 A photo accompanying this announcement is available at http://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/2d4fbc0b-2312-4abe-886f-f3898622c5c8


News Article | May 16, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

Americans are consuming food information from more sources than ever before, yet our nutritional literacy is sorely lacking—and our health may be suffering as a result. Those are among the findings of the International Food Information Council Foundation’s 12th Annual Food and Health Survey. “As in previous years, the Food and Health Survey has shown that Americans feel overwhelmed by conflicting food and nutrition information,” said IFIC Foundation CEO Joseph Clayton. “But this year, we’re finding troubling signs that the information glut is translating into faulty decisions about our diets and health.” “As policymakers work to revise the Nutrition Facts panel and define ‘healthy’ on food labels, it’s more crucial than ever before that we empower consumers with accurate information based on the best available science, in terms they can easily understand and put into action.” The vast majority of consumers—eight in 10 (78 percent)—say that they encounter a lot of conflicting information about what to eat/avoid. More than half of those (56 percent) say the conflicting information makes them doubt the choices they make. Almost all consumers (96 percent) seek out health benefits from what they eat and drink (the top benefits being weight loss, cardiovascular health, energy, and digestive health), but out of those, only 45 percent could identify a single food or nutrient associated with those benefits. For example, while sources of omega-3 fatty acids such as fish oil can contribute to heart health, just 12 percent made an association between them. In addition, while people are interested in getting energy benefits, less than 5 percent could name caffeine as providing those benefits. The “Social Network”: Family and Friends As Nutrition Advisers So why are we confused? For one, despite their best intentions, the people we’re closest to might actually be leading us astray. In short, consumers paradoxically rely heavily on information from individuals—family and friends—for whom there is little trust. About three-quarters of consumers (77 percent) say they rely on friends and family at least a little for both nutrition and food safety information, which tops other sources including health professionals, news, and the internet. But only 29 percent actually have high trust in family or friends as information sources, far behind sources such as Registered Dietitian Nutritionists, other health or fitness professionals, and health-related websites. Meanwhile, six in 10 consumers (59 percent) rated family and friends as the top influencer on decisions about their eating patterns or diets. Personal healthcare professionals were cited by 55 percent of consumers, while all other sources rated only in the single digits. The Food and Health Survey also suggests that consumers might be paying too much or making flawed decisions about nutrition because of non-health factors—or mental shortcuts— that drastically alter our perception of what is healthful. These factors include the form of the food (fresh, frozen, canned), place of purchase (e.g., convenience store vs. natural food store), the length of the ingredient list, and price, among others —and they drive perceptions of healthfulness even between two foods with identical nutrition information. For example, even with nutritionally identical products, consumers are almost five times as likely to believe a fresh product is healthier than canned and four times as likely to believe a fresh product is healthier than frozen.  Consumers also are more likely to believe a product that costs $2 is healthier than an otherwise identical product that costs 99 cents. For years, some influencers have driven home messages conflating nutrition with non-health values, and now consumers are paying the price—literally, or at the expense of other desired factors such as convenience or shelf life. As people age, their nutrition needs and dietary preferences change. But few have examined the shopping habits and eating patterns of Americans ages 50-plus—the country’s fastest-growing demographic. That’s why the IFIC Foundation, in collaboration with AARP Foundation, conducted an oversample of respondents ages 50–80 for the 2017 Food and Health Survey to help uncover insights into the diets and health of older Americans. Compared with other segments of the population, those age 50–80 … Meanwhile, Americans’ interest in getting weight-loss benefits from food and nutrients falls dramatically with age. Weight loss and management are far and away the most desired benefit, at 40 percent among those 18 – 34 and 38 percent from 35 – 49, but that drops to 23 percent from age 50 – 64 and 28 percent from 65 – 80. The desire for foods and nutrients with cardiovascular benefits increases with age, from 11 percent ages 35 – 49 to 23 percent ages 50 – 64. Confidence in the safety of the food supply increases significantly with age, with 55 percent from 18 – 49 saying they’re confident, 66 percent from 50 – 64, and 76 percent from 65 – 80. The results are derived from an online survey of 1,002 Americans ages 18 – 80, conducted March 10 to March 29, 2017. Results were weighted to ensure that they are reflective of the American population, as seen in the 2016 Current Population Survey.  Specifically, they were weighted by age, education, gender, race/ethnicity, and region. The survey was conducted by Greenwald & Associates, using ResearchNow’s consumer panel. The mission of International Food Information Council Foundation, a 501(c)(3) nonprofit, is to effectively communicate science-based information on health, food safety, and nutrition for the public good. The IFIC Foundation is supported primarily by the broad-based food, beverage and agricultural industries. Visit http://www.foodinsight.org. A photo accompanying this announcement is available at http://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/c6fba31e-bcfb-4fb7-9aa2-fc41b5ae004c A photo accompanying this announcement is available at http://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/9b4ed39a-db12-4157-ad1f-cd51d46224f6 A photo accompanying this announcement is available at http://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/2d4fbc0b-2312-4abe-886f-f3898622c5c8


News Article | May 16, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.com

"We know everyone is busy and active and they are looking for ways to support not only their health, but their energy," explains associate marketing director for Culturelle® Fan Bonnett. "With so many Americans going through the day tired, with less energy, we wanted to provide a caffeine alternative that supports not only your energy, but your immunity—which also plays an important role in your energy levels.*^ This led us to combine these key vitamins with Lactobacillus GG creating a formula that's perfect for those who strive to live their lives to the fullest!" Registered Dietitian, Brooke Alpert^^ explains, "Many of my clients are looking for ways to boost their energy levels to keep up with their busy lives. The three pieces of advice I always give them are, watch your sugar intake, stay hydrated and support your digestive health. When I learned about new Culturelle® Pro-well® Immune + Energy, I knew that I would be recommending it as a daily supplement." Pro-well® Immune + Energy Formula, is safe for everyday and long-term use. This non-GMO, caffeine-, gluten-†, dairy-± and sugar-free††† formula can help support hydration, immune health and energy levels*^—all in just one powder packet. Culturelle® Pro-well® Immune + Energy is available nationally in the vitamin aisle at a suggested retail price of $25.99 for 20 single serving packets. For more information about new Culturelle® Pro-well® Immune + Energy and to secure a $5 coupon, visit https://www.culturelle.com/coupons/save-5-pro-well. About Culturelle® Probiotics Culturelle® is a leading national probiotic brand†† with a portfolio of products trusted to deliver digestive and immune support to American families from children to adults.* Culturelle® contains the most clinically studied probiotic strain, Lactobacillus GG, ≠ which has been demonstrated in over 1,000 scientific studies and 200 clinical studies to restore the natural balance of "good" bacteria in the digestive tract to help alleviate occasional digestive distress as well as support the body's natural defenses.*  Culturelle® also encourages adults to support their overall health and wellness—now and long-term—with its Pro-well® line by offering choices that help support energy, heart and immune health.* ^ *These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. 1http://www.king5.com/news/local/survey-shows-american-workers-are-exhausted/422188979 ^^Brooke Alpert is a paid spokesperson for Culturelle®.  ††Based on Culturelle® Brand Nielsen xAOC 52 weeks ending January 21, 2017. ≠Based on the number of clinical/scientific studies of Lactobacillus GG as of May 2016. †Meets the FDA's guidelines for gluten-free. †††Contains sucrose which adds a dietarily insignificant amount of sugar. Not a reduced calorie food. ± While there are no dairy-derived ingredients in this product, it is produced in a facility that also handles dairy ingredients. ^B-vitamins support energy through metabolic function. Culturelle® is distributed by i-Health, Inc. Culturelle® and Pro-well® are trademarks of DSM. © i-Health, Inc. 2017. All rights reserved. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/culturelle-expands-probiotic-offering-to-all-day-energy-support-300457937.html


News Article | May 4, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.com

Vital Proteins' collection of clean, sustainably sourced collagen proteins range from single ingredient powders such as the grass-fed, pasture-raised Collagen Peptides and Beef Gelatin (a staple of the Chicago Cubs' clubhouse menu) to multi-ingredient blends such as the Collagen Whey (offering 27 g of protein per serving). Providing the optimal dose of collagen per serving, these products are an important part of an athlete's diet offering tendon, ligament, and bone support to increase performance and reduce risk of injury. Studies involving professional athletes have further proven collagen's effectiveness, showing a 67% reduction in injury among participants. Not surprisingly, Vital Proteins has been in-play behind the scenes of the clubhouse for several years, an introduction made by Chicago Cubs Nutrition Consultant, Registered Dietitian Nutritionist (RDN) and Certified Specialist in Sports Dietetics (CSSD), Dawn Jackson Blatner. "I am relentless when it comes to making sure the players have access to the most cutting-edge nutrition," explains Blatner, who has been a nutrition consultant of the Chicago Cubs for nearly ten years. "Collagen is an exciting new element in sports nutrition; it helps keep active bodies strong and resilient, which is exactly what I want for the players." In addition to being named the Official Collagen of the Chicago Cubs for the 2017-2018 baseball season, Vital Proteins is committed to supporting the team's players in every way possible, as well as their fans. From signage in the stadium to citywide in-store promotions, fans will have an opportunity to interact with the Vital Proteins brand both on and off the field. This spring/summer, fans and players can also look forward to the launch of a pro series line of performance-inspired collagen products. For more information on our collagen, recipes, and benefits, visit www.vitalproteins.com/blog, follow @vitalproteins on Instagram, or follow the hashtag #StayVital. About Vital Proteins® Founded on the belief that whole-food-based nutrition containing collagen is essential for one's overall health, fitness, and wellbeing, Vital Proteins® is dedicated to providing 100% natural, whole food proteins using sustainable, clean practices. The company produces a variety of collagen offerings made from pasture-raised, grass-fed cows, and wild caught, Non-GMO Project Verified marine collagen. For more information, please visit www.vitalproteins.com. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/vital-proteins-becomes-official-collagen-partner-of-chicago-cubs-300444464.html


News Article | May 11, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.com

As previously announced NutriData of California will develop the high energy supplement specific for gamers within the esports sector. They will also handle FDA Compliance for the finished product labeling. The staff of NutriData in conjunction with Natural products will develop the formula that will be original and exclusive to eGamerz. The supplement will be specifically formulated for increasing focus, energy, faster reaction time, clearer thinking, endurance and will be sugar free with minimal calories. The product will be available to the consumer later this month. The initial products will include multiple flavors of a powder supplement drink mix and a high energy supplement bar. The company will add additional product line within the next couple of months. The eSports sector will break a billion dollars in revenue for 2017 on a global basis per Business Insider and expected to reach 1.5 Billion dollars by 2020. The supplement market is expected to reach 68 billion dollars by 2024. According to ESPN there are 55 million active users with 100 million unique viewers per month. The company has elected to develop a line of supplements for this sector as a natural fit alongside its recently acquired digital network. Established in 1993, NutriData was formed for the growing need for professional, cost effective nutrition analysis and labeling services. Under the direction of Carol Pirrone, Registered Dietitian, M.S., and member of the American Dietetic Association, NutriData pioneered the industry with professional analysis and nutrition labeling. Headquartered in Hoboken, NJ, LTS Nutraceuticals Inc. is a health & wellness holding company engaged in acquiring existing companies within the sector of nutraceutical and organic products. We also develop our own branded products, develop brand identity; assist in arranging for contract manufacturing, fulfillment and marketing. This press release does not constitute an offer of any securities for sale. This press release contains certain forward-looking statements within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933 and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934. These forward-looking statements involve certain risks and uncertainties that could cause actual results to differ. All forward-looking statements in this press release are based on information available to the company as of the date hereof, and the company undertakes no obligation to update forward-looking statements to reflect events or circumstances occurring after the date of this press release.


Amy Sullivan of dailyRD Earns Advanced Certification from The International Association of Eating Disorders Professionals Foundation Founder and CEO of dailyRD, Amy Sullivan joins an elite group of professionals committed to excellence in the treatment of eating disorders. Kansas City, MO, February 21, 2017 --( “Certification as an iaedp eating disorder specialist is evidence that both Sullivan and iaedp are diligent in seeking advancement in training, education, research and competency to address the complexities involved in the treatment of eating disorders,” says Tammy Beasley, RDN, CEDRD, CSSD, Director of iaedp Certification Committee. Sullivan currently serves as CEO of dailyRD ( Established in 1985, iaedp (http://www.iaedp.com) provides educational programs and training standards for eating disorder specialists and other medical professionals caring for those suffering from the full spectrum of disordered eating. The group offers the most widely respected certification process for specializing in eating disorder treatment. Kansas City, MO, February 21, 2017 --( PR.com )-- Amy Sullivan recently earned the Certified Eating Disorder Registered Dietitian (CEDRD) designation from the International Association of Eating Disorders Professionals (iaedp) Foundation, after completing a rigorous set of criteria for the evaluation of education, training, knowledge and experience.“Certification as an iaedp eating disorder specialist is evidence that both Sullivan and iaedp are diligent in seeking advancement in training, education, research and competency to address the complexities involved in the treatment of eating disorders,” says Tammy Beasley, RDN, CEDRD, CSSD, Director of iaedp Certification Committee.Sullivan currently serves as CEO of dailyRD ( http://www.dailyRD.com ). “This certification provides clients the assurance and confidence that the highest standards of care will be provided. It is an honor and a privilege to hold the CEDRD credential,” said Sullivan.Established in 1985, iaedp (http://www.iaedp.com) provides educational programs and training standards for eating disorder specialists and other medical professionals caring for those suffering from the full spectrum of disordered eating. The group offers the most widely respected certification process for specializing in eating disorder treatment.


News Article | February 27, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Vegesentials, the multiple international award-winning high-pressure pasteurized cold-pressed fruit and vegetable drink brand is now available on Amazon.com. In 2016, the London-based Vegesentials Ltd. partnered with Michigan-based Vegesentials USA, LLC to manufacture and distribute the Vegesentials line of juices throughout North America. Registered Dietitian Nutritionist (“RDN”) Nanette Cameron has been working with Vegesentials to improve their cold-pressed juices for children and young adults. Commenting on the ingredients of Vegesentials offerings, Cameron notes the added fiber “promotes blood sugar stabilization, but what it means is energy balance to improve a child’s focus and mood; something that is so important for learning and academics.” She continues that “digestive health refers to keeping healthy floral in the stomach, this decreases stomach pain, constipation, diarrhea, another common issue among children and many young adults.” Studying the various Vegesentials recipes and contents, Cameron commented, “What I like about these juices is the cold pressurized process. The nutrients from the fruit and vegetables are maintained; this is something that is not listed on a nutritional label. Consuming anti-oxidants and phyto-chemicals have been linked to a healthy immune system and prevention of disease.” The Vegesentials labels are “clean, and that’s what we advise our constituents to be on the look-out for: ‘clean labeling.’” As part of the required North American validation of the juice contents, Vegesentials retained the Department of Food Science at the University of Guelph (Ontario, CA) to certify its HPP process and juice ingredients. According to Dr. Keith Warriner, the aim of the validations is “to determine the efficacy of different HHP treatments to reduce model pathogens introduced into high acid juices.” Because HPP technology is relatively new and fresh juice has become so popular, Dr. Warriner will continue his academic research with Vegesentials to improve food safety for consumers. “The results [of our testing] indicate that juice formulation has a role in defining the pressure resistance of pathogens although which constituents provide protection to HHP remain unclear.” "Our biggest concern as a company is customer health," said Daniel Hoops, Vegesentials USA co-founder. "When you look at the vast array of cold-pressed juices sold on the Internet, few use the HPP technology. In addition to our juices having longer shelf life, we know that there is little to no risk of salmonella, ecoli, and other food-borne bacteria because we use HPP." Vegesentials is the United Kingdom’s first cold pressed vegetable and fruit drink brand. Following its launch in June 2012, Vegesentials can now be found in all but one WholeFoods in the U.K., 60% of the Waitrose supermarkets, and 50% of the Holland and Barrett outlets. Vegesentials has received numerous awards and recognition since its initial launch, including 2 Gold Stars awards for Superior Taste from the International Taste & Quality Institute, Winner of ‘the Health & Fitness Food and Drink ‘Smoothie Category 2014 Award’ by Women’s Fitness and Health & Fitness Magazines, Gold in the low calorie food and drink category by Women’s Fitness and Health & Fitness 2016, Voted as No.1 ‘Highly Recommended’ Drink at Be:Fit London Show 2014 by ‘Science of Fit’, Winner of 'Best Exhibitor Award 2014’ at The Food & Drink Expo Trade Show NEC Birmingham, UK’s largest ‘Food & Drink’ trade show in 2014, and Finalist for Grocer Gold Award for “Entrepreneur of 2014.” “We thought the American consumer might be a little hesitant to try a ‘foreign’ fruit and vegetable juice, but all of the feedback from our testing groups have come back with high marks. It’s been incredible and we’re honored to be the exclusive distributor here in North America.” Cameron said “I was genuinely shocked to hear my 16-year old nephew (who despises carrots) tell me that the Cheeky Carrot juice was ‘the best juice I have ever tasted!’ That was all the validation I needed.” Vegesentials USA will offer Amazon.com customers the Vegesentials 8.8oz Cheeky Carrot (carrot, apple, orange, lime, and chicory root), Cool Cucumber (cucumber, apple, spinach and chicory root), and Groovy Beet (beetroot, apple, cucumber, strawberry and chicory root). The child and senior version of these juices, sold in a 4.4oz bottle, will be available on Amazon.com at a later date. For more information about Vegesentials, visit http://www.vegesentials.co.uk or http://www.vegesentialsusa.com.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Center For Discovery is excited to announce that Aaron Flores, Registered Dietitian Nutritionist, is leading the dietary team at their newest outpatient eating disorder program in Woodland Hills. Aaron is passionate about supporting individuals learning how to make peace with food and develop body-positive behaviors and specializes in Intuitive Eating and Health at Every Size®. Prior to joining the Discovery team, Aaron spent a large part of his career developing and launching one of the first Binge Eating Disorder programs at the VA Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System. Additionally, Aaron has experience treating eating disorders at the residential and outpatient levels of care. “I am honored to be joining the Center For Discovery team. It is exciting to be a part of a culture of clinicians and staff that have the deepest understanding and respect for individuals suffering from eating disorders. Central to all of my work as a registered dietitian nutritionist is the understanding that healing the individual’s relationship with food and their body is not a simple journey and one that requires a complex set of skills to help aide in long-term recovery. Each individual comes to treatment with different specific needs and each client has different needs to help them along this journey. Center For Discovery understands this aspect 100% and I’m looking forward to helping clients find healing in their life,” said Flores. “We are excited and grateful for Aaron’s contribution to the new Woodland Hills program as well as to the 2017 launch of our outpatient specific Binge Eating Disorder track” said Dawn Delgado, National Director of Outpatient Services at Center for Discovery. According to the National Eating Disorders Association, eating disorders have the highest mortality rate of all mental illnesses. Center For Discovery is proud to offer specialized eating disorder treatment available to families, professionals and insurance organizations across the country. Center For Discovery is a national leader in eating disorder treatment and operates more eating disorder programs across the United States than any behavioral health provider. All of Center For Discovery’s programs are accredited by the Joint Commission and include intensive outpatient, partial hospitalization, and residential treatment facilities. For two decades, Center For Discovery has provided clinically sophisticated eating disorder, mental health, and substance abuse treatment to help clients and their families heal from the often devastating effects of these illnesses. For more information, visit http://www.CenterForDiscovery.com.

Loading Registered Dietitian collaborators
Loading Registered Dietitian collaborators