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Southport, United Kingdom

Vaidyanathan S.,Regional Spinal Injuries Center | Hughes P.L.,District General Hospital | Soni B.M.,Regional Spinal Injuries Center | Singh G.,District General Hospital
TheScientificWorldJournal | Year: 2010

A male patient with spina bifida and paraplegia, born in 1968, underwent urostomy in 1973. In 1999, he developed urine infections. Intravenous urography showed bilateral hydronephrosis and hydroureter. This patient continued to get recurrent urine infections. In 2009, computed tomography of the abdomen revealed dilatation of the ureters, but the ureters reverted to normal calibre as they passed forward through the anterior abdominal wall. The vas deferens on either side was crossing and kinking the ureter. Magnetic resonance imaging of the abdomen confirmed that the level of obstruction in both ureters was at the site where the vas deferens crossed the ureter and kinked it. While performing urostomy, the ureters below the crossover by the vas deferens were detached from the bladder and attached to the skin for urinary diversion, thus causing the vas deferens to hook the lower end of the ureters. As the patient gained height and weight, thereby increasing abdominal girth, kinking of the ureters by the vas deferens was accentuated. In hindsight, bilateral midline cutaneous urostomy using the ureters below the crossover by the vas deferens represents a poor surgical technique for urinary diversion. ©2010 with author. Published by TheScientificWorld. Source


Vaidyanathan S.,Regional Spinal Injuries Center | Soni B.M.,Regional Spinal Injuries Center | Hughes P.L.,District General Hospital | Singh G.,District General Hospital | Oo T.,Regional Spinal Injuries Center
Advances in Urology | Year: 2010

Never Events are serious, largely preventable patient safety incidents that should not occur if the available preventative measures have been implemented. We propose that a list of Never Events is created for spinal cord injury patients in order to improve the quality of care. To begin with, following two preventable complications related to management of neuropathic bladder may be included in this list of Never Events. (i) Severe ventral erosion of glans penis and penile shaft caused by indwelling urethral catheter; (ii) incorrect placement of a Foley catheter leading to inflation of Foley balloon in urethra. If a Never Event occurs, health professionals should report the incident through hospital risk management system to National Patient Safety Agency's Reporting and Learning System, communicate with the patient, family, and their carer as soon as possible about the incident, undertake a comprehensive root cause analysis of what went wrong, how, and why, and implement the changes that have been identified and agreed following the root cause analysis. Copyright © 2010 Subramanian Vaidyanathan et al. Source


Vaidyanathan S.,Regional Spinal Injuries Center | Soni B.M.,Regional Spinal Injuries Center | Singh G.,District General Hospital | Oo T.,Regional Spinal Injuries Center | Hughes P.L.,District General Hospital
TheScientificWorldJournal | Year: 2011

Intermittent catheterisation is the preferred method of managing the neurogenic bladder in patients with spinal cord injury. However, spinal cord physicians experienced problems when trying to implement an intermittent catheterisation regime in some spinal cord injury patients in the northwest of England. We present illustrative cases to describe practical difficulties encountered by patients while trying to adopt an intermittent catheterisation regime. Barriers to intermittent catheterisation are (1) caregivers or nurses are not available to carry out five or six catheterisations a day; (2) lack of time to perform intermittent catheterisations; (3) unavailability of suitable toilet facilities in public places, including restaurants and offices; (4) redundant prepuce in a male patient, which prevents ready access to urethral meatus; (5) urethral false passage; (6) urethral sphincter spasm requiring the use of flexible-tip catheters and α-adrenoceptor-blocking drugs; (7) reluctance to perform intermittent catheterisation in patients >60 years by some health professionals; and (8) difficulty in accessing the urethral meatus for catheterisation while the patient is sitting up, especially in female patients. These cases demonstrate the urgent need for provision of trained caregivers who can perform intermittent catheterisation, and improvement in public facilities that are suitable for performing catheterisation in spinal cord injury patients. Further, vigilance should be exercised during each catheterisation in order to prevent complications, such as urethral trauma and consequent false passages. Health professionals should make additional efforts to implement intermittent catheterisation in female spinal cord injury patients and in those >60 years. ©2011 with author. Published by TheScientificWorld. Source


Vaidyanathan S.,Regional Spinal Injuries Center | Soni B.M.,Regional Spinal Injuries Center | Singh G.,District General Hospital | Hughes P.L.,District General Hospital | And 2 more authors.
TheScientificWorldJournal | Year: 2011

Autonomic dysreflexia is a clinical emergency that occurs in individuals with spinal cord injury at level T-6 and above. We present a 58-year-old male patient with paraplegia who developed a severe, recurrent, throbbing headache during the night, which was relieved by emptying the urinary bladder by intermittent catheterisation. As this person continued to get episodes of severe headache for more than 6 months, computed tomography (CT) of the brain was performed. CT revealed an infarct measuring 1.2 cm in the right basal ganglia. In order to control involuntary detrusor contractions, the patient was prescribed propiverine hydrochloride 15 mg four times a day. The alpha-adrenoceptor blocking drug doxazosin was used to reduce the severity of autonomic dysreflexia. Following 4 weeks of treatment with propiverine and doxazosin, the headache subsided completely. We learned from this case that bladder spasms in individuals with spinal cord injury can lead to severe, recurrent episodes of autonomic dysreflexia that, in turn, can predispose to vascular complications in the brain. Therefore, it is important to take appropriate steps to control bladder spasms and thereby prevent recurrent episodes of autonomic dysreflexia. Intermittent catheterisations along with an alpha-adrenoceptor blocking drug (doxazosin) and an antimuscarinic drug (propiverine hydrochloride) helped this individual to control autonomic dysreflexia, triggered by bladder spasms during the night. ©2011 with author. Published by TheScientificWorld. Source

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