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Euser S.M.,Regional Public Health Laboratory Kennemerland
Global health action | Year: 2012

To describe the effects of a broad empowerment programme among female sex workers (FSWs) in Bangalore, India, which seeks to develop the capacities of these women to address the issues that threaten their lives and livelihoods. This study is based on a comprehensive, on-going HIV-prevention and empowering programme, known as Pragati, which reaches out to approximately 10,000-12,000 FSWs in Bangalore each year. The programme has been designed in collaboration with the sex worker community and provides a personalised set of services, which include STI prevention and treatment services, crisis-response facilities, de-addiction services, and microfinance support all of which have been tailored to adequately fulfil each woman's needs. During the period examined by this study, the programme reached out to 20,330 individual FSWs [median (IQR) age 28 (24-35) years]. The programme's personal records of the participating FSWs were used for this descriptive study. Between 2005 and 2010, the number of participating FSWs increased from 2,307 to 13,392. These women intensified their contact with the programme over time: the number of programme contacts increased from 10,351 in 2005 to 167,709 in 2010. Furthermore, data on the effects of crisis-response facilities, de-addiction and microfinance services, condom distribution schemes, and STI diagnosis and treatment showed an accumulating involvement of the participating FSWs in these programme services. This programme, which focuses on social and economic empowerment among FSWs, is successful in reaching and involving the target population. Source


Euser S.M.,Regional Public Health Laboratory Kennemerland
Euro surveillance : bulletin européen sur les maladies transmissibles = European communicable disease bulletin | Year: 2012

Visiting wellness centres is considered safe and relaxing and might provide health benefits for visitors with certain cardiovascular, dermatological or respiratory diseases. On the other hand, wellness centres could pose health risks, especially with respect to Legionnaires' disease. We investigated the role of wellness centres in the occurrence of Legionnaires' disease by analysing the data of eight years (2002-2010) of source investigation in the Netherlands. There were 15 wellness centres identified as potential sources of infection for a total of 35 Legionnaires' disease patients. Twelve of these centres were positive for Legionella spp.: six for Legionella pneumophila, six for non-pneumophila Legionella spp.. Of the 65 positive environmental samples found during the wellness centre investigations, 41 were derived from shower heads. For two centres, the Legionella pneumophila strains in the collected samples had a genotype that was indistinguishable from the patient isolates. These results show that wellness centres are potential sources of Legionnaires' disease. Source


Euser S.M.,Regional Public Health Laboratory Kennemerland | Bruin J.P.,Regional Public Health Laboratory Kennemerland | van der Hoek W.,National Institute for Public Health and the Environment | Schop W.A.,Municipal Public Health Service Rotterdam Rijnmond | den Boer J.W.,Regional Public Health Laboratory Kennemerland
Eurosurveillance | Year: 2012

Visiting wellness centres is considered safe and relaxing and might provide health benefits for visitors with certain cardiovascular, dermatological or respiratory diseases. On the other hand, wellness centres could pose health risks, especially with respect to Legionnaires' disease. We investigated the role of wellness centres in the occurrence of Legionnaires' disease by analysing the data of eight years (2002-2010) of source investigation in the Netherlands. There were 15 wellness centres identified as potential sources of infection for a total of 35 Legionnaires' disease patients. Twelve of these centres were positive for Legionella spp.: six for Legionella pneumophila, six for non-pneumophila Legionella spp. Of the 65 positive environmental samples found during the wellness centre investigations, 41 were derived from shower heads. For two centres, the Legionella pneumophila strains in the collected samples had a genotype that was indistinguishable from the patient isolates. These results show that wellness centres are potential sources of Legionnaires' disease. Source


Casati S.,Cantonal Institute of Microbiology | Conza L.,Cantonal Institute of Microbiology | Bruin J.,Regional Public Health Laboratory Kennemerland | Gaia V.,Cantonal Institute of Microbiology
Clinical Microbiology and Infection | Year: 2010

Data on the presence of Legionellae outside the aquatic environment are scarce. Alternative ecosystems that could act as a reservoir for Legionella spp. have been investigated to identify unconventional contaminated substrates that are able to produce bioaerosols. We considered eight green waste collection sites including three composting facilities. Legionella pneumophila sg 1-15, Legionella bozemanii, Legionella cincinnatiensis, Legionella jamestowniensis, Legionella micdadei and L. oakridgensis were isolated from samples taken at six of the eight sites. The degree of contamination ranged from 103 to 108 CFU/g. Compost facilities appear to comprise an important reservoir for Legionellae. © 2009 The Authors. Journal Compilation © 2009 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Source


Schalk J.A.C.,National Institute for Public Health and the Environment | van Leeuwen A.E.D.,National Institute for Public Health and the Environment | Lodder W.J.,National Institute for Public Health and the Environment | de Man H.,Institute for Risk Assessment science | And 3 more authors.
Applied and Environmental Microbiology | Year: 2012

Viable Legionella pneumophila bacteria were isolated by amoebal coculture from pluvial floods after intense rainfall and from water collected at sewage treatment plants. Several isolated L. pneumophila strains belonged to sequence types that have been previously identified in patients. © 2012, American Society for Microbiology. Source

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