Time filter

Source Type

PubMed | The Veterinary Tactical Group, The Veterinary Specialty Hospital of the Carolinas, BluePearl Veterinary Partners, The K9 Tactical Emergency Casualty Care Working Group and 6 more.
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Journal of veterinary emergency and critical care (San Antonio, Tex. : 2001) | Year: 2016

To examine available evidence on prehospital care in human and veterinary trauma and emergency medicine and develop best practice guidelines for use by both paramedical and nonparamedical personnel in the approach to the prehospital care of dogs and cats.Systematic evaluation of the literature gathered via medical databases searches of Medline, CAB abstracts, and Google Scholar.From a review and systematic evaluation of the available evidence, consensus guidelines on the approach to prehospital care of dogs and cats in 18 scenarios were developed.Due to the lack of current evidence in the veterinary prehospital arena, best practice guidelines were developed as an initial platform. Recommendations were based on a review of pertinent human and available veterinary literature as well as a consensus of the authors professional opinions. It is anticipated that evidence-based additions will be made in the future.


James T.,Regional Institute for Veterinary Emergencies and Referrals | Lane M.,Regional Institute for Veterinary Emergencies and Referrals | Crowe D.,Regional Institute for Veterinary Emergencies and Referrals | Pullen W.,Regional Institute for Veterinary Emergencies and Referrals
Veterinary Journal | Year: 2015

Endotracheal intubation is the standard of care to establish a secure airway; however, laryngeal airway management systems are increasingly being used in human patients for elective surgical procedures and in emergency settings. In this study, a double lumen, blind insertion airway device (BIAD) was placed in the esophagus of dogs and evaluated for its ability to ventilate the lungs. Initially, 10 euthanazed dogs were evaluated, followed by a group of 15 mixed breed dogs that were undergoing elective spay or neuter procedures, and a group of 10 healthy dogs. Post-procedure evaluation included visual examination with a laryngoscope to inspect for signs of inflammation or mucosal damage. The device provided adequate ventilation in all subjects; the dogs were under anesthesia or heavily sedated for 10 min to 2 h and recovered uneventfully. No evidence of esophagitis, aspiration pneumonia, tracheitis, subcutaneous emphysema or esophageal laceration was observed. In conclusion, the use of double lumen airway devices warrants further study as an alternative airway management system in dogs. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.

Loading Regional Institute for Veterinary Emergencies and Referrals collaborators
Loading Regional Institute for Veterinary Emergencies and Referrals collaborators