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Byren I.,Nuffield Orthopaedic Center | Rege S.,Cubist Pharmaceuticals Inc. | Campanaro E.,Cubist Pharmaceuticals Inc. | Yankelev S.,Cubist Pharmaceuticals Inc. | And 3 more authors.
Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy | Year: 2012

The prevalence of Staphylococcus aureus causing prosthetic joint infection (PJI) supports investigation of higher doses of dapto-mycin in the management of PJI. This was a prospective, randomized controlled trial studying safety and efficacy of daptomycin (6 and 8 mg/kg of body weight) compared with standard-of-care therapy for PJI. This open-label study randomized 75 patients undergoing 2-stage revision arthroplasty to daptomycin at 6 or 8 mg/kg or a comparator (vancomycin, teicoplanin, or semisyn-thetic penicillin). After prosthesis removal, patients received 6 weeks of antibiotic treatment and a 2- to 6-week antibiotic-free period before implantation of a new prosthesis. Test of cure (TOC) was within 1 to 2 weeks after reimplantation. The primary objective was evaluation of creatine phosphokinase (CPK) levels. Secondary objectives were clinical efficacy and microbiological assessments. Of 73 CPK safety population patients, CPK elevation of >500 U/liter occurred in 4 of 25 (16.0%) (daptomycin, 6 mg/kg) and 5 of 23 (21.7%) (daptomycin, 8 mg/kg) daptomycin-treated patients and 2 of 25 (8.0%) comparator patients. Adverse-event rates were similar among daptomycin and comparator groups. Among modified intent-to-treat patients at TOC, clinical success rates were 14 of 24 (58.3%) for 6 mg/kg daptomycin, 14 of 23 (60.9%) for 8 mg/kg daptomycin, and 8 of 21 (38.1%) for the comparator. Overall microbiological success at TOC was 12 of 24 (50.0%) for 6 mg/kg daptomycin, 12 of 23 (52.2%) for 8 mg/kg daptomycin, and 8 of 21 (38.1%) for comparator patients. In conclusion, daptomycin at 6 and 8 mg/kg given for up to 6 weeks was safe and appeared to be effective in managing staphylococcal PJI using a 2-stage revision arthroplasty technique in a total of 49 patients. Copyright © 2012, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.


Gambacorti-Passerini C.,University of Milan Bicocca | Cortes J.E.,University of Houston | Lipton J.H.,Princess Margaret Hospital | Dmoszynska A.,Medical University of Lublin | And 9 more authors.
American Journal of Hematology | Year: 2014

Bosutinib, an orally active, Src/Abl tyrosine kinase inhibitor, has demonstrated clinical activity and acceptable tolerability in chronic phase chronic myeloid leukemia (CP CML). This updated analysis of the BELA trial assessed the safety profile and management of toxicities of bosutinib versus imatinib in adults with newly diagnosed (≤6 months) CP CML after >30 months from accrual completion. Among patients randomized to bosutinib 500 mg/d (n=250) or imatinib 400 mg/d (n=252), 248 and 251, respectively, received ≥1 dose of study treatment. Adverse events (AEs; any grade) with bosutinib versus imatinib were significantly more common for certain gastrointestinal events (diarrhea, 70% vs. 26%; P<0.001; vomiting, 33% vs. 16%; P<0.001), alanine aminotransferase (33% vs. 9%; P<0.001) and aspartate aminotransferase (28% vs. 10%; P<0.001) elevations, and pyrexia (19% vs. 12%; P=0.046). AEs significantly less common with bosutinib included edema (periorbital, 2% vs. 14%; P<0.001; peripheral, 5% vs. 12%; P=0.006), musculoskeletal (myalgia, 5% vs. 12%; P=0.010; muscle cramps, 5% vs. 22%; P<0.001; bone pain, 4% vs. 11%; P=0.003), increased creatine phosphokinase (8% vs. 20%; P<0.001), neutropenia (13% vs. 30%; P<0.001), and leukopenia (9% vs. 22%; P<0.001). Between-group differences in the incidence of cardiac and vascular AEs were not significant. Diarrhea was typically transient, mostly Grade 1/2, occurring early during treatment, and was manageable with antidiarrheal medication. Despite higher rates of aminotransferase elevation with bosutinib, events were managed in most patients with dose modification and/or concomitant medication. Bosutinib had a manageable safety profile distinct from that of imatinib in patients with newly diagnosed CP CML. © 2014 The Authors. American Journal of Hematology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.


Brunner H.I.,University of Cincinnati | Ruperto N.,Coordinating Center | Zuber Z.,St. Louis Childrens Hospital | Keane C.,Roche Holding AG | And 27 more authors.
Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases | Year: 2015

Objective To evaluate the interleukin-6 receptor inhibitor tocilizumab for the treatment of patients with polyarticular-course juvenile idiopathic arthritis ( pcJIA). Methods This three-part, randomised, placebocontrolled, double-blind withdrawal study (NCT00988221) included patients who had active pcJIA for ≥6 months and inadequate responses to methotrexate. During part 1, patients received open-label tocilizumab every 4 weeks (8 or 10 mg/kg for body weight (BW) <30 kg; 8 mg/kg for BW ≥30 kg). At week 16, patients with ≥JIA-American College of Rheumatology (ACR) 30 improvement entered the 24- week, double-blind part 2 after randomisation 1:1 to placebo or tocilizumab (stratified by methotrexate and steroid background therapy) for evaluation of the primary end point: JIA flare, compared with week 16. Patients flaring or completing part 2 received open-label tocilizumab. Results In part 1, 188 patients received tocilizumab (<30 kg: 10 mg/kg (n=35) or 8 mg/kg (n=34); ≥30 kg: n=119). In part 2, 163 patients received tocilizumab (n=82) or placebo (n=81). JIA flare occurred in 48.1% of patients on placebo versus 25.6% continuing tocilizumab (difference in means adjusted for stratification: -0.21; 95% CI -0.35 to -0.08; p=0.0024). At the end of part 2, 64.6% and 45.1% of patients receiving tocilizumab had JIA-ACR70 and JIAACR90 responses, respectively. Rates/100 patient-years (PY) of adverse events (AEs) and serious AEs (SAEs) were 480 and 12.5, respectively; infections were the most common SAE (4.9/100 PY). Conclusions Tocilizumab treatment results in significant improvement, maintained over time, of pcJIA signs and symptoms and has a safety profile consistent with that for adults with rheumatoid arthritis.


Brunner H.I.,University of Cincinnati | Ruperto N.,Coordinating Center | Zuber Z.,St. Louis Childrens Hospital | Keane C.,Roche Holding AG | And 27 more authors.
Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases | Year: 2014

Objective To evaluate the interleukin-6 receptor inhibitor tocilizumab for the treatment of patients with polyarticular-course juvenile idiopathic arthritis (pcJIA). Methods This three-part, randomised, placebo-controlled, double-blind withdrawal study (NCT00988221) included patients who had active pcJIA for =6 months and inadequate responses to methotrexate. During part 1, patients received open-label tocilizumab every 4 weeks (8 or 10 mg/kg for body weight (BW) <30 kg; 8 mg/kg for BW ≥30 kg). At week 16, patients with ≥JIA-American College of Rheumatology (ACR) 30 improvement entered the 24-week, double-blind part 2 after randomisation 1:1 to placebo or tocilizumab (stratified by methotrexate and steroid background therapy) for evaluation of the primary end point: JIA flare, compared with week 16. Patients flaring or completing part 2 received open-label tocilizumab. Results In part 1, 188 patients received tocilizumab (<30 kg: 10 mg/kg (n=35) or 8 mg/kg (n=34); ≥30 kg: n=119). In part 2, 163 patients received tocilizumab (n=82) or placebo (n=81). JIA flare occurred in 48.1% of patients on placebo versus 25.6% continuing tocilizumab (difference in means adjusted for stratification: -0.21; 95% CI -0.35 to -0.08; p=0.0024). At the end of part 2, 64.6% and 45.1% of patients receiving tocilizumab had JIA-ACR70 and JIA-ACR90 responses, respectively. Rates/100 patient-years (PY) of adverse events (AEs) and serious AEs (SAEs) were 480 and 12.5, respectively; infections were the most common SAE (4.9/100 PY). Conclusions Tocilizumab treatment results in significant improvement, maintained over time, of pcJIA signs and symptoms and has a safety profile consistent with that for adults with rheumatoid arthritis. © 2014 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd & European League Against Rheumatism.

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