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Portland, OR, United States
Portland, OR, United States

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Wightman C.S.,Montana State University | Saab V.A.,Rocky Research | Forristal C.,Montana State University | Mellen-Mclean K.,Region | Markus A.,Fremont Winema National Forests
Journal of Wildlife Management | Year: 2010

Within forests susceptible to wildfire and insect infestations, land managers need to balance dead tree removal and habitat requirements for wildlife species associated with snags. We used Mahalanobis distance methods to develop predictive models of white-headed woodpecker (Picoides albolarvatus) nesting habitat in postfire ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa)-dominated landscapes on the Fremont-Winema National Forests in south central Oregon, USA. The 1-km radius (314 ha) surrounding 45 nest sites was open-canopied before fire and a mosaic of burn severities after wildfire. The 1-ha surrounding nests of white-headed woodpeckers had fewer live trees per hectare and more decayed and larger diameter snags than at non-nest sites. The leading cause of nest failure seemed to be predation. Habitat and abiotic features were not associated with nest survival. High daily survival rates and little variation within habitat features among nest locations suggest white-headed woodpeckers were consistently selecting high suitability habitats. Management activities that open the forest canopy and create conditions conducive to a mosaic burn pattern will probably provide suitable white-headed woodpecker nesting habitat after wildfire. When making postfire salvage logging decisions, we suggest that retention of larger, more decayed snags will provide nesting habitat in recently burned forests. © 2010 The Wildlife Society.


Parisio S.J.,Region
Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences | Year: 2013

Major ion chemistry of Catskill region groundwater is characterized on the basis of 207 analyses compiled from three sources, including a web-based U.S. Geological Survey database, state agency regulatory compliance data, and sampling of trailside springs performed by the authors. All samples were analyzed for the complete set of major ions, including calcium, magnesium, sodium, potassium, bicarbonate, chloride, sulfate, and nitrate. Groundwater in pristine, high-elevation areas of the Catskill Peaks was found to be predominantly of calcium bicarbonate, calcium sulfate, or calcium bicarbonate-sulfate types, with relatively low ionic strength. Groundwater at lower elevations along the margins of the region or in valley bottoms was predominantly of sodium-chloride or sodium-bicarbonate types, showing the effects of road salt and other local pollution sources. Nitrate and sulfate enrichment attributable to regional air pollution sources were most evident in the high-elevation spring samples, owing to the generally low concentrations of other major ions. Trailside springs appear to be viable low-cost sources for obtaining samples representative of groundwater, especially in remote and inaccessible areas of the Catskill forest preserve. © 2013 New York Academy of Sciences.


PubMed | Region
Type: | Journal: Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences | Year: 2014

Major ion chemistry of Catskill region groundwater is characterized on the basis of 207 analyses compiled from three sources, including a web-based U.S. Geological Survey database, state agency regulatory compliance data, and sampling of trailside springs performed by the authors. All samples were analyzed for the complete set of major ions, including calcium, magnesium, sodium, potassium, bicarbonate, chloride, sulfate, and nitrate. Groundwater in pristine, high-elevation areas of the Catskill Peaks was found to be predominantly of calcium bicarbonate, calcium sulfate, or calcium bicarbonate-sulfate types, with relatively low ionic strength. Groundwater at lower elevations along the margins of the region or in valley bottoms was predominantly of sodium-chloride or sodium-bicarbonate types, showing the effects of road salt and other local pollution sources. Nitrate and sulfate enrichment attributable to regional air pollution sources were most evident in the high-elevation spring samples, owing to the generally low concentrations of other major ions. Trailside springs appear to be viable low-cost sources for obtaining samples representative of groundwater, especially in remote and inaccessible areas of the Catskill forest preserve.

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