Regenstrief Institute

Indianapolis, United States

Regenstrief Institute

Indianapolis, United States
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INDIANAPOLIS -- More than 13 million older adults are admitted to hospitals annually in the United States. Nearly a quarter need to have all decisions made for them by a family member, and almost half need help from family to make some decisions. Clinician-researchers from the Indiana University Center for Aging Research and the Regenstrief Institute have developed a tool to measure the communication experiences of family members of hospitalized patients. "Good, timely communication with family members is essential for good decision-making, and difficulty in communication adds stress to an already stressful situation," said IU Center for Aging Research and Regenstrief Institute scientist Alexia Torke, MD, an expert on surrogate decision-making, who led the development and validation of the new tool. "Our survey tool is unique in that it measures communication in all settings of the hospital and accounts for the fact that family members often encounter multiple clinicians during the patient's hospital stay." "Patients exist in the context of their family, yet in the hospital setting, surrogate decision-makers and other family members too often are disregarded. But they should be part of the health care team and process -- part of whole patient care. Medical teams and entire health care systems need to increasingly value communication with family members as they pursue quality of care goals." Dr. Torke also holds appointments with IU School of Medicine, the IU Health Charles Warren Fairbanks Center for Medical Ethics and the Daniel F. Evans Center for Spiritual and Religious Values in Healthcare. A new study published online ahead of print in the Journal of Pain and Symptom Management has validated and confirmed the reliability of the Family Inpatient Communication Survey. The easy to administer, practical IU Center for Aging Research tool comprises 30 questions that probe the communication experiences of family members of hospitalized patients. The survey focuses on two dimensions of communication by the medical staff--conveyance of information and emotional support. Dr. Torke and colleagues were aware from their previous work that family members desire frequent updates from the medical team. So the survey tool asks family members to indicate if they believed that hospital staff members communicated with them as often as they would have liked. The survey asks if family members had to struggle to acquire information from the staff. It also queries whether they felt they had received adequate emotional support from the hospital staff. In the validation and reliability study, conducted with 350 family members of IU Health Methodist Hospital, IU Health West Hospital and Eskenazi Health inpatients, the vast majority of family members reported good communication experiences. Approximately 83 percent indicated that hospital staff members adequately communicated with family members and 93 percent indicated that they felt that the hospital listed to them. Only six percent desired more emotional support than they received. "These positive responses indicate that most family members are very satisfied with communication, but the survey does allow us to identify individuals who have had a bad experience," said Dr. Torke. "In the future, the survey can help us target interventions to improve communication in the hospital." The survey, which for this study was conducted via phone interviews by research assistants, took about five minutes for each family member to complete. In addition to Dr. Torke, authors of "Validation of the Family Inpatient Communication Survey" are Patrick Monahan, PhD, of the IU School of Medicine; Christopher M. Callahan of the IU Center for Aging Research, Regenstrief Institute and IU School of Medicine; Paul R. Helft, MD, of IU Health and the IU Health Melvin and Bren Simon Cancer Center; Greg A. Sachs, IU Center for Aging Research, Regenstrief Institute and IU School of Medicine; Lucia D. Wocial, PhD, RN, of IU Health; James E. Slaven, MS, of IU School of Medicine; Kianna Montz, MA, Lev Inger, BS and Emily Burke, BS, of the IU Center for Aging Research and Regenstrief Institute. The development of the study was funded by the Research in Palliative and End-of-Life Communication and Training (RESPECT) Center of Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis and the National Institute on Aging (R01 AG044408). The survey is downloadable from the IU Center for Aging Research website, which also contains licensing information.


News Article | November 1, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

INDIANAPOLIS -- The goal of advance care planning is to ensure that the health care an individual receives is consistent with his or her values and preferences. New research shows the critical need for advance care planning and highlights the challenges that healthcare institutions -- especially nursing homes -- face in supporting high quality advance care planning. The analysis of advance care planning in nursing homes was conducted as part of the OPTIMISTIC project, an initiative developed and implemented at a growing number of nursing homes by a team of clinician-researchers from Indiana University Schools of Nursing and Medicine and the Regenstrief Institute. The aim of OPTIMISTIC -- an acronym for Optimizing Patient Transfers, Impacting Medical quality and Improving Symptoms: Transforming Institutional Care -- is to improve care and communication within nursing facilities and between these facilities and acute-care institutions. The goal is to catch and solve problems early, improving quality of care and reducing unnecessary hospital transfers. "An Interim Analysis of an Advance Care Planning Intervention in the Nursing Home Setting" is available online ahead of print publication in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society. The goal of the study was to describe the implementation of advance care planning in nursing homes. The study emphasizes the importance of resident preferences when trying to reduce avoidable hospitalizations of nursing home residents. The researchers reported on the formal advance care planning conversations facilitated by specially trained nurses with residents and family members in the 19 nursing homes participating in the initial phase of OPTIMISTIC. These conversations resulted in changes in care plans about two-thirds of the time. When asked, many nursing home residents (or family members of those unable to make decisions for themselves) preferred less aggressive treatment than the default of providing all available treatments to the often frail and chronically ill residents. Significantly, almost half of those residents or family members who participated in advance care planning as a part of the OPTIMISTIC study elected only comfort care rather than potentially life extending measures like going to the intensive care unit. Only six percent of nursing home residents who were asked to participate in an advance care conversation declined to do so. "Implementation of advance care planning in the nursing home setting has not been well studied," said JAGS study first author Susan Hickman, PhD, professor at IU School of Nursing and an IU Center for Aging Research affiliated scientist. "Supporting high quality advance care planning takes significant time and resources such as staff training, policy changes, and education. Encouragingly, we found that most residents and family members want to talk about treatment preferences and that these conversations often result in changes in our understanding of resident's goals." Dr. Hickman is a geriatric psychologist. During the study the average length of advance care planning conversations was approximately 40 minutes. Many residents had more than one conversation on the topic. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends that advance care planning be part of the self-management approach to living with multiple chronic diseases, typical of many older adults. The Institute of Medicine has identified advance care planning as a key strategy to improving care of patients near the end of life. "Advance care planning and learning the goals of care from patients and families is the cornerstone for providing excellent palliative care to people with serious illnesses, including frail residents of nursing homes, many of whom have advanced dementia," said Greg Sachs, MD, senior author of the JAGS study. "If a patient and family want to aim at remaining comfortable in the nursing facility and forgoing a burdensome transfer and non-beneficial treatments in the hospital, we need to know that so that their care matches these goals. "This is why Medicare now pays physicians to hold advance care planning conversations, and why we are continuing to strengthen our advance care planning intervention in OPTIMISTIC and have added a palliative care nurse to support advance care planning implementation and symptom management to the program for phase II." Dr. Sachs is a Regenstrief Institute investigator, and professor of medicine and director of the Division of General Internal Medicine and Geriatrics at IU School of Medicine. He co-directed Phase I of OPTIMISTIC. In addition to Dr. Hickman and Dr. Sachs, co-authors of the JAGS study are Kathleen Unroe, MD, MHA of the IU Center for Aging Research, the Regenstrief Institute and IU School of Medicine; Bryce Buente, formerly of the IU Center for Aging Research and the Regenstrief Institute; Mary Ersek, PhD, of the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing and Arif Nazir, MD, formerly with IU School of Medicine and now with Signature HealthCARE. OPTIMISTIC is expected to receive more than $30 million of Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services funding through The Initiative to Reduce Avoidable Hospitalizations among Nursing Facility Residents. This includes $16.9 million awarded earlier this year for the second phase of OPTIMISTIC, led by Dr. Unroe.


News Article | November 3, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

INDIANAPOLIS -- The Aging Brain Care Medical Home, a novel brain-focused population health management program implemented in the homes of older adults, lowered depression severity by more than 50 percent over six months according to a new study from the Regenstrief Institute, Indiana University Center for Aging Research, IU Center for Health Innovation and Implementation Science, and Eskenazi Health. The ABC Medical Home program utilizes a trained and scalable workforce of care coordinator assistants with at least high school educations as the core of interdisciplinary care team of nurses, social workers, and physicians responsible for meeting the complex biopsychosocial brain-care needs of older adults. "Response to Depression Treatment in the Aging Brain Care Medical Home Model" is published online in Clinical Interventions in Aging, a peer-reviewed open access journal. The implementation study provides strong evidence of the sustained effectiveness of the ABC Medical Home program at inducing depression remission employing a workforce that develops long-term relationships with the patients through home visits and telephone contacts. The more than 50 percent decrease in depression symptoms occurred in individuals with high levels of these symptoms. While women experienced improvement sooner than men, there was no gender difference in symptom diminution at the end of six months. In older adults with low levels of depression, depression scores remained low over time indicating that the care model prevented depression symptoms from recurring. Michael LaMantia, M.D., MPH, first author of the new study, offers the following analogy to explain the different responses of older adults with high levels of depressive symptoms and those with low levels. "If you have people who are driving a car at 60 miles per hour, these drivers have a lot of room to decelerate over time because they are going at a high speed; similarly there is significant room for symptom decease in those with high symptom levels; but for those with low depressive symptom levels, like those drivers traveling 5 or 10 miles per hour, there isn't a whole lot of decline possible. Keeping them from accelerating is the goal." "The heart of the ABC Medical Home model is collaborative care. We are working in conjunction with the primary care physicians to provide these patients the level of care that they need," said Dr. LaMantia, a former Regenstrief Institute and IU Center for Aging Research investigator who recently became Section Head of Geriatric Medicine and associate professor of medicine at the University of Vermont College of Medicine. Depressive symptoms included feeling hopeless, feeling bad about oneself, or having difficulty concentrating. Severity was measured in the 773 study participants utilizing the Patient Health Questionnaire 9. The PHQ-9 was co-developed in 1999 by Regenstrief Institute research scientist and IU School of Medicine professor of medicine Kurt Kroenke, M.D., to screen primary care patients for depression. It is an easy to administer, validated means of quantifying the patient's symptoms that Dr. Kroenke has called "a blood pressure cuff for depression." The ABC Medical Home program is centered at Eskenazi Health, an academic, urban, public hospital, at 10 community health centers located in Indianapolis, and in the homes of patients who receive medical care at these facilities. "Previously, we were able to reduce depression severity using an expensive and unscalable work force of registered nurses, advanced nurse practitioners, or master degree social workers. This study accomplished similar outcomes with a much more scalable and cost effective work force," said Regenstrief Institute and IU Center for Aging Research investigator Malaz Boustani, MD, MPH, chief innovation and implementation officer of the IU Center for Health Innovation and Implementation Science, and founding director of the Sandra Eskenazi Center for Brain Care Innovation. "Such a cost-effective work force can facilitate the dissemination and implementation of the ABC Medical Home care by healthcare systems and physician practices nationwide to meet the needs of the nation's growing population of older adults." Co-authors of the new study in addition to Dr. LaMantia and Dr. Boustani are Debra Litzelman, MA, M.D., of the Regenstrief Institute and IU School of Medicine; Sujuan Gao, Ph.D., Mary Guerriero Austrom, Ph.D., and Ann Cottingham, M.A., M.A.R., of the IU School of Medicine; Anthony J. Perkins, M.S., of the IU Center for Health Innovation and Implementation Science and the Indiana Clinical and Translation Sciences Institute; Cathy Alder, J.D., MSW, of Eskenazi Health; and Dustin D. French, Ph.D., of Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University and Veterans Affairs Health Services Research and Development Service. This work was supported by grant 1C1CMS331000-01-00 from the Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services. The contents of the published study are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official views of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services or any of its agencies.


CAMBRIDGE, MA and INDIANAPOLIS, IN--(Marketwired - February 09, 2017) - Elsevier, a world-leading provider of scientific, technical and medical information products and services, and the IU Richard M. Fairbanks School of Public Health at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis today announced that HIMSS (Healthcare Information Management Systems Society), an international not-for-profit organization focused on better health through information technology (IT), will award its 2016 Book of the Year Award to Health Information Exchange: Navigating and Managing a Network of Health Information Systems. Edited by Brian E. Dixon, PhD, FHIMSS, an Associate Professor at the IU Richard M. Fairbanks School of Public Health and Research Scientist at the Regenstrief Institute, the book was published in March 2016 by Elsevier's Academic Press imprint. Health Information Exchange confronts the opportunities and challenges associated with the electronic exchange of data and information across the complex network of hospitals, clinics, pharmacies, and other entities involved in providing health care. While the last decade has witnessed tremendous growth in the proliferation of IT in health care, many find it complicated and frustrating to connect those systems in a way that delivers high quality, patient-centered care. Described as a "timely response to a critical need within the health system" by Charles E. Christian, FHIMSS, CHCIO, the Vice President for Technology and Engagement at the Indiana Health Information Exchange who nominated it for the award, the book chronicles the need for and progress towards interoperability among health information systems as well as the methods and tools necessary to enable seamless, nationwide exchange of health information no matter where a patient receives care. Experts and accomplished practitioners contributed to the book's chapters and its several case studies that detail how leading organizations are moving the needle with respect to health care delivery and outcomes. The HIMSS Book of the Year Award honors a book that offers outstanding practical guidance and/or strategic insight for healthcare information and management systems professionals. JoAnn W. Klinedinst, MEd, CPHIMS, PMP, DES, FHIMSS, the Vice President of Professional Development for HIMSS North America summarizes the merits of the book this way: "Not only does Dr. Dixon offer foundational knowledge on Health Information Exchange (HIE) that covers the broad areas of technology, governance, and policy but also he provides in-depth case studies that serve to connect learners to real-world applications. This combination is critical to ensuring that stakeholders across all disciplines understand the latest applications of HIE that positively impact care delivery." Editor Brian E. Dixon, PhD, FHIMSS, teaches and conducts research in the area of public health informatics, which applies information and computer science to improve population health monitoring as well as outcomes. Prior to joining the faculty at IUPUI, Dr. Dixon was an accomplished computer programmer as well as IT project manager who developed and implemented technologies that are now used by more than 100 hospitals and 20,000 physicians to exchange data necessary for caring for individual patients as well as monitoring the health of Indiana communities via the Indiana Health Information Exchange. Dr. Dixon has published more than 50 peer-reviewed publications and serves on multiple advisory boards for governmental and non-profit organizations who seek to use information technology to improve care delivery and health outcomes. Dr. Dixon was named to the "Forty Under 40" list in 2014 by the Indianapolis Business Journal and an Outstanding Investigator by the Regenstrief Institute's Center for Biomedical Informatics. He was named a HIMSS Fellow in 2012. The award will be presented to Dr. Dixon at the HIMSS Awards Gala, on February 21, 2017 at Loews Portofino Bay Hotel at Universal Orlando. The gala is one of the premier events held during the 2017 HIMSS Conference & Exhibition, from February 19-23, at the Orange County Convention Center. About the IU Richard M. Fairbanks School of Public Health The IU Richard M. Fairbanks School of Public Health at IUPUI seeks to cultivate innovative, interdisciplinary, community engaged education, research and service and prepare leaders in public health and health care. The school has over 500 students enrolled in its three undergraduate, four master's and four doctoral education programs related to public health and health administration. Pending approval, the school will offer the nation's first bachelor of science degree in health data science. The school further has numerous active research collaborations with local and state health departments in Indiana as well as the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), National Institutes of Health (NIH), Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF). About Elsevier Elsevier is a world-leading provider of information solutions that enhance the performance of science, health, and technology professionals, empowering them to make better decisions, deliver better care, and sometimes make groundbreaking discoveries that advance the boundaries of knowledge and human progress. Elsevier provides web-based, digital solutions -- among them ScienceDirect, Scopus, Research Intelligence and ClinicalKey -- and publishes over 2,500 journals, including The Lancet and Cell, and more than 35,000 book titles, including a number of iconic reference works. Elsevier is part of RELX Group, a world-leading provider of information and analytics for professional and business customers across industries. www.elsevier.com


News Article | November 23, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

INDIANAPOLIS -- Peter J. Embi, MD, MS, who joins the Regenstrief Institute as president and CEO on December 15, has been selected as the chair-elect of the board of directors of the American Medical Informatics Association, the largest international professional biomedical and health informatics association. The four-year term includes a one-year term as chair-elect, two years as the chair of the association's 21-person board of directors, and a final year as chair-emeritus. Dr. Embi is an internationally respected expert in biomedical informatics -- the application of computer and information sciences to health care and biomedical research. He has been a member of the American Medical Informatics Association since October 2000, and a board member since January 2015. In 2012 he was also inducted as a fellow of the American College of Medical Informatics, joining a select elected group of individuals who have made significant and sustained contributions to the field of biomedical informatics. "This is a critical time for health care in our country and for informatics in particular," Dr. Embi said. "As informaticians we are working to improve health care through the optimal use of information and information technology. "That couldn't be more important than it is today. We need to improve quality of care for individuals, accelerate biomedical discoveries, and keep our populations healthier. By leveraging health IT and health care data, we can better prevent, diagnose and treat disease -- with more precision and at lower cost to society - and learn from every patient to improve care well into the future. Informatics professionals are key to achieving this vision for a learning health care system." Dr. Embi notes that as a professional society, the American Medical Informatics Association is uniquely positioned to draw upon the expertise of its varied informatician membership -- physicians, nurses, pharmacists, computer scientists, technologists, physicists, biologists and others -- to determine how to optimize the use of health information technology and biomedical computing to improve health and the delivery of care. This fall he chaired the association's 2016 Annual Health Policy Invitational Meeting on health information policy. He anticipates that he, like past AMIA board chairs, will represent the association in many settings, including on Capitol Hill, and across a range of issues including electronic medical record systems, health information exchange, patient participation in their care, and accelerating biomedical research and innovation. Dr. Embi joins the Regenstrief Institute following six years at the Ohio State University, most recently as associate dean for research informatics at Ohio State's medical school. Regenstrief is recognized for pioneering work in the fields of medical informatics, aging, and health services research and for the practical application of this research to global needs -- present and future. The institute is composed of three research centers -- the William M. Tierney Center for Health Services Research, the Indiana University Center for Aging Research and the Clem McDonald Center for Biomedical Informatics. The institute's new Industry Research Office facilitates and supports industry-funded research partnerships leveraging Regenstrief's extensive resources. The institute's focal areas currently include applied health information technology, patient outcomes and safety, population and public health, precision medicine, global health informatics, brain health, health data standards, healthcare data analytics, patient outcomes, implementation science, drug safety, decision making, symptom management, nursing home care, physical fitness and health communication. Regenstrief's faculty and affiliated scientists include representatives of numerous disciplines including medical informatics, geriatrics, general internal medicine, pediatrics, family medicine, public health, emergency medicine, gastroenterology, psychiatry, neurology, sociology, global health, palliative care, communications and a variety of engineering disciplines including software and human factors engineering. In addition to his leadership position at the Regenstrief Institute, commencing next month Dr. Embi will serve as Sam Regenstrief Professor of Informatics and Health Services and as associate dean for informatics and health services research at Indiana University School of Medicine, associate director for informatics at the Indiana Clinical and Translational Sciences Institute and vice president for learning health systems at Indiana University Health.


News Article | March 2, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

COLUMBUS, Ohio--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Leading software and services company Signet Accel announced today that Dr. Peter Embi has been appointed to its executive team as Chief Medical Officer (CMO). As one of the company’s co-founders and creators of its flagship product Avec®, a federated data integration platform, Dr. Embi will add his expertise to the executive team as a practicing physician, researcher and informaticist. His areas of focus include platform strategy, design and development, thought leadership and relationship-building with hospitals, research organizations and professional societies. “My career sits at the intersection of healthcare, informatics and biomedical research. It enables me to draw connections between the real-world issues we face in healthcare and improving health, and the technology solutions needed to address them,” Dr. Embi said. “As Chief Medical Officer, I will work across the organization to ensure our technologies address the driving issues and challenges of both researchers and physicians.” Dr. Embi approaches healthcare information technology through the lens of clinical data and research. A leader in medicine, academia and business, he is also president and CEO of the Regenstrief Institute, an independent healthcare research institute and support organization to the Indiana University School of Medicine. The CMO position will be a dual role for Dr. Embi. “Dr. Embi identifies as a physician first, and his patient-centered approach to informatics, research and HIT is in perfect alignment with our mission,” said John Raden, Signet Accel CEO. “He provides insight into the needs of physicians and researchers working on the frontlines of medicine each day, while possessing the technical knowledge to help our team address those needs. Dr. Embi’s appointment to our executive team is another step forward in the advancement and expansion of our company.” Avec connects disparate databases across healthcare verticals, allowing researchers to identify patterns and trends over a large patient population and offering comprehensive insight into both research and patient treatment. Robust repositories of connected data are a key resource in realizing the promise of precision medicine, a research effort aimed at improving health and treating disease by accounting for patients’ individual differences. As a software and services company specializing in data integration, Signet Accel brings true interoperability to healthcare data and increases speed of discovery to translational medicine. Signet Accel’s Avec® platform is true interoperability realized in healthcare. As the sole alternative to traditional, centralized data management solutions, Avec® delivers the industry's only purpose-built commercial federated data integration platform, developed and refined over 12 years at The Ohio State University. Signet Accel’s software products and services power the work of consortia, institutions, and health professionals around the world with unmatched security, sharing capability and speed of discovery — advancing academic research, achieving meaningful use objectives, and enabling the continuum of care. Learn how to make your data meaningful and achieve true interoperability at SignetAccel.com.


News Article | February 21, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Among older adults with subthreshold depression (insufficient levels of depressive symptoms to meet diagnostic criteria), collaborative care compared with usual care resulted in an improvement in depressive symptoms after four months, although it is of uncertain clinical importance, according to a study appearing in the February 21 issue of JAMA. Depression is the second leading cause of disability worldwide, and one in seven older people meet criteria for depression. Effective therapeutic strategies are needed in older people with depressive symptoms. Simon Gilbody, Ph.D., of the University of York, England, and colleagues randomly assigned 705 adults age 65 years or older with subthreshold depression to collaborative care (n=344) or usual primary care (control; n=361). Collaborative care was coordinated by a case manager who assessed functional impairments relating to mood symptoms. Participants were offered behavioral activation and completed an average of six weekly sessions. Collaborative care resulted in lower scores vs usual care at 4-month follow-up on measures of self-reported depression severity. The proportion of participants meeting criteria for depression were lower for collaborative care (17.2 percent) than usual care (23.5 percent) at 4-month follow-up, and at 12-month follow-up (15.7 percent vs 27.8 percent). "Although differences persisted through 12 months, findings are limited by attrition, and further research is needed to assess longer-term efficacy," the authors write. Editor's Note: This project was funded by the UK National Institute of Health Research Health Technology Assessment Programme. All authors have completed and submitted the ICMJE Form for Disclosure of Potential Conflicts of Interest and none were reported. Related material: The editorial, "When and How to Treat Subthreshold Depression," by Kurt Kroenke, M.D., of the Regenstrief Institute, Indianapolis, also is available at the For The Media website. To place an electronic embedded link to this study in your story This link will be live at the embargo time: http://jamanetwork.


News Article | February 17, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.co.uk

Care Planning, a 2017 KLAS Category Leader Award winner, to be featured with Elsevier's other world-class clinical decision support solutions Elsevier, a world-leading provider of scientific, technical and medical information products and services, will showcase its Integrated Clinical Decision Support solutions at booth #2961 at the Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society (HIMSS) 2017 annual meeting in Orlando, Fla, Feb. 19-23. A leader in bringing evidence-based content into the care process, Elsevier focuses on encouraging quality, enhancing efficiency and improving outcomes - providing empowering knowledge that enables action at the point of care. Representatives from Elsevier's Clinical Solutions will be available to discuss how active clinical decision support solutions and integrated clinical content and information at the point of care can improve care delivery. "With the changing healthcare landscape, Elsevier is uniquely positioned to partner with healthcare providers to improve clinical outcomes," said Dr. John Danaher, President, Clinical Solutions at Elsevier. "Our solutions span the entire care continuum, across care settings and consider the patient at the center of care delivery. The recent recognition of Elsevier's Care Planning with the 2017 Best in KLAS award affirms our leadership in innovative, easy-to-use, high-quality evidence-based solutions integrated into healthcare systems and clinical workflows." "We are proud of our collaborations with our customers to advance the practice of interprofessional care teams and engagement of patients in support of exceptional patient care," Danaher said. Elsevier will also be highlighting new clinical pathway technology during the HIMSS interoperability showcase. This innovation will be demonstrated via a community care use case scenario. Elsevier is also celebrating the distinction of HIMSS 2016 Book of the Year Award to Health Information Exchange: Navigating and Managing a Network of Health Information Systems. Edited by Brian E. Dixon, PhD, FHIMSS, an Associate Professor at the IU Richard M. Fairbanks School of Public Health and Research Scientist at the Regenstrief Institute, the book was published in March 2016 by Elsevier's Academic Press. For more information on Elsevier HIMSS activities, visit Elsevier's Clinical Solutions HIMSS17 website. Elsevier is a world-leading provider of information solutions that enhance the performance of science, health, and technology professionals, empowering them to make better decisions, deliver better care, and sometimes make groundbreaking discoveries that advance the boundaries of knowledge and human progress. Elsevier provides web-based, digital solutions - among them ScienceDirect, Scopus, Research Intelligence and ClinicalKey - and publishes over 2,500 journals, including The Lancet and Cell, and more than 35,000 book titles, including a number of iconic reference works. Elsevier is part of RELX Group, a world-leading provider of information and analytics for professional and business customers across industries. www.elsevier.com


ORLANDO, Fla., Feb. 21, 2017 /PRNewswire/ -- From the floor of the HIMSS17 Conference & Exhibition in Orlando, Health Catalyst and the Regenstrief Institute announced today an agreement to bring Regenstrief's artificial intelligence-powered text analytics technology out of the lab and...

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