Regenerative Medicine and Cell Therapies Laboratory

Buenos Aires, Argentina

Regenerative Medicine and Cell Therapies Laboratory

Buenos Aires, Argentina

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PubMed | San Martin Hospital, Regenerative Medicine and Cell Therapies Laboratory, Burns Hospital and University of Puerto Rico at Mayaguez
Type: | Journal: Burns & trauma | Year: 2016

In January 2005, Rasulov et al. originally published First experience in the use of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) for the treatment of a patient with deep skin burns. Here, we present the first ever treated patient with cadaveric bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (CMSCs) in the history of Medicine.A young man, who severely burned 60% of his total body surface with 30% of full-thickness burns while working with a grass trimmer that exploded, was involved in the study. MSCs were obtained from the bone marrow of a cadaver donor in a routine procurement procedure of CUCAIBA, the Province of Buenos Aires, Argentina, Ministry of Health, Transplantation Agency, cultured, expanded, and applied on the burned surfaces using a fibrin spray after early escharotomy.So far, our preliminary experience and our early results have been very impressive showing an outstanding safety data as well as some impressive good results in the use of CMSCs.Based on all this, we think that improvements in the use of stem cells for burns might be possible in the near future and a lot of time as well as many lives could be saved by many other research teams all over the world. CMSCs will probably be a real scientific opportunity in Regenerative Medicine as well as in Transplantation.


Warmack R.A.,University of California at Los Angeles | Mansilla E.,Regenerative Medicine and Cell Therapies Laboratory | Goya R.G.,National University of La Plata | Clarke S.G.,University of California at Los Angeles
Rejuvenation Research | Year: 2016

The quantification of aspartic acid racemization in the proteins of nonmetabolically active tissues can be used as a measure of chronological aging in humans and other long-lived organisms. However, very few studies have been conducted in shorter-lived animals such as rodents, which are increasingly used as genetic and metabolic models of aging. An initial study had reported significant changes in the ratio of d- to l-aspartate in rat molars with age. Using a sensitive HPLC method for the determination of d- and l-aspartate from protein hydrolysates, we found no accumulation of d-aspartate in the molars of 17 rats that ranged in age from 2 to 44 months, and the amount of d-aspartate per molar did not correspond with molar eruption date as had been previously reported. However, developing an alternate approach, we found significant accumulation of isomerized aspartyl residues in eye lens proteins that are also formed by spontaneous degradation processes. In this study, we used the human protein l-isoaspartate/d-aspartate O-methyltransferase (PCMT1) as an analytical reagent in a sensitive and convenient procedure that could be used to rapidly examine multiple samples simultaneously. We found levels of isomerized aspartyl residues to be about 35 times higher in the lens extracts of 18-month-old rats versus 2-month-old rats, suggesting that isomerization may be an effective marker for biological aging in this range of ages. Importantly, we found that the accumulation appeared to plateau in rats of 18 months and older, indicating that potentially novel mechanisms for removing altered proteins may develop with age. © Mary Ann Liebert, Inc. 2016.


PubMed | Regenerative Medicine and Cell Therapies Laboratory, University of California at Los Angeles and National University of La Plata
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Rejuvenation research | Year: 2016

The quantification of aspartic acid racemization in the proteins of nonmetabolically active tissues can be used as a measure of chronological aging in humans and other long-lived organisms. However, very few studies have been conducted in shorter-lived animals such as rodents, which are increasingly used as genetic and metabolic models of aging. An initial study had reported significant changes in the ratio of d- to l-aspartate in rat molars with age. Using a sensitive HPLC method for the determination of d- and l-aspartate from protein hydrolysates, we found no accumulation of d-aspartate in the molars of 17 rats that ranged in age from 2 to 44 months, and the amount of d-aspartate per molar did not correspond with molar eruption date as had been previously reported. However, developing an alternate approach, we found significant accumulation of isomerized aspartyl residues in eye lens proteins that are also formed by spontaneous degradation processes. In this study, we used the human protein l-isoaspartate/d-aspartate O-methyltransferase (PCMT1) as an analytical reagent in a sensitive and convenient procedure that could be used to rapidly examine multiple samples simultaneously. We found levels of isomerized aspartyl residues to be about 35 times higher in the lens extracts of 18-month-old rats versus 2-month-old rats, suggesting that isomerization may be an effective marker for biological aging in this range of ages. Importantly, we found that the accumulation appeared to plateau in rats of 18 months and older, indicating that potentially novel mechanisms for removing altered proteins may develop with age.


Luengas S.L.P.,University of Puerto Rico at Mayaguez | Marin G.H.,Regenerative Medicine and Cell Therapies Laboratory | Aviles K.,University of Puerto Rico at San Juan | Acuna R.C.,University of Puerto Rico at San Juan | And 6 more authors.
Cancer Biotherapy and Radiopharmaceuticals | Year: 2014

The generation of singlet oxygen (SO) in the presence of specific photosensitizers (PSs) or semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) and its application in photodynamic therapy (PDT) is of great interest to develop cancer therapies with no need of surgery, chemotherapy, and/or radiotherapy. This work was focused on the identification of the main factors leading to the enhancement of SO production using Rose Bengal (RB), and Methylene Blue (MB) as PS species in organic and aqueous mediums. Subsequently, the capacity of zinc oxide (ZnO), zinc sulfide (ZnS), and ZnO/ZnS core-shell QDs as well as manganese (Mn+2) doped ZnO and ZnS nanoparticles (NPs) as potential PS was also investigated. Many variable parameters such as type of quencher, PSs, NPs, as well as its different concentrations, light source, excitation wavelength, reaction time, distance from light source, and nature of solvent were used. The degradation kinetics of the quenchers generated by SO species and the corresponding quantum yields were determined by monitoring the photo-oxidation of the chemical quencher and measuring its disappearance by fluorometry and spectrophotometry in the presence of NPs. Small intracellular changes of SO induced by these metal Zn (zinc) NPs and PDT could execute and accelerate deadly programs in these leukemic cells, providing in this way an innovative modality of treatment. In order to perform further more specific in vitro cytotoxic studies on B-chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells exposed to Zn NPs and PDT, we needed first to measure and ascertain those possible intracellular SO variations generated by this type of treatment; for this purpose, we have also developed and tested a novel method first described by us. © Copyright 2014, Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.


Mansilla E.,Regenerative Medicine and Cell Therapies Laboratory | Roque G.,Regenerative Medicine and Cell Therapies Laboratory | Sosa Y.E.,National University of La Plata | Tarditti A.,Regenerative Medicine and Cell Therapies Laboratory | Goya R.G.,National University of La Plata
Rejuvenation Research | Year: 2016

There is a growing interest in the potential of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) for implementing regenerative medicine. We assessed the effect of intravenous administration of human bone marrow-derived MSC on the life span of a single Sprague-Dawley female rat. The treatment was started when the rat was 6 months old and the cells were administered every 2 weeks afterward. The treatment did not induce any obvious changes in body growth or behavior and the rat showed the typical age changes for this strain, except that, unlike intact counterparts, the animal did not develop mammary tumors or pituitary gland hyperplasia. The more remarkable effect of the treatment was on life span, which was 44 months compared with an average of 36 months for intact laboratory rats. We conclude that despite the low N value, it is likely that the MSC treatment was responsible for the exceptionally long survival of the rat. The potential rewards of confirming the present findings warrant further studies involving higher N values. © Mary Ann Liebert, Inc. 2016.


PubMed | Regenerative Medicine and Cell Therapies Laboratory
Type: | Journal: Stem cells international | Year: 2011

One of the most important and complex diseases of modern society is metabolic syndrome. This syndrome has not been completely understood, and therefore an effective treatment is not available yet. We propose a possible stem cell mechanism involved in the development of metabolic syndrome. This way of thinking lets us consider also other significant pathologies that could have similar etiopathogenic pathways, like lipodystrophic syndromes, progeria, and aging. All these clinical situations could be the consequence of a progressive and persistent stem cell exhaustion syndrome (SCES). The main outcome of this SCES would be an irreversible loss of the effective regenerative mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) pools. In this way, the normal repairing capacities of the organism could become inefficient. Our point of view could open the possibility for a new strategy of treatment in metabolic syndrome, lipodystrophic syndromes, progeria, and even aging: stem cell therapies.


PubMed | Regenerative Medicine and Cell Therapies Laboratory and National University of La Plata
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Rejuvenation research | Year: 2016

There is a growing interest in the potential of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) for implementing regenerative medicine. We assessed the effect of intravenous administration of human bone marrow-derived MSC on the life span of a single Sprague-Dawley female rat. The treatment was started when the rat was 6 months old and the cells were administered every 2 weeks afterward. The treatment did not induce any obvious changes in body growth or behavior and the rat showed the typical age changes for this strain, except that, unlike intact counterparts, the animal did not develop mammary tumors or pituitary gland hyperplasia. The more remarkable effect of the treatment was on life span, which was 44 months compared with an average of 36 months for intact laboratory rats. We conclude that despite the low N value, it is likely that the MSC treatment was responsible for the exceptionally long survival of the rat. The potential rewards of confirming the present findings warrant further studies involving higher N values.

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