Middletown, CT, United States

Real-Time Analyzers, Inc.

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Middletown, CT, United States
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Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: | Award Amount: 144.99K | Year: 2012

This Small Business Innovation Research Phase I project will demonstrate feasibility by developing a novel sampling system to detect 103-4 cfu/g Salmonella typhimurium in spinach within 2 hours. Foodborne diseases resulting from Campylobacter, Escherichia, Listeria, Salmonella, Shigella and Vibrio species affect as many as 76 million persons in the United States each year, resulting in 325,000 hospitalizations and nearly 5,000 deaths. Unfortunately, current methods used to detect these pathogens rely on lengthy growth enrichment steps that take 1 to 4 days, negating effective prevention of contaminated food distribution and consumption. During the Phase II project, a prototype Foodborne Pathogen Analyzer will be developed to extract, detect, identify, and quantify the presence of the above listed pathogens in a variety of food matrices in 1 to 2 hours at the required sensitivity (e.g. 1-100 cfu/g).

The broader/commercial impacts of this research are 1) to detect pathogens in or on food in 1-2 hours, hence preventing the distribution and consumption of contaminated food, 2) to speed the process of identifying the source of an outbreak, helping minimize illnesses and deaths, and 3) to allow developing similar systems that can detect bioagents in support of the military and homeland security, and other infectious pathogens in support of medical diagnosis (e.g. detection of MRSA, HIV, TB).


Patent
Real-Time Analyzers, Inc. | Date: 2015-09-11

A kit of components is used in the detection, identification, analysis, and quantitation, by SERS, of a designated target analyte in a sample, comprising: packaging means normally containing a SER-active device component providing a support structure including a SER-active material, a collection component, a container component containing a liquid reagent comprised of a SER-active material, and a component for introducing the liquid reagent into the SER-active device. At least one of the SER-active materials is functionalized with an agent having the specific capability of binding the designated target analyte, and is accessible for the deposit thereon of liquid analyte samples. The SER-active device is constructed for receiving the liquid reagent and for enabling irradiation and collection of Raman-scattered radiation, by and from a Raman spectrometer, cooperatively generated by SER-active metals of the SER-active materials.


Grant
Agency: National Science Foundation | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 681.52K | Year: 2013

This Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase II project proposes to develop a prototype foodborne pathogen analyzer that will employ a novel credit card sized sampling device to extract, detect, identify, and quantify the presence of specific pathogens in food matrices in 1 - 2 hours at the required sensitivity (10 - 100 cfu/g). The goal is to extend the successful Phase I measurements of 104 cfu/g Salmonella typhimurium in spinach within 2 hours to 10-100 cfu/g S. typhimurium on equipment and in cheese, Listeria monocytogenes in cantaloupe, Escherichia coli O157:H7 in ground beef, and Campylobacter jejuni in poultry. Foodborne diseases affect as many as 50 million people in the United States each year, resulting in 130,000 hospitalizations and over 3,000 deaths. Unfortunately, current methods used to detect these pathogens rely on lengthy growth enrichment steps that take 1 - 4 days, negating effective prevention of contaminated food distribution and consumption. The broader impact/commercial potential of this project, if successful, will be the development of a platform technology to detect pathogens on food handling equipment or in food in 1 - 2 hours. This will benefit the food industry by increasing productivity, minimizing withdrawals and recalls, and most importantly, minimizing illness outbreaks and potentially saving lives. The small footprint of the analyzer will allow measurements in process plants and supporting labs, and eventually, at food sources, ports, and inspection stations. It can also speed the process of identifying the source of an outbreak, helping minimize illnesses and deaths. The knowledge gained by developing the proposed sampling system will allow developing similar systems that can monitor pathogens in water supplies, detect bioagents in air, and infectious pathogens in hospital patients (e.g. detection of Staphylococcus aureus, human immunodeficiency virus, Mycobacterium tuberculosis).


Grant
Agency: National Aeronautics and Space Administration | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 1.08M | Year: 2014

The goal of this proposed program through Phase III is to build a space-worthy Drug Stability Analyzer that can determine the extent of drug degradation. It will be able to monitor the drug active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) and its degradation product concentrations as a function of time, as well as determine if a drug is suitable for use. This will be accomplished by designing and building a rugged, small, low mass, low power, easy to use analyzer that can identify and quantify API and degradation products with little or no sample handling in 1 minute. Feasibility was successfully demonstrated during Phase I by measuring acetaminophen, azithromycin, epinephrine, lidocaine, and their degradation products in mixtures and during reaction with a 1-4% limit of detection. The API's were also successfully measured in commercial products. During the Phase II program a prototype Drug Stability Analyzer, suitable for space deployment will be built and used to measure the degradants of all the ISS medical kit drugs (>100) with an accuracy goal of 2% and a precision goal of 1% within 1 minute. The Drug Stability Analyzer will be transitioned from a TRL 3 to a 7 (ground tested).


Grant
Agency: National Aeronautics and Space Administration | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 125.00K | Year: 2013

The overall goal of this proposed program (through Phase III) is to build a space-worthy Drug Stability Analyzer that can determine the extent of drug degradation. It will be able to monitor the drug active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) and its degradation product concentrations as a function of time, as well as determine if a drug is suitable for use (likely based on the presence of 90% or more of the original API concentration). This will be accomplished by designing and building a rugged, small, light weight, low power, easy to use analyzer with appropriate software, which can identify and quantify API and degradation products with little or no sample handling in 1 minute. Feasibility will be demonstrated during Phase I by successfully measuring acetaminophen, azithromycin, epinephrine, lidocaine, and their degradation products at percent level concentrations.The overall goal of the Phase II program is to build a working prototype Drug Stability Analyzer that is suitable for space deployment (e.g. aboard the ISS) and capable of monitoring drug degradation. The ability of the analyzer to nondestructively quantify the amount of the API and the degradation products, would also allow assessing drug potency at the time of use to ensure crewmember safety. The Drug Stability Analyzer will be transitioned from a Technology Readiness Level 3 to a 7 (ground tested) from the beginning to the end of the program.


Grant
Agency: Department of Health and Human Services | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 156.53K | Year: 2012

DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): The overall aim of this SBIR program is to develop a surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) based device for on-site analysis of drugs in saliva. This device will allow immediate assessment of both medicinal and illicit drug use by patients with substance-related disorders (SRDs), and provide medical professionals and management with quantitative data so that treatment decisions can be made. Successful treatments for SRD patients require frequent monitoring of both medicinal and illicit drug use, which are mostly done in outpatient settings (doctor's office, rehabilitation centers, etc.) employing urine- based drug tests. For such tests, a sample is screened with immunoassay test kits, and if a drug is present, it isconfirmed and quantified by gas chromatography - mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Unfortunately, immunoassay test kits are susceptible to false positives, while the GC-MS method is time consuming and requires highly trained operators and a laboratory setting. Consequently, there is a critical need for a device that combines the portability, speed and ease-of-use of immunoassay kits with the identification and quantitation abilities of GC-MS so that health care personnel can assess SRD patient compliance in outpatient settings. The proposed SERS Saliva Analyzer (SSA) will meet all such requirements by providing health care personnel an easy-to-use device, which will extract, identify and quantify the presence of drugs (and metabolites) at requisite levels in saliva(1-50 ng/mL), within 10 minutes. The overall aim of the Phase I program is to demonstrate feasibility by detecting two priority drugs (cocaine and diazepam) in saliva at physiologically relevant concentrations and analysis time. This will be accomplishedby 1) measuring cocaine and diazepam at required sensitivity, and 2) measuring cocaine and diazepam in saliva. PUBLIC HEALTH RELEVANCE: The overall aim of this SBIR program is to develop a surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) based device foron-site analysis of drugs in saliva. This device will allow immediate assessment of both medicinal and illicit drug use by patients with substance-related disorders (SRDs), and provide medical professionals and management with quantitative data so that treatment decisions can be made.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: SMALL BUSINESS PHASE II | Award Amount: 695.52K | Year: 2013

This Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase II project proposes to develop a prototype foodborne pathogen analyzer that will employ a novel credit card sized sampling device to extract, detect, identify, and quantify the presence of specific pathogens in food matrices in 1 - 2 hours at the required sensitivity (10 - 100 cfu/g). The goal is to extend the successful Phase I measurements of 104 cfu/g Salmonella typhimurium in spinach within 2 hours to 10-100 cfu/g S. typhimurium on equipment and in cheese, Listeria monocytogenes in cantaloupe, Escherichia coli O157:H7 in ground beef, and Campylobacter jejuni in poultry. Foodborne diseases affect as many as 50 million people in the United States each year, resulting in 130,000 hospitalizations and over 3,000 deaths. Unfortunately, current methods used to detect these pathogens rely on lengthy growth enrichment steps that take 1 - 4 days, negating effective prevention of contaminated food distribution and consumption.

The broader impact/commercial potential of this project, if successful, will be the development of a platform technology to detect pathogens on food handling equipment or in food in 1 - 2 hours. This will benefit the food industry by increasing productivity, minimizing withdrawals and recalls, and most importantly, minimizing illness outbreaks and potentially saving lives. The small footprint of the analyzer will allow measurements in process plants and supporting labs, and eventually, at food sources, ports, and inspection stations. It can also speed the process of identifying the source of an outbreak, helping minimize illnesses and deaths. The knowledge gained by developing the proposed sampling system will allow developing similar systems that can monitor pathogens in water supplies, detect bioagents in air, and infectious pathogens in hospital patients (e.g. detection of Staphylococcus aureus, human immunodeficiency virus, Mycobacterium tuberculosis).


Grant
Agency: National Science Foundation | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 144.99K | Year: 2012

This Small Business Innovation Research Phase I project will demonstrate feasibility by developing a novel sampling system to detect 103-4 cfu/g Salmonella typhimurium in spinach within 2 hours. Foodborne diseases resulting from Campylobacter, Escherichia, Listeria, Salmonella, Shigella and Vibrio species affect as many as 76 million persons in the United States each year, resulting in 325,000 hospitalizations and nearly 5,000 deaths. Unfortunately, current methods used to detect these pathogens rely on lengthy growth enrichment steps that take 1 to 4 days, negating effective prevention of contaminated food distribution and consumption. During the Phase II project, a prototype Foodborne Pathogen Analyzer will be developed to extract, detect, identify, and quantify the presence of the above listed pathogens in a variety of food matrices in 1 to 2 hours at the required sensitivity (e.g. 1-100 cfu/g). The broader/commercial impacts of this research are 1) to detect pathogens in or on food in 1-2 hours, hence preventing the distribution and consumption of contaminated food, 2) to speed the process of identifying the source of an outbreak, helping minimize illnesses and deaths, and 3) to allow developing similar systems that can detect bioagents in support of the military and homeland security, and other infectious pathogens in support of medical diagnosis (e.g. detection of MRSA, HIV, TB).


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Defense Health Program | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 150.00K | Year: 2014

The overall goal of this proposed project (through Phase III) is to develop a field-ready, easy to use Pathogen Analyzer to rapidly identify, quantify, and characterize viability of microbial pathogens in food and water at the required sensitivity (e.g. 1-1000 cfu/g). During the Phase I project, feasibility will be demonstrated by developing a novel probe used to detect 103-4 cfu/g of Salmonella spp. in cucumber within 4 hours. The overall goal of the Phase II project is to develop a prototype Pathogen Analyzer to rapidly identify, quantify, and characterize viability of priority pathogens in a variety of foods and water in 3 to 4 hours at the required sensitivity.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Army | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 999.26K | Year: 2015

The overall goal of this proposed program (through Phase III) is to develop an innovative Portable Fuel Quality Analyzer (PFQA) capable of providing a final fuel quality check of jet and diesel fuels at the point-of-use as either a stand-alone analyzer or

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