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Middletown, CT, United States

Pan Y.-L.,U.S. Army | Huang H.,Real-Time Analyzers, Inc. | Chang R.K.,Yale University
Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy and Radiative Transfer | Year: 2012

Fluorescence spectra from individual micron-sized atmospheric aerosol particles were measured by a Dual-wavelength-excitation Particle Fluorescence Spectrometer (DPFS). Particles were drawn into our laboratory at Adelphi, MD, an urban site in the Washington, DC, metroplex and within the Yale University campus at New Haven, CT. Two fluorescence spectra were obtained for every individual particle as it was moving through the DPFS system and excited sequentially by single laser pulses at 263 and 351. nm. There were around ten to a few hundred particles detected per second and up to a few million per day within the 1-10. μm particle size range. The majority of the particles have weak fluorescence, but 10-50% of the particles have fluorescence signals above the noise level at both sites at different time period. For the first time, these Ultra Violet laser-induced-fluorescence (UV-LIF) spectra from individual particles were integrated every 10. min, which forms a group of about a few thousand to a few tens of thousand particles, to provide the averaged background atmospheric fluorescence spectral profiles which may be helpful in the development of bioaerosol detection systems, particularly those systems based on integrated fluorescence from a group of aerosol particles, such as Light Detection And Rangeing (LIDAR) remotor biosensor and the point sensor based on collected particles on substrate. These integrated spectral profiles had small variations from time to time and were distinguishable from that of the bacterial simulant B. subtilis. Also for the first time, the individual spectra excited by a 351. nm laser were grouped using unstructured hierarchical cluster analysis, with parameters chosen so that spectra clustered into 8 main categories. They showed less spectral variations than that excited by a 263-nm laser. Over 98% of the spectra were able to be grouped into 8 clusters, and over 90% of the fluorescent particles were in clusters 3-5 with a fluorescence emission peak around 420-470. nm; these were mostly from biological and organic carbon-containing compounds. Integrated fluorescence spectral profiles and averaged spectra for each cluster show high similarity between New Haven, CT and Adelphi, MD. © 2012. Source


Grant
Agency: National Aeronautics and Space Administration | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 749.48K | Year: 2014

The goal of this proposed program through Phase III is to build a space-worthy Drug Stability Analyzer that can determine the extent of drug degradation. It will be able to monitor the drug active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) and its degradation product concentrations as a function of time, as well as determine if a drug is suitable for use. This will be accomplished by designing and building a rugged, small, low mass, low power, easy to use analyzer that can identify and quantify API and degradation products with little or no sample handling in 1 minute. Feasibility was successfully demonstrated during Phase I by measuring acetaminophen, azithromycin, epinephrine, lidocaine, and their degradation products in mixtures and during reaction with a 1-4% limit of detection. The API's were also successfully measured in commercial products. During the Phase II program a prototype Drug Stability Analyzer, suitable for space deployment will be built and used to measure the degradants of all the ISS medical kit drugs (>100) with an accuracy goal of 2% and a precision goal of 1% within 1 minute. The Drug Stability Analyzer will be transitioned from a TRL 3 to a 7 (ground tested).


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Navy | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 750.00K | Year: 2011

The goal of this Phase II program is to bring the Marine Corps (RTA) Fuel Analyzer to a readiness level sufficient for production. This will accomplished by building three test units to establish temperature use range and validate fuel property analysis.


Grant
Agency: Department of Health and Human Services | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 156.53K | Year: 2012

DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): The overall aim of this SBIR program is to develop a surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) based device for on-site analysis of drugs in saliva. This device will allow immediate assessment of both medicinal and illicit drug use by patients with substance-related disorders (SRDs), and provide medical professionals and management with quantitative data so that treatment decisions can be made. Successful treatments for SRD patients require frequent monitoring of both medicinal and illicit drug use, which are mostly done in outpatient settings (doctor's office, rehabilitation centers, etc.) employing urine- based drug tests. For such tests, a sample is screened with immunoassay test kits, and if a drug is present, it isconfirmed and quantified by gas chromatography - mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Unfortunately, immunoassay test kits are susceptible to false positives, while the GC-MS method is time consuming and requires highly trained operators and a laboratory setting. Consequently, there is a critical need for a device that combines the portability, speed and ease-of-use of immunoassay kits with the identification and quantitation abilities of GC-MS so that health care personnel can assess SRD patient compliance in outpatient settings. The proposed SERS Saliva Analyzer (SSA) will meet all such requirements by providing health care personnel an easy-to-use device, which will extract, identify and quantify the presence of drugs (and metabolites) at requisite levels in saliva(1-50 ng/mL), within 10 minutes. The overall aim of the Phase I program is to demonstrate feasibility by detecting two priority drugs (cocaine and diazepam) in saliva at physiologically relevant concentrations and analysis time. This will be accomplishedby 1) measuring cocaine and diazepam at required sensitivity, and 2) measuring cocaine and diazepam in saliva. PUBLIC HEALTH RELEVANCE: The overall aim of this SBIR program is to develop a surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) based device foron-site analysis of drugs in saliva. This device will allow immediate assessment of both medicinal and illicit drug use by patients with substance-related disorders (SRDs), and provide medical professionals and management with quantitative data so that treatment decisions can be made.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Army | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 999.26K | Year: 2015

The overall goal of this proposed program (through Phase III) is to develop an innovative Portable Fuel Quality Analyzer (PFQA) capable of providing a final fuel quality check of jet and diesel fuels at the point-of-use as either a stand-alone analyzer or

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