Salt Lake City, UT, United States

Reaction Engineering International

www.reaction-eng.com
Salt Lake City, UT, United States
SEARCH FILTERS
Time filter
Source Type

Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Navy | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 750.00K | Year: 2011

The objective of the proposed Phase II STTR effort is to develop a validated computational tool to predict the afterburning of non-ideal munitions containing metal and hydrocarbon fuels. The activities outlined devise a well-coordinated collaboration among researchers from Reaction Engineering International (REI) and the State University of New York at Buffalo (UB). The activities proposed will build on the previous collaboration between REI and UB in modeling and simulation of advanced computational frameworks for abnormal thermal and mechanical environments. The modeling strategy proposed includes several unique features that are important for understanding and predicting the ignition of compressible multiphase flows. These effects include both heterogeneous and homogeneous particle reactions, particle compressibility, and a turbulence modeling approach that naturally includes effects of group combustion. The modeling will be housed into a new 3D supervisory simulation framework pioneered by REI for examining blast environments that includes support for complex geometries and a variety of explosives. It is anticipated that the final tool will be commercialized for both military and non-military customers to either design or better understand the blast loads from non-ideal explosives.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Navy | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 512.99K | Year: 2015

The objective of the proposed Phase II STTR effort is to develop a validated computational tool to predict the afterburning of non-ideal munitions containing metal and hydrocarbon fuels. The activities outlined devise a well-coordinated collaboration among researchers from Reaction Engineering International (REI) and the State University of New York at Buffalo (UB). The activities proposed will build on the previous collaboration between REI and UB in modeling and simulation of advanced computational frameworks for abnormal thermal and mechanical environments. The modeling strategy proposed includes several unique features that are important for understanding and predicting the ignition of compressible multiphase flows. These effects include both heterogeneous and homogeneous particle reactions, particle compressibility, and a turbulence modeling approach that naturally includes effects of group combustion. The modeling will be housed into a new supervisory simulation framework pioneered by REI for examining blast environments that includes support for complex geometries and a variety of explosives. It is anticipated that the final tool will be commercialized for both military and non-military customers to either design or better understand the blast loads from non-ideal explosives.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Navy | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 500.00K | Year: 2010

Investigations into JP-10 combustion chemistry thus far can be characterized as preliminary. The detailed chemical kinetic mechanisms that have been published are limited in their ability to reproduce experimental data. The combustion chemistry of JP-10 is highly complex, involving hundreds if not thousands of species and thousands of chemical reactions. A detailed kinetic model capable of predicting ignition delay, heat release, and species concentrations is an important step toward understanding more complex, multidimensional phenomena such as flame-holding and extinction behavior in ramjet and scramjet applications. The proposed Phase II project will complete the development of a pressure dependent, detailed chemical kinetic mechanism for combustion and pyrolysis of JP-10 started in the Phase I project. The comprehensive mechanism will be validated against literature data and new data generated in Phase II. The mechanism will be in Chemkin format and will include thermodynamic and transport properties for all species. The mechanism will be derived from fundamental thermochemical principles using high-level quantum chemistry calculations, without extensive tuning to match data. Adjustments to rate parameters will be limited to the uncertainties of the methods used to obtain them. Transport properties of individual species will be developed from quantum chemistry and group additivity calculations.


Grant
Agency: Department of Energy | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 149.94K | Year: 2015

Problem Statement: Well perforations, which have a significant impact on oil and gas production, are routinely performed in the well completion process using shaped-charge jets. Because of the complexity of the perforation process, charge designers rely on expensive experimentation and end-users (operators and service providers) of perforators rely primarily on vendor catalog data to select shaped-charges for their wells. Significant improvements could be achieved in shape-charge designs and in end-user selection of charges with predictive modeling and simulation capabilities for perforation with accurate representations of down-hole conditions and target formation properties. Industry experts estimate that optimized shaped-charges could increase production by 20-50%. Proposed Solution: Only recently has computer modeling of the complex phenomena of shaped-charge perforations been feasible due to advancements in high-performance computing and advanced geomaterials modeling by the DoE ASC Center (CSAFE) at the University of Utah. However, the computational requirements of the software are significant and the level-of-expertise required to set up and perform the simulations is high, making the use of the software prohibitive to most small and medium sized companies. Using our expertise, the Phase I work effort will demonstrate running the HPC model on cloud resources with a prototype web interface (using a Software-as-a-Service model), and live-fire tests will be conducted and used to further validate the modeling and simulation capabilities. Commercial Applications and Other Benefits: The final product of the proposed work, available following a Phase II effort, will be a turn-key, cloud-based, easy-to-use, computationally efficient solution for simulating well perforations using shaped-charge perforators into a library of formation types, using cutting-edge HPC perforation modeling capabilities. The customers of the SaaS HPC perforation model will be shaped charge manufacturers, looking to optimize charge designs, and end-users of charges, looking for optimal selection from vendor offerings. The market for end-users consists of both new well perforations and existing well re-perforations. A relatively low cost per simulation and the strong possibility of enhanced well productivity make an excellent customer value proposition for the model. Keywords: shaped-charge, well completion, geomaterials, penetration, HPC, software-as-a-service, modeling and simulation, oil, natural gas Summary for Members of Congress The production from oil and gas wells is strongly affected by the holes made from the well-bore into the surrounding rock using explosives charges. This project will enhance production by providing cloud-based, high-performance computing software to assist in the design and selection of the penetrating charges.


Grant
Agency: Department of Energy | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 149.93K | Year: 2015

Problem Statement: The evolution of hydraulic fracturing has enabled development of unconventional natural gas resources that previously would not have been economical. The volume of water required for these operations is a major concern. Industry is actively seeking methods to reduce water usage and increase the amount of gas recovered per unit of water used to stimulate the formation. There is substantial evidence that the rate and method of flowback of the fracturing fluid has a significant impact on the amount of water recovered and well productivity. Proposed Solution: REI proposes to develop a multiphase Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model and an accompanying reduced order model (ROM) tool to predict flowback of the fracturing fluid from a well over time. The ROM tool will use a database of CFD solutions to provide quick estimates of the flowback rate and the potential impact on future gas production. The ROM will be designed to allow field operators and fracturing service companies to optimize the amount of water injected during stimulation, recover more of the injected water and increase the expected ultimate recovery of the natural gas in the formation. Phase I Work Plan REI will develop a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model of the Flowback process using the ANSYS/Fluent commercial CFD code. A database of CFD model solutions for flowback will be generated. A reduced order model (ROM) tool will be created using the database of CFD solutions. The CFD solutions and ROM tool will be benchmarked against field data. Commercial Applications and Other Benefits: The completed ROM tool will allow field operators and fracturing service companies to (a) optimize the flowback rate and recovery of the fracturing fluid (primarily water) before stimulating a well and (b) history match real flowback data with the model to better understand the geometry properties of the produced fractures. This will result in less water usage per fracturing job, higher recovery rates of water from the well, higher initial production rates and higher ultimate recovery of the resource. This will allow the United States to continue to lead in natural gas production while lowering the amount of water used. Key Words: hydraulic fracturing, flowback, well cleanup, unconventional Summary for Members of Congress This project will develop a computational tool designed to allow engineers to optimize the injection and recovery of water used in hydraulic fracturing operations. The proposed technology will improve the efficiency of natural gas production from unconventional resources and reduce the amount of water used.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Navy | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 749.98K | Year: 2013

With the current state of world events, the threat of buried explosives used against military vehicles is more pronounced than ever before. The introduction of the MRAP and MTVR vehicles have helped mitigate this threat to a degree, but military personnel continue to suffer from both death and serious bodily injury as a result of IED/mine explosions. To address this need, improved comprehensive simulation capabilities are needed to help design improved safety components for vehicle occupants. The proposed effort, which builds on previous work performed under US Army funding, will develop next-generation simulation capabilities to better predict the effects of buried explosives on ground vehicles and occupants. Blast and soil modeling will be performed using advanced simulation tools developed as part of the DoE ASCI program at the University of Utah and the vehicles will be modeled with the LS-DYNA FE code. Occupant modeling will be performed using LS-DYNA. The final product of the Phase II will be a micro-coupled MPMICE-LS-DYNA model, which leverages the best capabilities of each simulation tool. Comparisons will be made between simulations of the MTVR exposed to a buried threat and live-fire test data for the same configuration.


Grant
Agency: Department of Energy | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 1.00M | Year: 2011

Coal gasification plants have exhibited sub-par performance and plant economics due to poor reliability and availability. A major contributor to the poor performance has been fouling of the syngas cooler located downstream of the gasifier. The fouling is due to vaporized ash from the coal gasification process depositing on the fireside surface of the tubes in the fire tube heat exchanger used for convective syngas cooling. At present the understanding of the fouling mechanism for coal gasification is not adequately understood for equipment vendors to develop a solution. In this project we will develop a soot blowing technology tailored to the coal gasification conditions that exist in the convective syngas cooler used at coal gasification plants. The new soot blower design will be based on an improved understanding of the relevant governing mechanisms for fouling developed in this project. The new soot blower technology will be designed to have the option to be combined with anti-fouling coatings that could be applied to heat exchanger surfaces in the syngas cooler. Commercial Applications and Other Benefits: The target application for the soot blower technology developed in this project is coal gasification plants producing syngas for use in power generation, refinery and chemical production applications. If successful, the soot blower technology will improve the reliability and availability of coal gasification plants, reducing the US dependence on foreign energy sources and reduce green house gas emissions.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Army | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 99.96K | Year: 2014

Rapid prediction of convection heat transfer requires the solution to a problem that is too complicated to model analytically and too time consuming to model using traditional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) capabilities. These limitations have a significant affect on vehicle survivability assessments, which require accurate convective thermal modeling in order to reach goals associated to thermal infrared (IR) signatures. The proposed Phase I work effort would address these shortcomings by implementing a Fast Fluid Dynamics (FFD) algorithm on more technologically advanced Graphics Processing Units (GPUs). The FFD methods run in a fraction of the time of traditional CFD frameworks and when combined with advances in current GPUs will allow for the rapid prediction of convection heat transfer around complex geometry. The algorithms, selected for accuracy, efficiency, and operator ease-of-use, will be utilized to develop a convective heat transfer framework that will be verified against experimental data. The proposed advances in convective modeling would allow real-time or near real-time predictions of gas phase heat transfer. These results from the proposed efforts will greatly increase the accuracy in thermal management modeling and IR signatures thereby allowing for better military vehicle survivability assessments.


Grant
Agency: Department of Energy | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 100.00K | Year: 2010

Coal gasification plants have exhibited sub-par performance and plant economics due to poor reliability and availability. A major contributor to the poor performance has been fouling of the syngas cooler located downstream of the gasifier. The fouling is due to vaporized ash from the coal gasification process depositing on the inner walls of the tubes in the fire tube heat exchanger used in the syngas cooler. At present the understanding of the fouling mechanism for coal gasification is not adequately understood for equipment vendors to develop a solution. In this project we will develop a soot blowing technology tailored to the coal gasification conditions that exist a syngas cooler used at coal gasification plants. The new soot blower design will be based on an improved understanding of the governing mechanisms for syngas cooler fouling which will develop within this project. Commercial Applications and Other Benefits: The target application for the soot blower technology developed in this project is coal gasification plants producing syngas for use in refining power generation and chemical applications. If successful, the developed soot blower technology will improve the reliability and availability of coal gasification plants. This will help reduce the US dependence on foreign energy sources and aid in reducing green house gas emissions.


Grant
Agency: Department of Energy | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 999.62K | Year: 2016

The evolution of hydraulic fracturing has enabled development of unconventional natural gas resources that previously would not have been economical. The volume of water required for these operations is a major concern. Industry is actively seeking methods to reduce water usage and increase the amount of gas recovered per unit of water used to stimulate the formation. There is substantial evidence that the rate and method of flowback of the fracturing fluid has a significant impact on the amount of water recovered and well productivity. Proposed Solution: REI proposes to develop a multiphase Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model and an accompanying reduced order model (ROM) tool to predict flowback of the fracturing fluid from a well over time. The ROM tool will use a database of CFD solutions to provide quick estimates of the flowback rate and the potential impact on future gas production. The ROM will be designed to allow field operators and fracturing service companies to optimize the amount of water injected during stimulation, recover more of the injected water and increase the expected ultimate recovery of the natural gas in the formation. Phase I Work Plan REI will develop a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model of the Flowback process using the ANSYS/Fluent commercial CFD code. A database of CFD model solutions for flowback will be generated. A reduced order model (ROM) tool will be created using the database of CFD solutions. The CFD solutions and ROM tool will be benchmarked against field data. Commercial Applications and Other Benefits: The completed ROM tool will allow field operators and fracturing service companies to (a) optimize the flowback rate and recovery of the fracturing fluid (primarily water) before stimulating a well and (b) history match real flowback data with the model to better understand the geometry properties of the produced fractures. This will result in less water usage per fracturing job, higher recovery rates of water from the well, higher initial production rates and higher ultimate recovery of the resource. This will allow the United States to continue to lead in natural gas production while lowering the amount of water used.

Loading Reaction Engineering International collaborators
Loading Reaction Engineering International collaborators