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Schinke S.,Columbia University | Schwinn T.,Columbia University | Hopkins J.,Columbia University | Gorroochurn P.,Columbia University | Wahlstrom L.,Trial Reach Inc.
Substance Use and Misuse | Year: 2016

Background: Growing moves in the U.S. toward relaxed laws surrounding adult use of marijuana raise concerns about concurrent increases in adolescent use of marijuana. Objectives: This study collected and analyzed primary data on the relationship between marijuana legalization status in U.S. states and adolescents' marijuana use. Methods: Recruited through social networking sites and youth-services community agencies, a sample of 1,310 adolescents from 48 U.S. states and the District of Columbia reported their use of marijuana. Youths' use rates were compared with the marijuana legalization status of youths' states of residence. Results: Study findings failed to show a relationship between adolescents' use of marijuana and state laws regarding marijuana use. Relationships were found for increased marijuana use by older youths, females, and non-Hispanic youths. Youths whose parents completed 2 or more years of college were less likely to report marijuana use than those whose parents completed fewer than 2 years of college. Conclusions: Albeit study findings do not support predictions of growing marijuana use by adolescents in states with liberalized adult use laws, further monitoring of adolescents' use with larger and more representative samples is needed. © 2016 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC


Schinke S.,Columbia University | Schwinn T.,Columbia University | Hopkins J.,Columbia University | Wahlstrom L.,Trial Reach Inc.
Preventive Medicine Reports | Year: 2016

Drug use is a disquieting problem among the growing population of U.S. Hispanic adolescents. This study examined risk and protective factors associated with drug use in a sample of 507 Hispanic adolescents. Data were collected in 2014 and 2015 from youths across the United States. The sample had a mean age of 14.1 years and was 37.3% male. Youths responded to an online questionnaire about their drug use and risk and protective factors associated with drug use. Negative self-image, higher levels of stress, weaker coping skills, peer drug use, lower levels of self-control, goal-setting, problem-solving skills, and self-efficacy, and higher intentions to use drugs in the future were associated with increased odds of past-month drug use. Youths with higher self-images who spoke mostly English at home were less likely to use drugs than youths with higher self-images who spoke mostly Spanish at home.Study results have implications for gaining a better understanding of drug use risk and protective factors among America's growing population of Hispanic adolescents. Efforts to better examine and enhance Hispanic youths' cognitive-behavioral skills seem a wise investment. © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc.


PubMed | Trial Reach Inc. and Columbia University
Type: | Journal: Preventive medicine reports | Year: 2016

Drug use is a disquieting problem among the growing population of U.S. Hispanic adolescents. This study examined risk and protective factors associated with drug use in a sample of 507 Hispanic adolescents. Data were collected in 2014 and 2015 from youths across the United States. The sample had a mean age of 14.1years and was 37.3% male. Youths responded to an online questionnaire about their drug use and risk and protective factors associated with drug use. Negative self-image, higher levels of stress, weaker coping skills, peer drug use, lower levels of self-control, goal-setting, problem-solving skills, and self-efficacy, and higher intentions to use drugs in the future were associated with increased odds of past-month drug use. Youths with higher self-images who spoke mostly English at home were less likely to use drugs than youths with higher self-images who spoke mostly Spanish at home.Study results have implications for gaining a better understanding of drug use risk and protective factors among Americas growing population of Hispanic adolescents. Efforts to better examine and enhance Hispanic youths cognitive-behavioral skills seem a wise investment.

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