Bangkok, Thailand
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Amiot R.,CAS Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology | Amiot R.,University Claude Bernard Lyon 1 | Buffetaut E.,CNRS ENS Geology Laboratory | Lecuyer C.,University Claude Bernard Lyon 1 | And 15 more authors.
Geology | Year: 2010

Spinosaurs were large theropod dinosaurs showing peculiar specializations, including somewhat crocodile-like elongate jaws and conical teeth. Their biology has been much discussed, and a piscivorous diet has been suggested on the basis of jaw as well as tooth morphology and stomach contents. Although fish eating has been considered plausible, an aquatic or semiaquatic lifestyle has seldom been suggested because of the apparent lack of corresponding adaptations in the postcranial skeleton of spinosaurs, which on the whole is reminiscent of that of other large terrestrial theropods. On the basis of the oxygen isotopic composition of their phosphatic remains compared with those of coexisting terrestrial theropod dinosaurs and semiaquatic crocodilians and turtles, we conclude that spinosaurs had semiaquatic lifestyles, i.e., they spent a large part of their daily time in water, like extant crocodilians or hippopotamuses. This result sheds light on niche partitioning between large predatory dinosaurs, since spinosaurs coexisted with other large theropods such as carcharodontosaurids or tyrannosaurids. The likely ichthyophagy and aquatic habits of spinosaurids may have allowed them to coexist with other large theropods by reducing competition for food and territory. © 2010 Geological Society of America.


Macdonald A.S.,2336 Ridge Road | Barr S.M.,Acadia University | Miller B.V.,Texas A&M University | Reynolds P.H.,Dalhousie University | And 2 more authors.
Journal of Asian Earth Sciences | Year: 2010

The western gneiss belt in northern Thailand is exposed within two overlapping Cenozoic structural domains: the extensional Doi Inthanon metamorphic core complex domain located west of the Chiang Mai basin, and the Mae Ping strike-slip fault domain located west of the Tak batholith. New P-T estimates and U-Pb and 40Ar/39Ar age determinations from the Doi Inthanon domain show that the gneiss there records a complex multi-stage history that can be represented by a clockwise P-T-t path. U-Pb zircon and titanite dating of mylonitic calc-silicate gneiss from the Mae Wang area of the complex indicates that the paragneissic sequence experienced high-grade, medium-pressure metamorphism (M1) in the Late Triassic - Early Jurassic (ca. 210 Ma), in good agreement with previously determined zircon ages from the underlying core orthogneiss exposed on Doi Inthanon. Late Cretaceous monazite ages of 84 and 72 Ma reported previously from the core orthogneiss are attributed to a thermal overprint (M2) to upper-amphibolite facies in the sillimanite field. U-Pb zircon and monazite dating of granitic mylonite from the Doi Suthep area of the complex provides an upper age limit of 40 Ma (Late Eocene) for the early stage(s) of development of the actual core complex, by initially ductile, low-angle extensional shearing under lower amphibolite-facies conditions (M3), accompanied by near-isothermal diapiric rise and decompression melting. 40Ar/39Ar laserprobe dating of muscovite from both Doi Suthep and Doi Inthanon provided Miocene ages of ca. 26-15 Ma, representing cooling through the ca. 350 °C isotherm and marking late-stage development of the core complex by detachment faulting of the cover rocks and isostatic uplift of the sheared core zone and mantling gneisses in the footwall. Similarities in the thermochronology of high-grade gneisses exposed in the core complex and shear zone domains in the western gneiss belt of northern Thailand (and also in northern Vietnam, Laos, Yunnan, and central Myanmar) suggest a complex regional response to indentation of Southeast Asia by India. © 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


Yawsangratt S.,Adam Mickiewicz University | Szczucinski W.,Adam Mickiewicz University | Chaimanee N.,CCOP | Chatprasert S.,Rama VI Road | And 2 more authors.
Natural Hazards | Year: 2012

The 2004 tsunami deposits and probable paleotsunami deposits were studied at the southern Kho Khao Island, on Andaman Sea coast of Thailand. The 2004 tsunami laid down about 8 cm of fining upward medium sand and locally about 40 cm of massive coarse sand with common mud clasts. The sediments were characterized by the presence of marine foraminiferal assemblage; however, already after 5 years many of carbonate foraminiferal tests were partly or completely dissolved. The probable paleotsunami deposits form layer about 1 m thick. It consists of massive very coarse sand with common big shells and mud clasts. Its composition suggests a marine origin and the presence of mud clasts, and similarity to the 2004 tsunami deposits suggests that the layer was left by paleotsunami, which took place probably during the late Holocene, even though two shells within the layer gave 14C ages of 40,000 years or more. © 2011 The Author(s).


Deesri U.,Mahasarakham University | Lauprasert K.,Mahasarakham University | Suteethorn V.,Mahasarakham University | Wongko K.,Rama VI Road | Cavin L.,Museum dHistoire Naturelle
Acta Palaeontologica Polonica | Year: 2014

A new ginglymodian fish, Isanichthys lertboosi, is described from the Phu Kradung Formation, north-eastern Thailand, a freshwater deposit of probable Late Jurassic age. The species is represented by four specimens, from the Phu Noi locality, associated with a rich fauna of sharks, turtles, crocodiles, and theropod and sauropod dinosaurs. One specimen is an isolated braincase, which provides characters rarely observed in extinct ginglymodians. The species is referred to the genus Isanichthys, a taxon originally described on the basis of a single specimen from the Phu Nam Jun locality, a slightly younger site approximately 75 km from Phu Noi. Isanichthys is mainly distinguished by frontals slightly narrower anteriorly than posteriorly, two anterior infraorbitals not in contact with the orbit, reduced preorbital region, and a small orbit and a cheek region completely covered by bones. The new species is characterized, among other characters, by a dermal component of the sphenotic visible on the cheek, one pair of extrascapulars plus a small median one, the presence of few suborbitals (ca. 4 or 6) arranged in one row, and a median dorsal row of scales with spine. Comparisons with other ginglymodian taxa and a cladistic analysis indicates that Isanichthys (Lepidotes) latifrons from the Late Jurassic of England, as well as probably Isanichthys (Lepidotes) luchowensis from the Early or Middle Jurassic of Sichuan, China, form a clade with both Thai species of Isanichthys. The new species provides evidence of the high diversity of ginglymodian fishes in the Phu Kradung Formation and suggests a new hypothesis of phylogenetic relationships among extinct ginglymodians. © 2014 U. Deesri et al.


Saengsrichan W.,Rama VI Road | Saengsrichan W.,Chulalongkorn University | Charoentitirat T.,Chulalongkorn University | Meesook A.,Rama VI Road | And 2 more authors.
Gondwana Research | Year: 2011

The Thung Yai Group extends over a large area of peninsular Thailand, along the eastern margin of the Shan Thai block. Bound by angular unconformities 300. m thick dominantly detritic brackish to non-marine deposits with few intercalated limestone beds between Triassic marine and Tertiary non-marine sediments, represent the Thung Yai Group that comprises four formations: Khlong Min, Lam Thap, Sam Chom, and Phun Phin Formations. In the Ao Luk-Plai Phraya (ALPP) area, the Khlong Min and Lam Thap formations yield marine, brackish-water and non-marine fossil assemblages. These include trace fossils and for the first time in peninsular southern Thailand, the bivalve Parvamussium donaiense Mansuy, 1914. Based on fossil determinations, the Thung Yai Group has a late Early Jurassic to Early Cretaceous age. Our new observations help unravel the tectonic history of Mesozoic Peninsular Thailand. After the complete closure of the Paleotethys in the Late Triassic, renewed inundation, from the late Early Jurassic to the early Middle Jurassic, brought a regime of shallow to open marine and lagoon sedimentation over northwestern, western and southern peninsular Thailand, in the eastern part of Sundaland bordering the Mesotethys to the west. © 2010 International Association for Gondwana Research.


Suraprasit K.,CNRS Institute of Paleoprimatology, Human Paleontoly: Evolution and Paleoenvironments | Suraprasit K.,Chulalongkorn University | Jaeger J.-J.,CNRS Institute of Paleoprimatology, Human Paleontoly: Evolution and Paleoenvironments | Chaimanee Y.,CNRS Institute of Paleoprimatology, Human Paleontoly: Evolution and Paleoenvironments | And 5 more authors.
Quaternary International | Year: 2015

The locality of Khok Sung, Nakhon Ratchasima province, which corresponds to an ancient river terrace, has yielded the richest Pleistocene fauna of Thailand with a thousand of fossil vertebrate remains. This fauna has been previously dated between the Early Pleistocene and the Middle Pleistocene. We describe here a nearly complete hyaenid skull and associated mandible identified as belonging to spotted hyaena Crocuta crocuta ultima. The spotted hyaena C. c. ultima, which extended its maximum latitudinal distribution from northern China to Peninsular Thailand, is a characteristic component of Southeast Asian Middle Pleistocene faunas. These new biochronological data, coupled with a magnetostratigraphic study of the lithological section, provide a powerful multiproxy approach for the dating of Khok Sung fauna, pinpointing rather a late Middle Pleistocene age than the Early Pleistocene. In addition, the occurrence in the Khok Sung section of a short reverse excursion of the magnetic field within the Brunhes normal Chron can be tentatively identified as corresponding either to the "Iceland Basin" (188ka) or to the "Pringle Falls" (213ka) excursion, suggesting an even more precise dating of the locality. According to the presence of a spotted hyaena, the Khok Sung fauna may illustrate an open canopy habitat in a floodplain with abundant and diversified herbivores, close to the main river channel. This interpretation contrasts with the paleobotanical data which indicate wet and dry tropical forests and may instead describe the surrounding upland vegetation. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and INQUA.


Suraprasit K.,CNRS Institute of Paleoprimatology, Human Paleontoly: Evolution and Paleoenvironments | Suraprasit K.,Chulalongkorn University | Jaeger J.-J.,CNRS Institute of Paleoprimatology, Human Paleontoly: Evolution and Paleoenvironments | Chaimanee Y.,CNRS Institute of Paleoprimatology, Human Paleontoly: Evolution and Paleoenvironments | And 4 more authors.
ZooKeys | Year: 2016

The fluviatile terrace deposits of Khok Sung, Nakhon Ratchasima province, have yielded more than one thousand fossils, making this the richest Pleistocene vertebrate fauna of Thailand. The excellent preservation of the specimens allows precise characterization of the faunal composition. The mammalian fauna consists of fifteen species in thirteen genera, including a primate, a canid, a hyaenid, proboscideans, rhinoceroses, a suid, cervids, and bovids. Most species correspond to living taxa but globally (Stegodon cf. orientalis) and locally (Crocuta crocuta ultima, Rhinoceros unicornis, Sus barbatus, and Axis axis) extinct taxa were also present. The identification of Axis axis in Khok Sung, a chital currently restricted to the Indian Subcontinent, represents the first record of the species in Southeast Asia. Three reptilian taxa: Crocodylus cf. siamensis, Python sp., and Varanus sp., are also identified. Faunal correlations with other Southeast Asian sites suggest a late Middle to early Late Pleistocene age for the Khok Sung assemblage. However, the Khok Sung mammalian fauna is most similar to that of Thum Wiman Nakin, dated to older than 169 ka. The Khok Sung large mammal assemblage mostly comprises mainland Southeast Asian taxa that migrated to Java during the latest Middle Pleistocene, supporting the hypothesis that Thailand was a biogeographic pathway for the Sino-Malayan migration event from South China to Java. © 2016, Pensoft Publishers. All rights reserved.


PubMed | CNRS Institute of Paleoprimatology, Human Paleontoly: Evolution and Paleoenvironments, Chulalongkorn University and Rama VI Road
Type: | Journal: ZooKeys | Year: 2016

The fluviatile terrace deposits of Khok Sung, Nakhon Ratchasima province, have yielded more than one thousand fossils, making this the richest Pleistocene vertebrate fauna of Thailand. The excellent preservation of the specimens allows precise characterization of the faunal composition. The mammalian fauna consists of fifteen species in thirteen genera, including a primate, a canid, a hyaenid, proboscideans, rhinoceroses, a suid, cervids, and bovids. Most species correspond to living taxa but globally (Stegodon cf. orientalis) and locally (Crocuta crocuta ultima, Rhinoceros unicornis, Sus barbatus, and Axis axis) extinct taxa were also present. The identification of Axis axis in Khok Sung, a chital currently restricted to the Indian Subcontinent, represents the first record of the species in Southeast Asia. Three reptilian taxa: Crocodylus cf. siamensis, Python sp., and Varanus sp., are also identified. Faunal correlations with other Southeast Asian sites suggest a late Middle to early Late Pleistocene age for the Khok Sung assemblage. However, the Khok Sung mammalian fauna is most similar to that of Thum Wiman Nakin, dated to older than 169 ka. The Khok Sung large mammal assemblage mostly comprises mainland Southeast Asian taxa that migrated to Java during the latest Middle Pleistocene, supporting the hypothesis that Thailand was a biogeographic pathway for the Sino-Malayan migration event from South China to Java.


Orliac M.,Montpellier University | Guy F.,CNRS Institute of Paleoprimatology, Human Paleontoly: Evolution and Paleoenvironments | Chaimanee Y.,Rama VI Road | Jaeger J.-J.,CNRS Institute of Paleoprimatology, Human Paleontoly: Evolution and Paleoenvironments | Ducrocq S.,CNRS Institute of Paleoprimatology, Human Paleontoly: Evolution and Paleoenvironments
Palaeontology | Year: 2011

We report here additional remains referred to Egatochoerus jaegeri from the late Eocene locality of Ban Mark in the Krabi basin, Thailand. The new material described, comprising upper and lower cheek teeth, deciduous premolars and partial cranial remains, makes E. jaegeri the best-documented Eocene representative of Old World Suoidea at present. Detailed study and comparison of their cheek teeth structure reveal a homogeneity of the molar crest and groove patterns of Old World and New World Palaeogene suoids. © The Palaeontological Association.

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