Ralph H Johnson Veterans Administration Hospital

Charleston, United States

Ralph H Johnson Veterans Administration Hospital

Charleston, United States

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Salas A.,Ralph H Johnson Veterans Administration Hospital | Ponnusamy S.,Ralph H Johnson Veterans Administration Hospital | Senkal C.E.,Ralph H Johnson Veterans Administration Hospital | Meyers-Needham M.,Ralph H Johnson Veterans Administration Hospital | And 19 more authors.
Blood | Year: 2011

The mechanisms by which sphingosine kinase-1 (SK-1)/sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) activation contributes to imatinib resistance in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) are unknown. We show herein that increased SK-1/S1P enhances Bcr-Abl1 protein stability, through inhibition of its proteasomal degradation in imatinib-resistant K562/IMA-3 and LAMA-4/IMA human CML cells. In fact, Bcr-Abl1 stability was enhanced by ectopic SK-1 expression. Conversely, siRNA-mediated SK-1 knockdown in K562/IMA-3 cells, or its genetic loss in SK-1-/- MEFs, significantly reduced Bcr-Abl1 stability. Regulation of Bcr-Abl1 by SK-1/S1P was dependent on S1P receptor 2 (S1P2) signaling, which prevented Bcr-Abl1 dephosphorylation, and degradation via inhibition of PP2A. Molecular or pharmacologic interference with SK-1/S1P2 restored PP2A-dependent Bcr-Abl1 dephosphorylation, and enhanced imatinib- or nilotinib-induced growth inhibition in primary CD34+ mononuclear cells obtained from chronic phase and blast crisis CML patients, K562/IMA-3 or LAMA4/IMA cells, and 32Dcl3 murine progenitor cells, expressing the wild-type or mutant (Y253H or T315I) Bcr-Abl1 in situ. Accordingly, impaired SK-1/S1P2 signaling enhanced the growth-inhibitory effects of nilotinib against 32D/T315I-Bcr-Abl1-derived mouse allografts. Since SK-1/S1P/S1P2 signaling regulates Bcr-Abl1 stability via modulation of PP2A, inhibition of SK-1/S1P2 axis represents a novel approach to target wild-type- or mutant-Bcr-Abl1 thereby overcoming drug resistance. © 2011 by The American Society of Hematology.


Xu R.,State University of New York at Stony Brook | Wang K.,State University of New York at Stony Brook | Mileva I.,State University of New York at Stony Brook | Hannun Y.A.,State University of New York at Stony Brook | And 3 more authors.
Oncotarget | Year: 2016

Human cells respond to DNA damage by elevating sphingosine, a bioactive sphingolipid that induces programmed cell death (PCD) in response to various forms of stress, but its regulation and role in the DNA damage response remain obscure. Herein we demonstrate that DNA damage increases sphingosine levels in tumor cells by upregulating alkaline ceramidase 2 (ACER2) and that the upregulation of the ACER2/sphingosine pathway induces PCD in response to DNA damage by increasing the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Treatment with the DNA damaging agent doxorubicin increased both ACER2 expression and sphingosine levels in HCT116 cells in a dose-dependent manner. ACER2 overexpression increased sphingosine in HeLa cells whereas knocking down ACER2 inhibited the doxorubicin-induced increase in sphingosine in HCT116 cells, suggesting that DNA damage elevates sphingosine by upregulating ACER2. Knocking down ACER2 inhibited an increase in the apoptotic and necrotic cell population and the cleavage of poly ADP ribose polymerase (PARP) in HCT116 cells in response to doxorubicin as well as doxorubicininduced release of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) from these cells. Similar to treatment with doxorubicin, ACER2 overexpression induced an increase in the apoptotic and necrotic cell population and PARP cleavage in HeLa cells and LDH release from cells, suggesting that ACER2 upregulation mediates PCD in response to DNA damage through sphingosine. Mechanistic studies demonstrated that the upregulation of the ACER2/sphingosine pathway induces PCD by increasing ROS levels. Taken together, these results suggest that the ACER2/sphingosine pathway mediates PCD in response to DNA damage through ROS production.


Mao Z.,Medical University of South Carolina | Sun W.,Medical University of South Carolina | Xu R.,Medical University of South Carolina | Novgorodov S.,Medical University of South Carolina | And 6 more authors.
Journal of Biological Chemistry | Year: 2010

Increased generation of dihydrosphingosine (DHS), a bioactive sphingolipid, has been implicated in the cytotoxicity of the synthetic retinoid N-(4-hydroxyphenyl)retinamide (4-HPR) in tumor cells. However, how 4-HPR increases DHS remains unclear. Here we demonstrate that 4-HPR increases the expression of ACER2, which catalyzes the hydrolysis of dihydroceramides to generate DHS, and that ACER2 up-regulation plays a key role in mediating the 4-HPR-induced generation of DHS as well as the cytotoxicity of 4-HPR in tumor cells. Treatment with 4-HPR induced the accumulation of dihydroceramides (DHCs) in tumor cells by inhibiting dihydroceramide desaturase (DES) activity, which catalyzes the conversion of DHCs to ceramides. Treatment with 4-HPR also increased ACER2 expression through a retinoic acid receptor-independent and caspase-dependent manner. Overexpression of ACER2 augmented the 4-HPR-induced generation of DHS as well as 4-HPR cytotoxicity, and 4-HPR-induced death in tumor cells, whereas knocking down ACER2 had the opposite effects. ACER2 overexpression, along with treatment with GT11, another DES inhibitor, markedly increased cellular DHS, leading to tumor cell death, whereas ACER2 overexpression or GT11 treatment alone failed to do so, suggesting that both ACER2 up-regulation and DES inhibition are necessary and sufficient to mediate 4-HPR-induced DHS accumulation, cytotoxicity, and death in tumor cells. Taken together, these results suggest that up-regulation of the ACER2/DHS pathway mediates the cytotoxicity of 4-HPR in tumor cells and that up-regulating or activating ACER2 may improve the anti-cancer activity of 4-HRR and other DHC-inducing agents.


Schuyler D.,Ralph H Johnson Veterans Administration Hospital
Primary Care Companion to the Journal of Clinical Psychiatry | Year: 2014

Through this column, we hope that practitioners in general medical settings will gain a more complete knowledge of the many patients who are likely to benefit from brief psychotherapeutic interventions. A close working relationship between primary care and psychiatry can serve to enhance patient outcome. © 2014 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.


Sharpton J.,Geriatric Unit | Schuyler D.,Ralph H Johnson Veterans Administration Hospital
Primary Care Companion to the Journal of Clinical Psychiatry | Year: 2012

Each psychotherapy intervention served a major relationship function for Mr A; each encouraged problem-solving and worked hard to not be disputatious. Each emphasized the many ways in which he had successfully adapted to his new environment and noted how a former loner had managed to make multiple new relationships and fulfilled his need to have a productive existence. The act of being present is an important aspect of psychotherapy. Being silent may be uncomfortable for some, but sometimes its positive effect is like no other. Mr A is a good example of this. He does not always want us to explain things to him or to apprise him of facts related to realistic goals. He feels that he has had significant losses, and he is aware that he is living out the end of his life. He sometimes just wants to be heard. We must remember that what he may really want is for us to be quietly and unconditionally present. © 2012 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

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