Kent, WA, United States
Kent, WA, United States
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Connelly M.A.,Raleigh America | Wolak-Dinsmore J.,Raleigh America | Dullaart R.P.F.,University of Groningen
Metabolic Syndrome and Related Disorders | Year: 2017

Background: Branched chain amino acids (BCAA) may be involved in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance and are associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) development. Adipokines such as leptin and adiponectin influence insulin resistance and reflect adipocyte dysfunction. We examined the extent to which the association of BCAA with insulin resistance is attributable to altered leptin and adiponectin levels in individuals with varying degrees of glucose tolerance. Methods: BCAA were measured by nuclear magnetic resonance, whereas leptin and adiponectin were measured by immunoassay, in subjects with normal fasting glucose (n = 30), impaired fasting glucose (n = 25), and T2DM (n = 15). Insulin resistance was estimated by homeostasis model assessment (HOMAir). Results: BCAA were higher in men than in women (P < 0.001) and tended to be higher in T2DM subjects (P = 0.10) compared to subjects with normal or impaired fasting glucose. In univariate regression analysis, BCAA were correlated with HOMAir (r = 0.46; P < 0.001) and inversely with adiponectin (r =-0.53; P < 0.001) but not with leptin (r =-0.08; P > 0.05). Multivariable linear regression analysis, adjusting for age, sex, T2DM, and body mass index (BMI), demonstrated that BCAA were positively associated with HOMAir (β = 0.242, P = 0.023). When BCAA, leptin, and adiponectin were included together, the positive relationship of HOMAir with BCAA (β = 0.275, P = 0.012) remained significant. Conclusions: Insulin resistance was associated with BCAA. This association remained after adjusting for age, sex, T2DM, BMI, as well as leptin and adiponectin. It is unlikely that the relationship of insulin resistance with BCAA is to a major extent attributable to effects of leptin and adiponectin. © Copyright 2017, Mary Ann Liebert, Inc. 2017.


Le K.,Raleigh America
AATCC Review | Year: 2017

Apparel brands and retailers are investigating the virtual prototyping of garments and other sewn products using 3D Computer Aided Design (CAD) software. The industry sees this technology adding value in a variety of ways, depending on the needs of the individual organization. However, the one vital element required is a realistic 3D representation that can extend to other areas of product development and decision-making. Accurately representing fabric digitally has opened up a whole new world to product designers and their team members tasked with speeding product development.


The drive to develop new applications for wearable technology continues to bring together multidisciplinary groups of people who are fusing existing technologies with newly developed ones. Monitoring of health data, such as temperature, heart rate, and muscle activity are some of the more useful applications of this genre of devices, but there are many possibilities to capture data. The key is being able as to obtain it accurately and decipher the data into useful feedback. As new problem solvers come onto the wearables scene, there are more examples of sensors being integrated into sewn products, which brings its own set of design challenges. Individuals involved in research, product development, and manufacturing offered some insights surrounding integrating sensors into wearable devices.


Cohen S.M.,University of Nebraska Medical Center | Gordon E.B.,Elliot Gordon Consulting LLC | Singh P.,Raleigh America | Arce G.T.,Arce Consulting | Nyska A.,Toxicologic Pathology Consultant
Critical Reviews in Toxicology | Year: 2010

A framework has been evolving for evaluation of mode of action (MOA) of rodent toxicity and carcinogenicity findings and their relevance to humans. Folpet produces duodenal glandular tumors in mice, but is not carcinogenic in rats. A wealth of information is available regarding folpet's mode of action, providing an excellent example of how this tumor can be evaluated using this framework. Folpet reacts with thiol groups, and is rapidly hydrolyzed at pH 7. Both reactions produce thiophosgene that reacts with thiols and other functional groups. Folpet is not genotoxic in vivo. At sufficiently high, prolonged dietary doses, folpet irritates the mouse duodenum, resulting in cytotoxicity with consequent regenerative proliferation and ultimately tumor development. Forestomach lesions secondary to cytotoxicity are also induced. Dogs have stomachs similar to humans and show no evidence of gastrointestinal toxicity or tumor formation at exposure levels at least as high as rodents. The data support a MOA in mice involving cytotoxicity and regenerative proliferation. Based on MOA analysis and assessment of human relevance, folpet, like captan, another trichloromethylthio-related fungicide with similar toxic and carcinogenic effects, is not likely to be a human carcinogen at dose levels that do not cause cytotoxicity and regenerative proliferation. © 2010 Informa UK Ltd.


Arce G.T.,Arce Consulting | Gordon E.B.,Elliot Gordon Consulting LLC | Cohen S.M.,University of Nebraska Medical Center | Singh P.,Raleigh America
Critical Reviews in Toxicology | Year: 2010

Folpet and captan are fungicides whose genotoxicity depends on their chemical reaction with thiols. Multiple mutagenicity tests have been conducted on these compounds due to their positive activity in vitro and their association with gastrointestinal tumors in mice. A review of the collective data shows that these compounds have in vitro mutagenic activity but are not genotoxic in vivo. This dichotomy is primarily due to the rapid degradation of folpet and captan in the presence of thiol-rich matrices typically found in vivo. Genotoxicity has not been found in the duodenum, the mouse tumor target tissue. It is concluded that folpet like captan presents an unlikely risk of genotoxic effects in humans. © 2010 Informa UK Ltd.


Trademark
Raleigh America | Date: 2012-08-14

Bicycles.


Trademark
Raleigh America | Date: 2012-01-17

Bicycles.


Trademark
Raleigh America | Date: 2011-10-25

Bicycles.


Trademark
Raleigh America | Date: 2011-10-25

Bicycles.


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