Radiation Oncology Queensland

Toowoomba, Australia

Radiation Oncology Queensland

Toowoomba, Australia
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Hayden A.J.,Westmead Cancer Care Center | Martin J.M.,Radiation Oncology Queensland | Kneebone A.B.,Northern Sydney Cancer Center | Lehman M.,Princess Alexandra Hospital | And 4 more authors.
Journal of Medical Imaging and Radiation Oncology | Year: 2010

Summary: External beam radiotherapy for prostate cancer has undergone substantial technological and clinical advances in the recent years. The Australian & New Zealand Faculty of Radiation Oncology Genito-Urinary Group undertook a process to develop consensus clinical practice guidelines for external beam radiotherapy for prostate carcinoma delivered with curative intent, aiming to provide guidance for clinicians on the appropriate integration of clinical evidence and newer technologies. Draft guidelines were presented and discussed at a consensus workshop in May 2009 attended by radiation oncologists, radiation therapists and medical physicists. Amended guidelines were distributed to radiation oncologists in Australia, New Zealand and Singapore for comment, and modifications were incorporated where appropriate. Evidence based recommendations for risk stratification, the role of image-guided and intensity-modulated radiation therapy, prescribed dose, simulation and treatment planning, the role and duration of neo-adjuvant/adjuvant androgen deprivation therapy and outcome reporting are presented. Central to the guidelines is the recommendation that image-guided radiation therapy should be used when definitive external beam radiotherapy for prostate cancer is prescribed. The consensus guidelines provide a co-operatively developed, evidence-based framework for contemporary treatment of prostate cancer with external beam radiotherapy. © 2010 The Authors. Journal of Medical Imaging and Radiation Oncology © 2010 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.


Ratnayake G.,Royal Brisbane and Womens Hospital | Martin J.,University of Newcastle | Plank A.,Oncology Research Australia | Wong W.,Radiation Oncology Queensland
Journal of Medical Imaging and Radiation Oncology | Year: 2014

Introduction Both intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) have been shown to independently reduce late rectal toxicity for men with prostate cancer (PC) treated with radiotherapy. We explore whether IMRT offers further reductions in late rectal toxicity for men already being managed with IGRT and compare this with more gradual changes over time. Methods Between 2007 and 2009, 103 patients with PC were treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT n = 52) or IMRT (n = 51) with doses of 74-78 Gy at 2 Gy per fraction. All men had daily IGRT using intra-prostatic gold fiducials. The primary endpoint was incidence of grade ≥2 late rectal toxicity as graded by the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group scale. Results The relative risk of late grade ≥2 rectal toxicity in patients treated with IMRT was 68% less than seen with image-guided 3D-CRT at 36 months post-treatment (7% versus 22%; hazard ratio = 0.32, P = 0.03). IMRT remained a significant protective factor in a multivariate analysis. A discriminant analysis showed that the relative volume of rectal wall exposed to doses over 50 Gy was most strongly associated with late rectal toxicity. Controlling for duration of follow-up, a later year of treatment was the strongest clinical predictor of late rectal toxicity in multivariate modelling (P = 0.03). Conclusion For men with PC managed to doses of 74-78 Gy with IGRT, IMRT leads to reduced rectal toxicity compared with 3D-CRT. Incremental improvements in treatment delivery over time also appear to have an independently strong beneficial effect. © 2014 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.


Healy B.,Radiation Oncology Queensland | Frantzis J.,Radiation Oncology Queensland | Murry R.,Radiation Oncology Queensland | Martin J.,Radiation Oncology Queensland | And 3 more authors.
Australasian Physical and Engineering Sciences in Medicine | Year: 2011

A methodology has been developed for a dosimetry inter-comparison of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) delivery in Australasia. The inter-comparison is part of site credentialing for those sites participating in the prostate fractionated irradiation trial (PROFIT) for intermediate-risk prostate patients developed by the Ontario Clinical Oncology Group and coordinated in Australasia by the Trans Tasman Radiation Oncology Group. Features of the dosimetry inter-comparison design included the use of a dedicated pelvic anthropomorphic phantom, the use of a single CT data set of the phantom including contours and the use of radiochromic film as a dosimeter. Action levels for agreement between measured dose and treatment planning system dose have been proposed based on measurement uncertainty and international experience. A trial run of the dosimetry procedure at the reference centre gave results within the predefined action levels. © 2011 Australasian College of Physical Scientists and Engineers in Medicine.


Biggs S.,Riverina Cancer Care Center | Sobolewski M.,Riverina Cancer Care Center | Murry R.,Radiation Oncology Queensland | Kenny J.,Epworth HealthCare
Physica Medica | Year: 2015

There are many methods available to predict electron output factors; however, many centres still measure the factors for each irregular electron field. Creating an electron output factor prediction model that approaches measurement accuracy - but uses already available data and is simple to implement - would be advantageous in the clinical setting. This work presents an empirical spline model for output factor prediction that requires only the measured factors for arbitrary insert shapes. Equivalent ellipses of the insert shapes are determined and then parameterised by width and ratio of perimeter to area. This takes into account changes in lateral scatter, bremsstrahlung produced in the insert material, and scatter from the edge of the insert. Agreement between prediction and measurement for the 12 MeV validation data had an uncertainty of 0.4% (1SD). The maximum recorded deviation between measurement and prediction over the range of energies was 1.0%. The validation methodology showed that one may expect an approximate uncertainty of 0.5% (1SD) when as little as eight data points are used. The level of accuracy combined with the ease with which this model can be generated demonstrates its suitability for clinical use. Implementation of this method is freely available for download at https://github.com/SimonBiggs/electronfactors. © 2015 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica.


Gorayski P.,Radiation Oncology Queensland | Gorayski P.,University of Queensland | Pinkham M.B.,University of Queensland | Pinkham M.B.,Princess Alexandra Hospital | And 2 more authors.
Australian Family Physician | Year: 2015

Background One in five Australian men are diagnosed with prostate cancer. External beam radiation therapy (EBRT) is an effective treatment for men suitable for definitive therapy. Objectives This article outlines the processes involved in EBRT for prostate cancer, with particular emphasis on recent technological advances that have had a positive impact on patient outcomes. The patient's experience is explained and comparisons are made with surgery. Discussion Patients diagnosed with localised prostate cancer may have multiple treatment options. General practitioners have an important role in helping patients navigate their way through the information needed to make this decision. Radiotherapy technologies, including image guidance, intensitymodulated radiation therapy and stereotactic (ablative) radiation therapy are discussed in this article. © The Royal Australian College of General practitioners 2015.


Nicholls L.,Radiation Oncology Queensland | Nicholls L.,University of Queensland | Gorayski P.,Radiation Oncology Queensland | Harvey J.,University of Queensland | Harvey J.,Princess Alexandra Hospital
Case Reports in Oncology | Year: 2015

Introduction: Osteoradionecrosis (ORN) of the chest wall is a rare complication after whole-breast radiotherapy (RT). Herein, we report a case of ORN involving the underlying ribs following adjuvant whole-breast RT using standard fractionation and conduct a review of the literature. Case Report: A previously well 43-year-old female with right-sided, early-stage, node-negative breast cancer was treated with breast-conserving surgery. She subsequently underwent adjuvant whole-breast RT receiving 50 Gy in 25 fractions over 5 weeks using standard tangential photon fields with 6 MV photons followed by an electron boost of 10 Gy in 5 fractions according to International Commission on Radiation Units (ICRU) requirements. Eleven months after RT, the patient developed right lateral chest wall pain, with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrating two fractures involving the underlying right fifth and sixth ribs associated with fatty marrow changes in the second to sixth ribs, thus raising the possibility of ORN. Treatments including hyperbaric oxygen, pentoxifylline and vitamin E were used with symptomatic improvements. There was demonstrable resolution on follow-up MRI at 2.5 years. Conclusion: The incidence of ORN utilising modern RT techniques and standard fractionation is rare. Numerous treatments are available, with variable response rates. Emerging evidence of predictive gene profiling to estimate the risk of radiation sensitivity may assist in individualising preventative strategies to mitigate the risk of ORN. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.


Middleton M.,Radiation Oncology Queensland | Nguyen H.,Radiation Oncology Queensland | Plank A.,Oncology Research Australia | Jones M.,Radiation Oncology Queensland | And 2 more authors.
Radiography | Year: 2014

Aims: Daily IGRT using kV imaging has allowed an enhanced field of view for head and neck IMRT patients. This has allowed the treating radiation therapists to note set-up error beyond traditional spatial or translational and include angular error. This study compares two stabilisation methods for head and neck IGRT and compares spatial and angular error between them. Methods and materials: 9 patients were assessed using a CIVCO S-board and generic Silverman head rest and another 9 patients were assessed using a CIVCO S-board with a CIVCO S-type vac-fix bag. Daily IGRT was undertaken and pre-intervention set-up error collected. This was inclusive of error in the lateral, longitudinal and vertical plans and angular discrepancy between cervical spine 1 and cervical spine 7. Results: The vac-fix solution provided a significant reduction in the systematic yaw position (anterior-posterior) (p=0.04). It also reduced the mean resultant systematic angular error significantly (p=0.01). The lateral systematic spatial error was decreased significantly by the vac-fix (p=0.03) whilst the longitudinal and vertical systematic errors were not. The differences in random error between the two stabilisation solutions were not significant. Conclusion: kV IGRT has allowed treating radiation therapists to note angular error in the head and neck region. This can be difficult to deal with using only IGRT. Stabilisation solutions in the head and neck region must be able to manage both spatial and angular set-up error. The vac-fix solution has improved the management of angular error for head and neck IMRT patients. © 2013 The College of Radiographers.


PubMed | Radiation Oncology Queensland
Type: Clinical Trial | Journal: Medical physics | Year: 2013

A multi-institution dosimetry intercomparison has been undertaken of prostate intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) delivery. The dosimetry intercomparison was incorporated into the quality assurance for site credentialing for the Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group Prostate Fractionated Irradiation Trial 08.01 clinical trial.An anthropomorphic pelvic phantom with realistic anatomy was used along with multiplanar dosimetry tools for the assessment. Nineteen centers across Australia and New Zealand participated in the study.In comparing planned versus measured dose to the target at the isocenter within the phantom, all centers were able to achieve a total delivered dose within 3% of planned dose. In multiplanar analysis with radiochromic film using the gamma analysis method to compare delivered and planned dose, pass rates for a 5%/3 mm criterion were better than 90% for a coronal slice through the isocenter. Pass rates for an off-axis coronal slice were also better than 90% except for one instance with 84% pass rate.Strengths of the dosimetry assessment procedure included the true anthropomorphic nature of the phantom used, the involvement of an expert from the reference center in carrying out the assessment at every site, and the ability of the assessment to detect and resolve dosimetry discrepancies.


PubMed | University of Queensland and Radiation Oncology Queensland
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Case reports in oncology | Year: 2015

Osteoradionecrosis (ORN) of the chest wall is a rare complication after whole-breast radiotherapy (RT). Herein, we report a case of ORN involving the underlying ribs following adjuvant whole-breast RT using standard fractionation and conduct a review of the literature.A previously well 43-year-old female with right-sided, early-stage, node-negative breast cancer was treated with breast-conserving surgery. She subsequently underwent adjuvant whole-breast RT receiving 50 Gy in 25 fractions over 5 weeks using standard tangential photon fields with 6 MV photons followed by an electron boost of 10 Gy in 5 fractions according to International Commission on Radiation Units (ICRU) requirements. Eleven months after RT, the patient developed right lateral chest wall pain, with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrating two fractures involving the underlying right fifth and sixth ribs associated with fatty marrow changes in the second to sixth ribs, thus raising the possibility of ORN. Treatments including hyperbaric oxygen, pentoxifylline and vitamin E were used with symptomatic improvements. There was demonstrable resolution on follow-up MRI at 2.5 years.The incidence of ORN utilising modern RT techniques and standard fractionation is rare. Numerous treatments are available, with variable response rates. Emerging evidence of predictive gene profiling to estimate the risk of radiation sensitivity may assist in individualising preventative strategies to mitigate the risk of ORN.


PubMed | Epworth HealthCare, Radiation Oncology Queensland and Riverina Cancer Care Center
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Physica medica : PM : an international journal devoted to the applications of physics to medicine and biology : official journal of the Italian Association of Biomedical Physics (AIFB) | Year: 2016

There are many methods available to predict electron output factors; however, many centres still measure the factors for each irregular electron field. Creating an electron output factor prediction model that approaches measurement accuracy--but uses already available data and is simple to implement--would be advantageous in the clinical setting. This work presents an empirical spline model for output factor prediction that requires only the measured factors for arbitrary insert shapes. Equivalent ellipses of the insert shapes are determined and then parameterised by width and ratio of perimeter to area. This takes into account changes in lateral scatter, bremsstrahlung produced in the insert material, and scatter from the edge of the insert. Agreement between prediction and measurement for the 12MeV validation data had an uncertainty of 0.4% (1SD). The maximum recorded deviation between measurement and prediction over the range of energies was 1.0%. The validation methodology showed that one may expect an approximate uncertainty of 0.5% (1SD) when as little as eight data points are used. The level of accuracy combined with the ease with which this model can be generated demonstrates its suitability for clinical use. Implementation of this method is freely available for download at https://github.com/SimonBiggs/electronfactors.

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