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Charles F. Brega, Director of Fairfield and Woods P.C., has joined The Expert Network©, an invitation-only service for distinguished professionals. Mr. Brega has been chosen as a Distinguished Lawyer™ based on peer reviews and ratings, dozens of recognitions, and accomplishments achieved throughout his career. Mr. Brega outshines others in his field due to his extensive educational background, numerous awards and recognitions, and career longevity. Mr. Brega earned his bachelor's degree with distinction in 1954 from The Citadel Military Academy before obtaining his Juris Doctor from the University of Colorado Law School. Mr. Brega is a Martindale-Hubbell® AV® Preeminent™ Rated attorney whose outstanding representation has earned him distinction as a Top 100 Trial Lawyer by The National Trial Lawyers, Top 10 Attorney by the National Academy of Personal Injury Attorneys, and 10 Best in Client Satisfaction by the American Institute of Personal Injury Attorneys, among many others. With nearly 60 years dedicated to law, Mr. Brega brings a wealth of knowledge to his industry and, in particular, to his areas of specialization, the fields of estate, family, personal injury, and intellectual property law. When asked about his decision to pursue a career in law, Mr. Brega said: "We lived in a tiny town, and both my dad and grandad were attorneys. I always saw them doing it, and that’s what I always wanted to be." Today, Mr. Brega operates his practice under a passionate relationship-driven approach to law, which considers a client to be simply 'a friend with a problem.' With more than half a century of litigation experience behind him, Mr. Brega has tried over 400 civil and criminal cases in both state and federal courts, and before arbitration panels. His experience has earned him a wealth of industry knowledge, and he is highly skilled in a range of litigation matters including Estate and Trusts, Business and Commercial, Family Law, Intellectual Property, Real Estate, Personal Injury, Securities, Arbitration, and Regulatory Defense. In addition, he has a wealth of experience in Security and Criminal Law, with hundreds of cases related to experience and over a dozen murder trials under his belt. As a thought-leader in his field, Mr. Brega has a unique vantage point from which to track developments in the industry. Commenting on the growing prominence of cases that are resolved through settlement rather than trial, he noted: "In my opinion, we are getting fewer and fewer people who are real trial lawyers. Most people today are looking to settle out of court as much as possible because litigation has become so expensive for the average person." With such a position of prominence in his industry, Mr. Brega is deeply involved in his professional community. He has previously held positions as the President of the Colorado Lawyers Association and on the Board of Governers for the American Trial Lawyers Association. Today, he is a respected member of the International Academy of Trial Lawyers, as well as the International Society of Barristers. Over the course of his career, Mr. Brega has been considered nationally as one of the top three speakers in his industry and continues to teach trial strategy, negotiation techniques, and settlement skills both across the country and internationally. For more information, visit Mr. Brega's profile on The Expert Network© here: https://expertnetwork.co/members/charles-f-brega/1dfce0b81e3fe980 The Expert Network© has written this news release with approval and/or contributions from Charles F. Brega. The Expert Network© is an invitation-only reputation management service that is dedicated to helping professionals stand out, network, and gain a competitive edge. The Expert Network© selects a limited number of professionals based on their individual recognitions and history of personal excellence.


News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

To promote health and wellbeing in an increasingly stressful world, The American Meditation Institute (AMI) in Averill Park, New York will host its first annual Health & Happiness Conference on Saturday, April 29, 2017 from 10am – 4:00pm at the Hindu Cultural Center in Albany, New York. Led by internationally acclaimed mind/body medicine pioneer Bernie Siegel, MD and AMI founder Leonard Perlmutter, the conference will bring together a faculty of distinguished physicians and meditation researchers to present practical tools to enhance health, creativity, well-being, happiness and success. “Coping with daily life—family, work, managing emotions—is incredibly challenging in today’s fast-paced, complex, stressful world,” said Leonard Perlmutter. “AMI’s Health & Happiness Conference will give participants from all walks of life practical ideas on how to transform stress and put proven techniques immediately into action to enhance their lives.” Participants have the opportunity to choose how they will spend the day. Beginner sessions will include Meditation 101, Breath as Medicine, Relieving Stress, and Food as Medicine. Advanced sessions will cover DNA is Not Destiny, Functions of the Mind, and Meditation & The Brain. “The Health & Happiness Conference will offer something for everyone, no matter your experience level,” said Leonard Perlmutter. “By allow participants to customize their day, they will maximize their experience and emerge from the training inspired and ready to create a happier, healthier, more meaningful life.” To nourish body and soul, participants will enjoy easy-gentle yoga and a delicious gourmet vegetarian lunch. In the afternoon, renowned keynote speaker Bernie Siegel will share his thoughts on The Healing Power of Love and Leonard Perlmutter will delve deep into the topic of “Using the Mind to Heal the Body.” A lively panel discussion will cap off the day’s events. Feeling refreshed, rejuvenated and renewed, participants will emerge from the training ready to apply what they learned with these practical tools for healthy living: Leonard Perlmutter, AMI Founder “The Mind Can Heal the Body” and “Who am I?” Leonard is a noted philosopher and author of The Heart and Science of Yoga®. He is a direct disciple of Swami Rama––who, in laboratory conditions, demonstrated that blood pressure, heart rate and the autonomic nervous system can be voluntarily controlled. Leonard has presented courses at the M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, the U. S. Military Academy and The New York Times Yoga Forum with Dean Ornish MD. Bernie Siegel, MD “The Healing Power of Love” Bernie is an acclaimed mind/body medicine pioneer who has worked throughout his illustrious career to help patients heal. As an intuitive Yoga scientist and surgeon, Bernie embraces a philosophy of living and dying that stands as a beacon of clarity for today’s medical ethics and spiritual issues. Beth Netter, MD, MT “Breath as Medicine” and Panel Discussion Beth is a holistic physician and acupuncturist in Albany, NY. A graduate of the University at Buffalo’s School of Biomedical Sciences, she completed her residency in anesthesiology at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston. Beth serves as Chair of AMI’s Department of Medical Education. Mark Pettus, MD “Epigenomics/Inflammation/Allostatic Load” and Panel Discussion Mark is a board-certified internist and nephrologist currently serving as Director of Medical Education and Population Health at Berkshire Health Systems, and Clinical Associate Professor of Medicine at UMass Medical School. Mark is the author of The Savvy Patient and It’s All in Your Head. Susan Lord, MD “Food as Medicine” and Panel Discussion Susan graduated from Case Western Reserve School of Medicine and is in private practice in Great Barrington, MA focusing on prevention and treatment through mindful living and lifestyle changes. She served as Director for the Food as Medicine program at the Center for Mind/Body Medicine 1996-2007. Anthony Santilli, MD “Relieving Physician Burnout” and Panel Discussion Tony received his medical degree from the University at Buffalo, having completed his fellowship at Weill Cornell University and his post graduate training at Brown University. He is board-certified in Pulmonary and Critical Care medicine and practices in Schenectady and Amsterdam NY. Prashant Kaushik, MD Panel Discussion Prashant received a Bachelors of Medicine & Surgery degree from the All India Institute of Medical Services. A board-certified Rheumatologist, Prashant serves as Lead Rheumatologist at the Albany VA Medical Center, Associate Professor, Dept. of Internal Medicine, Albany Medical College. Sara Lazar, PhD “Neuroplasticity: The Effect of Meditation” and Panel Discussion Sara is an instructor in the Department of Psychiatry at Harvard Medical School, and an Associate Researcher in the Psychiatry Department at Mass. General Hospital. A leading neuroscientist in the field, her team was the first to show how meditation and yoga influence brain structure and human behavior. Mary Helen Holloway, AMI-MT “Meditation 101” and Panel Discussion Mary is a graduate of Meditational Therapist Certification Program. Drawing upon an intuitive understanding of mind/body medicine, she currently teaches all levels of meditation courses, actively lectures to civic, medical and religious organizations, serves as Director of AMI’s Yoga of Medicine Program. Jenness Cortez Perlmutter Panel Discussion Jenness has studied Yoga Science and practiced meditation since 1977. She is the co-founder and faculty member of AMI and a direct disciple of Swami Rama of the Himalayas. She graduated from the Herron School of Art, and is a world-renowned artist. The American Meditation Institute is a 501(c)3 non-profit educational organization devoted to the teaching and practice of Yoga Science, AMI meditation and its allied disciplines as mind/body medicine. In its holistic approach to wellness, AMI combines the healing arts of the East with the practicality of modern Western science. The American Meditation Institute offers a wide variety of classes, retreats, and teacher training programs. AMI also publishes Transformation a bi-monthly journal of meditation as holistic mind/body medicine. Call (518) 674-8714 for a mail or email subscription.


HOUSTON--(BUSINESS WIRE)--APQC, the benchmarking and best practices research firm, mourns the death of founder and executive chairman, Dr. C. Jackson “Jack” Grayson. He passed away peacefully on May 4th at his home in Houston, Texas, at the age of 93. Grayson spent his entire professional career applying quality thinking and methods to help improve organizations and society. With a zeal for life and quest for adventure, “Mr. Charisma” always kept his family and colleagues on their toes. He started setting the bar high in high school when he danced with Vivien Leigh at the gala premiere of Gone with the Wind in Atlanta while a student at Georgia Military Academy. Keen on exploring the world and all its wonder, Grayson completed his seven-continent quest in 2003 at age 80, with an Antarctica trip, and celebrated his birthday with skydives at age 75 and 90. “APQC has lost a tireless champion, a visionary genius, and an inspiring mentor. Jack’s early and sustained efforts to help companies in business, government, and education improve productivity and quality have enhanced the competitiveness of countless organizations for almost five decades,” said Lisa Higgins, APQC president and chief operating officer. “We’ll especially miss his passion, wit, and enthusiasm for both work and life.” Grayson rose to public prominence in 1971 when he served as chairman of the U.S. Price Commission under President Nixon. Though the price controls were widely unpopular, he earned national recognition from the press, business leaders, and labor for his transparent and fair administration and later for his work to remove the controls. During this period Grayson came to understand that productivity growth in America was falling and sounded the alarm about our sagging productivity, quality, and competiveness. In 1977 he made an unprecedented commitment to halting that decline when he founded the American Productivity & Quality Center (APQC), originally known as the American Productivity Center. Based in Houston, the organization initially offered productivity improvement training courses, established common performance measures, and conducted the first White House Conference on Productivity. At the same time, he sought to create a physical venue to connect mind, body, and spirit and co-founded the Houstonian Hotel, Club & Spa in Houston, Texas. “I vowed when I left government, I would do something to wake up the nation to the importance of productivity, but more importantly, to help improve it,” said Grayson in an interview. APQC was his answer to a dangerous economy—it was an initiative that would help improve American competitiveness. In the mid-1980s he recommended the creation of a national quality medal, which subsequently became the Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award. APQC and the American Society for Quality (ASQ) jointly administered the award in its first three years. In 1991 he and staff at APQC launched the International Benchmarking Clearinghouse to help organizations identify and learn from best practices and in 1993, the Process Classification Framework® (PCF), a business taxonomy now regarded as the most widely-used worldwide for process improvement. Later he and his team helped launch and usher in the concept of knowledge management in the mid-90s. “Few, if any, individual Americans have done more during the last 20 years to shape the country’s economic future for the better,” stated BusinessWeek of Grayson in 1990. For Grayson, it was simple: the words “can’t” and “no” simply did not exist. In 1997, at the age of 74, Grayson launched and dedicated the rest of his career to the APQC Education Initiative to help schools benchmark and adopt best practices. Grayson believed many of the same productivity and quality principles and process management approaches that apply to the business world could be transferred to the academic arena, specifically the K-12 education system. He retired from APQC in September 2015, just shy of his 92nd birthday. Grayson earned his bachelor's degree from Tulane University, an MBA from the Wharton School of Business at the University of Pennsylvania, and a doctorate in business from the Harvard Business School. His academic career included professorships at Harvard, Stanford, Tulane, and Southern Methodist University (SMU) as well as business schools in France and Switzerland. He served as dean for the business schools at Tulane and at SMU, where he became known for instituting innovations in business education at both institutions. During World War II, he served four years in the U.S. Navy and fought in the South Pacific. In addition to his academic and public work, his career included being a newspaper reporter in New Orleans, an FBI special agent, a manager of a cotton farm in North Louisiana, and a member of an import-export firm. A lifelong proponent of constant learning, experimentation, and having fun, he was a single-engine airplane pilot, a racehorse owner, and world traveler, even setting foot on all seven continents. He authored many magazine and newspaper articles as well as four business books, including American Business: A Two-Minute Warning about the productivity slide against global competitors and If Only We Knew What We Know, co-authored with his wife, Dr. Carla O'Dell, about knowledge management and the internal transfer of best practices. Grayson was a CPA and a retired board member for eight major U.S. corporations. In addition to his work with President Nixon, Grayson served on two additional presidential commissions for President Carter’s Commission for a National Agenda and President Reagan’s National Productivity Advisory Committee. In 1973 he was honored as Wharton’s Man of the Year by the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania. In 2000 English research firm Teleos named him one of the 10 “Most Admired Knowledge Leaders” in North America. In 2003 the American Society for Quality (ASQ) named him as one of nine Distinguished Service Medalists. In 2006 the Cox School of Business at SMU created the C. Jackson Grayson Endowed Faculty Innovation Award for excellence and creativity in teaching and an endowed MBA scholarship in entrepreneurial studies, gifted by Bobby Lyle. In 2008 APQC and ASQ established the C. Jackson Grayson Distinguished Quality Pioneer Medal to honor individuals who have demonstrated leadership in quality areas in education, health care, public sector, and not-for-profit organizations. In 2016 he was inducted into the Hall of Fame by the Association for Manufacturing Excellence (AME). According to Grayson, of the honors bestowed on him over the years, he was most moved by the APQC-driven tributes. In 2015 APQC launched Founder’s Day, an annual celebration to honor Jack Grayson and the work of APQC. During the inaugural event, APQC renamed its amphitheater to be Grayson Hall—“dedicated to all those who come to APQC to learn, adapt, and improve their organizations and named in honor of our Founder Jack Grayson, who inspires and challenges every individual to reinvent their future every day.” In 2016 APQC introduced the Grayson Guarantee™, a defining guide for APQC and its team on how to live, work, and act with Grayson’s values at the forefront of every decision. For Grayson the benefits of productivity growth extend beyond business strategy and enhancements to the bottom line. “If you look at highly productive companies, you notice that people are happier,” he said. “They are more empowered and responsible and take pride in their work. This adds to the productivity and the well being of the people in the organization.” What worked for the individual also worked for the company and country, he believed. “Any life that is not productive is wasted. If you are not striving to continuously learn and grow, you are not leading a productive life. This is true for an individual, and it is true for a country.” A biography of Grayson's life, Freedom to Dream, Courage to Act: The First Nine Decades of C. Jackson Grayson, was released in 2014 to celebrate his 91st birthday. Grayson was born on October 8, 1923 in Fort Necessity, Louisiana. Grayson is survived by his wife Dr. Carla O’Dell, and his children, Christopher Jackson Grayson and wife Kelly; Michael Wiley Grayson and wife Siew Leng Toh; Randall Charles Grayson and wife Kerry O’Regan; and four grandchildren, Mckenna Nicole Grayson, Andrew Jackson Grayson, Clove Regan Grayson, and Annika Regan Grayson. He was preceded in death by his parents, Charles Jackson Grayson, Sr. and Daphne de Graffenreid Grayson; and his son, Daniel Jackson Grayson. A celebration of life service will be held at 11:00 AM on Friday, May 12th at Chapelwood United Methodist Church in Houston; a reception will follow in the Fellowship Hall. In lieu of flowers the family asks that contributions be made in Grayson's memory to Camp Augusta, located at 17530 Lake Vera Purdon Road, Nevada City, California 95959. For more details about Grayson’s life and his contributions to the growth of the American economy, please read his biography or share your comments about Grayson at www.apqc.org or @APQC. Editor/Reporter Note: Current and historical photography is available to support editorial needs.


News Article | April 20, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

WEST POINT, N.Y.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--The Thayer Leader Development Group at West Point (TLDG) released a 13-minute video that helps companies learn how to support veterans and their families, beyond hiring policies. As a company founded by veterans and teaching the principles of military leadership to corporate America, TLDG consistently sees a high demand from corporate executives seeking information about how to support our military and veterans. This includes helping transition from a military to civilian career, as well as honoring and supporting the military, veterans and their family through philanthropic efforts and discount programs, as a few examples. TLDG released the video to commemorate the 242nd anniversary of the start of the American Revolutionary War, on April 19, 1775, with the “shot heard round the world;” the day America’s military first started fighting for our liberty. This video distills the best practices shared by Fortune 500 executives at the Veterans Support Symposium hosted by TLDG and Nasdaq in November 2016. It recommends both simple and creative ideas for how corporations, large and small, can offer support by creating their own set of veterans initiatives, based on 13 categories of support. One of the executives at the Symposium, Roland Smith, CEO of Office Depot, said, “As we went through those 13 categories, we defined seven that we thought we could do well and would be meaningful both to our organization, veterans in our organization, and veterans that we wanted to assimilate into our organization. We put resources against them so that we can start to execute them in 2017, and then we’ll review these each year. Hopefully, as you look 3 to 5 years into the future, we’ll be a company that does a much better job of supporting our veterans.” The video includes best practices, shared by a variety of companies, including Office Depot, Virtu Financial, Wyndham Worldwide, Citi, IAP, and Ironsword. “In our experience, the greatest companies in the country honor veterans and the military. They also teach military leadership principles to their corporate executives,” said Dan Rice, President of TLDG. “We hope this video will jumpstart every CEO in the United States to adopt the ‘CEO Challenge’. This is a simple challenge to create and share their own Veterans’ Initiatives on their corporate websites. By this simple act, the needle can be moved dramatically on supporting veterans in corporate America.” This video is released on the heels of numerous initiatives by TLDG over the past two years to garner attention for veterans support, including announcing the CEO Challenge on Fox & Friends. TLDG has partnered with the Association for Talent Development (ATD) to publish a special magazine sent to 40,000 HR professionals, highlighting best practices from 16 organizations that are trailblazers in recruiting, developing, and supporting veterans and active duty military. TLDG also hosted the Opening and Closing Bells at Nasdaq on Veteran’s Day, with companies raising their hands to pledge to hire more veterans. TLDG is a premier executive leader development program, based at West Point, NY, on the grounds of the United States Military Academy. Founded in 2010 by U.S. Army veterans, TLDG has trained more than 31,500 executives and front-line leaders from over 500 companies across a variety of industries including automotive, financial services, medical, pharmaceutical, professional sports franchises, and more with customized, open enrollment, and online learning programs. Its mission is to help build leaders of character by offering leadership and ethics education grounded in the U.S. Army leadership philosophy of “Be, Know, Do” and the U.S. Military Academy values of “Duty, Honor, Country”. Learn more at www.thayerleaderdevelopment.com


News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Chris Head, who represents the 17th District in the Virginia House of Delegates, has accepted the invitation from RADM J. Scott Burhoe, the president of Fork Union Military Academy, to be this year's commencement speaker at the graduation ceremony to be held on May 27, 2017. Delegate Head is the father of Cadet Michael Head, a senior in the Class of 2017 who has attended the Academy since August 2013 when he enrolled as a freshman. Delegate Head and his wife, Betsy, live in the Roanoke area and have three children. Head is a longtime business owner, operating a franchise of Home Instead Senior Care, which provides in-home care for seniors in Roanoke and Lynchburg. He was recognized as Small Business of the Year by the Roanoke Regional Chamber of Commerce in 2009. It was his experience dealing with the growing number and complexity of state and federal regulations affecting his business that motivated him to seek elective office and work to create a better business environment in Virginia. When the incumbent from the 17th House district retired in 2009, Head ran for the nomination of the Republican party, finishing second in a primary with five candidates. When the winner of that 2009 contest chose not to seek reelection in 2011, Head was nominated for the seat as the Republican candidate and won election to the House of Delegates. Head represents parts of Roanoke, Roanoke County, and Botetourt County in Virginia's House of Delegates. He is the co-founder and Chairman of the Business Development Caucus in the House and serves on the Finance Committee, the Health, Welfare, and Institutions Committee, and the Militia, Police, and Public Safety Committee. In February 2017, Delegate Head sponsored House Resolution 380 honoring the life and service of the Academy's late Commandant of Cadets, Duane Fender. Fork Union Military Academy in Fork Union, Virginia, is a college preparatory military boarding school for young men in Grades 7 through 12 and postgraduates. Affiliated with the Baptist General Association of Virginia and open to those of all religious denominations, Fork Union was founded in 1898 and has a rich tradition promoting character, leadership, and scholarship.


News Article | May 5, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

Kim Jong Un is a “smart cookie,” President Donald Trump said recently of North Korea’s leader. “He’s 27 years old,” Trump mused. “His father dies, [he] took over a regime. So say what you want but that is not easy.” Kim, who has assassinated his internal rivals using anti-aircraft guns and chemical weapons, seeks to develop a nuclear missile that can reach the United States. These actions may provoke a “major, major conflict” with the U.S., Trump has said: “I hope he’s rational.” In my research on political leaders, I’ve found that different people have different definitions of rationality. The core question – “What is my best move?” – is often answered by a leader’s idiosyncratic beliefs, rather than by an immediately obvious logic of the situation as seen by external observers. The history of dealing with inscrutable foreign leaders is instructive: From Hitler to Saddam to Khrushchev, understanding the other is the most urgent challenge of national security decision-making for the U.S. To influence Kim’s behavior, we must ask: What is his particular vantage point? In the spring of 1943, the director of the first centralized U.S. intelligence agency, Colonel William “Wild Bill” Donovan, sought help in understanding Hitler. Donovan wanted to give President Franklin D. Roosevelt a sense of “the things that make him tick.” Donovan called Walter C. Langer, a psychoanalyst helping with the war effort, in for a meeting: “What do you make of Hitler? If Hitler is running the show, what kind of a person is he? What are his ambitions?” Langer combined the scant intelligence on Hitler with insights from Freudian psychoanalysis into a study on Hitler. He accurately predicted that Hitler would commit suicide rather than be captured by Allied forces. But his insight was largely irrelevant to the military strategy for defeating Germany. The report took so long to produce that the war was nearly over by the time it was delivered to Donovan. More recently, the former top U.N. weapons inspector Charles Duelfer and I studied what made former Iraqi president Saddam Hussein tick. For several years, Duelfer was the senior point of contact between Iraq and the U.S. After the regime fell, he produced the definitive report on its weapons programs. Looking for logic in Saddam’s decisions, we found instead a morass of idiosyncratic thinking. Most astonishing was his misreading of President George W. Bush’s June 2002 speech to the West Point Military Academy. Intending to warn Saddam that he must comply with U.N. demands or face war, Bush struck a stern tone. The “gravest danger to freedom,” he said, was “unbalanced dictators with weapons of mass destruction.” Later in the speech, Bush praised President Ronald Reagan for standing up to “the brutality of tyrants.” What Bush said and what Saddam heard were two very different things. Saddam did not see himself as unbalanced, and he knew that he did not have weapons of mass destruction. And U.S.-Iraq relations had been excellent under President Reagan, Saddam recalled. The United States had tilted toward his side during the Iran-Iraq war. Things started to deteriorate only under the Bushes, in his view. Our analysis showed that Saddam believed Bush could not have been talking about him. Instead, Saddam concluded he must have been threatening North Korea, not Iraq. Kim Jong Il, father of Kim Jong Un, possessed the nuclear weapons that the Iraqi president desired but did not have. Bush was dumbfounded by the lack of Saddam’s response to his threats. Later he asked, “How much clearer could I have been?” Duelfer and I had the academic luxury of malleable deadlines in studying Saddam. Langer spent many months on his Hitler study. Scholarship on Kim Jong Un may be too slow for the current crisis. Major decision-makers may instead need to rely on their intuition. Former Secretary of Defense Robert S. McNamara spoke about intuition in a 2003 documentary about his role in the Kennedy and Johnson administrations. McNamara revealed crucial new details about the 1962 Cuban missile crisis. Soviet leader Nikita Khrushchev had smuggled nuclear missiles into Cuba, threatening 90 million Americans. President John F. Kennedy’s first reaction was that he must destroy them with a massive air strike. This would have courted war with the USSR. Seeking the widest possible range of advice, Kennedy asked Llewellyn “Tommy” Thompson, former U.S. ambassador to the Soviet Union, to supplement his foreign policy team during the crisis. Thompson had come to know Khrushchev well and had stayed at his house in Moscow. “Mr. President, you’re wrong,” McNamara recalls Thompson saying of the air strike plans. “I think Khrushchev’s gotten himself in one hell of a fix.” The former ambassador knew that Khrushchev could be impulsive and later regretful. He imagined a terrified Khrushchev, in awe of the events he had set in motion. Thompson suggested that Kennedy help the Soviet leader find his way out of the crisis. Kennedy decided on a naval blockade rather than an air strike, and Khrushchev backed down. The lesson McNamara drew? Empathize with your enemy, and intuit how the world looks to them. “We must try to put ourselves in their skin, and look at ourselves through their eyes,” he said. History tells us that to influence Kim, we must empathize (note: not sympathize) with him. To figure out what makes him tick, Trump and his advisers must first understand how we look to the North Korean leader, peering at us from his very particular vantage point. This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.


Siegfried welcomed the students and expressed his appreciation for their attendance. "You're here today because you're eager to find success in your lives — which is a great thing," he said. "And I'm here because I want to help you develop your leadership skills, create successful habits, and encourage you to think about what makes you happy. Because that's how you find success. That's how you achieve your goals." Siegfried shared personal stories of his own journey from car washer to successful entrepreneur and role model, and encouraged the students to seriously think about their passion in life. In between sessions and during the various presentations, attendees wrote down their insights from the speakers, began to determine their current and future goals, and thought about what steps they should take next to make those goals a reality. Guest speaker David Edward Garcia captivated the crowd with his session, which blended comedy and inspirational speaking to connect with the students in the audience. As someone who discovered his learning style later in his life, he challenged the audience to "find your genius" and write their own story. "Your story is everything and you have the ability to pre-decide your story. And although that can be difficult, difficult does not mean impossible. All difficult means is that you're going to get stronger in the process." Immediately following lunch, and before Siegfried closed the day, attendees were treated to two energizing performances: one by two graduating seniors from Newark High School, and one by an economics teacher and two of his students from Delaware Military Academy. Students from the following schools attended the event: Brandywine, Mount Pleasant, Christiana, St. Ann School, Concord, Newark, St. Edmond's, Positive Outcomes, Delaware Military Academy, Delaware Design Lab, and Nativity Prep. Siegfried Leadership Program™ This impactful program provides an impetus for students in grades 8 through 12 to strengthen their individual leadership during a half-day event that features a series of inspiring talks, group sessions, and sharing of insights. Siegfried Leadership Program™ is a collaborative effort between The Siegfried Group, LLP, Junior Achievement of Delaware, and the University of Delaware's Center for Economic Education and Entrepreneurship. Upcoming Events On October 4, 2017, Siegfried Leadership Program™ will host its third leadership development event for young adults in grades 8 through 12. The event will be held at Clayton Hall on the University of Delaware's campus. For those educators interested in participating in this special event, please visit SiegfriedLeadershipProgram.com. About The Siegfried Group, LLP The Siegfried Group, LLP (Siegfried) works alongside financial executives across the nation, on their most important accounting and finance projects. Filled with an innovative spirit and led by an ambitious entrepreneur, Siegfried provides unique Leadership Advisory combined with high potential talent. At the heart of our Firm is our approach to individual leadership and the continual pursuit of helping people grow both personally and professionally. As a whole, we value being fair, having fun, and fostering stakeholder value. For more information about Siegfried, please visit siegfriedgroup.com. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/for-students-in-delaware-a-successful-future-awaits-those-who-seek-leadership-development-300462561.html


Tomas Rogic celebrates scoring Celtic’s second goal against Aberdeen to go on to win the Scottish Cup Final at Hampden Park in Glasgow, Scotland; graduates of the U.S. Military Academy in West Point, N.Y., toss their hats into the air at the conclusion of the commencement ceremony; and in Srinagar, India, a young, masked Kashmiri protester participates in funeral prayers in absentia for a rebel commander and his associate killed in a gun battle. These are some of the photos of the day. See more news-related photo galleries and follow us on Yahoo News Photo Tumblr.


News Article | May 8, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

RallyPoint, the premier social network for the military community, today announced that Army Major General (ret.) Bruce K. Scott, the President and CEO of The George and Carol Olmsted Foundation, has joined the company’s advisory board. As the head of the Olmsted Foundation, Scott oversees the Olmsted Scholar Program, which since 1959 has challenged young military officers to learn a foreign language and pursue graduate studies in that language at a foreign university. Scott is admired for the passion he brings to guiding young officers to pursue educational excellence by broadening their horizons. Prior to leading the Foundation’s cause, Scott served as Vice President of ITT Industries, a diversified leading manufacturer of highly engineered critical components and customized technology solutions for the energy, transportation and industrial markets. During his 30-year military career, Scott served in numerous leadership positions, including as Commanding General of U.S. Army Security Assistance Command and Chief of Legislative Liaison in the Office of Secretary of the Army. During Scott’s career, he was both the Army’s youngest Brigadier General and youngest Major General. He is a graduate of the U.S. Military Academy, and the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University. “I’m excited to support a team that’s connecting generations of service members and veterans online in a military-focused platform. As a well-educated military community is important to our national security, I’m confident the RallyPoint platform’s continued growth in the higher education space will connect more of our military servicemembers and veterans to opportunities that will benefit their careers and our military overall,” said General Scott. With nearly 1.2 million members – adding a thousand new members each day - RallyPoint breaks down institutional boundaries common to the military experience and allows its members to converse freely across military services and ranks. Membership includes current service members and veterans, as well as civilian supporters, military family members and Department of Defense civilians. “We’re honored to have the opportunity to work closely with General Scott to improve our member’s access to and awareness of the incredible educational programs that are available to them today. It’s inspiring to know that there has been a member of the Scott family on active duty service consistently for the past 130 years. Between his personal service to this country and his work for our military community as the leader of the Olmsted foundation, he brings a wealth of history and experience that will help us manage our rapid growth,” said Dave Gowel, CEO of RallyPoint. ABOUT RALLYPOINT: RallyPoint is the online platform where the troops talk. With nearly 1.2 million members, RallyPoint is the premier social network for military service members and veterans to come together and discuss military life through both professional and personal perspectives. Visit http://www.RallyPoint.com to learn more. Follow RallyPoint on Facebook and Twitter @RallyPoint.


News Article | May 10, 2017
Site: www.cnet.com

There were empty cans of Mountain Dew and Monster Energy everywhere. Despite the pile of energy drinks, there was a surprising calm in the room as I stood by two dozen cadets at the US Military Academy at West Point. They were tasked with building a server and protecting it from breaches by the National Security Agency for a full week. With a lifetime of research -- watching movies about cyberwarfare -- I figured I was all set for this assignment. But there was no dramatic music, no people running around and yelling about "cyber nukes" -- whatever those are. It looked like a normal office, like the one I'm sitting in as I write this. There wasn't even a sweeping camera shot of all the action. Instead, four groups of cadets sat around rows of laptops at the ready. There was the Web Services team, to make sure their websites were up and running; the Web and Forums team, which moderates what goes on in their servers; the Network Monitoring team, which stands guard; and the Strike Team, which takes action to combat breaches. The pace picked up a bit as the NSA sent over a task: creating a password restriction in the next two hours. But even then, there was no dramatic rush or screens filled with flowing rivers of green code. The most noteworthy part of the attack? URLs like "pooploopery.com" and "canadabrokeit.com." Those names sound goofy, but the military is taking its cyberdefense capabilities seriously. This exercise, which is held annually at West Point, is part of an increased focus in military academies to train experts against attacks in the future. After all, cyberwarfare is an increasing concern on and off the battlefield, and the US has already gotten a glimpse of what attacks could look like in the future. The 2016 presidential election was heavily influenced by Russian hackers, while Chinese hackers stole 22 million social security numbers from a federal database in 2015 and North Korean hackers were blamed for a massive breach at Sony the year before. With experts predicting threats like bombings caused by distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attacks, it's become more important to train future officers to defend online. "It's certainly a great emphasis. We see the rise of the cyber branch with the United States Army," Major Michael Petullo, an assistant professor at West Point's military academy said. "Individual privacy and freedom is all pending these days on cyber." That mentality extends beyond the Army's own troops. Last month, the US Air Force issued its "Hack the Air Force" challenge to security specialists around the world, offering hefty rewards to anyone who can break into its public websites. It's a follow-up to challenges like "Hack the Army" and "Hack the Pentagon," in which bug bounty hunters cashed in on $75,000 by identifying the Pentagon's vulnerabilities. It only took five minutes for the first bounty to come during the Army challenge. Since 2000, the NSA has been testing cadets at military schools by "hacking" servers in their classrooms for an entire week. In April, the Naval Academy, the Coast Guard Academy, the Marine Academy, the Military Academy and the Royal Military College of Canada joined in the Cyber Defense Exercise, looking to see who could best fend off the NSA's cyberattacks. As part of the challenge, NSA hackers make up the "Red Cell" and teams from each academy make up "Blue Cells." The NSA is allowed to attack at all times, while the cyberdefense teams are restricted from doing anything between 10 p.m. and 9 a.m. To make things even harder, there's the Gray Cell, bots meant to emulate careless users who hackers typically target. In one Gray Cell scenario, an important politician would come into an Army base with a laptop that potentially has a virus on it. The cadets have to clean off the device and remove any malware before the Gray Cell connects onto the servers. Do you think that's far-fetched? Vice President Mike Pence and Clinton campaign manager John Podesta probably don't. "The threat is real and gets more and more advanced every day. It evolves very rapidly," NSA Red Cell lead Curtis Williams said. The cadets have to prevent the NSA from stealing password tokens, protect their servers from shutdown and block out intruders. The NSA's break-in is inevitable, so the competition becomes about who can defend their servers the longest. "They end up getting in, but they get into everyone's," said Mitch DeRidder, captain of the Army's Blue Cell. "They're closing in as time goes on." After DeRidder assigned the duties for the NSA's password challenge, the room fell quiet again. Attacks still flowed in from the NSA, but they were easy to spot because of their goofy names. The cadets were supposed to monitor for these fake names and block them. Sometimes, it wasn't as obvious as a pooploopery. One ping had come in from lyft.cpm, a rip-off of the popular ride-sharing app. "They're hoping that we make typos," said Conner Wissman, on the Army's Service team. "They're trying to throw us off because every second of blocking these count." The team members' eyes glazed over while watching scores of URLs coming into the servers, a boring but necessary task. "There's nothing I can do, I kind of just sit here and watch," Wissman said. On the Web and Forums team, one cadet folded paper into a small boat. Another cadet, manning the servers, took the boat apart and made a paper hat. By the end of the week, the Navy had won the exercise, but the cadets at West Point weren't defeated. In their loss, they'll be able to learn what went wrong and how to improve for when the nation's cybersecurity is at stake. For future exercises, the NSA wants the academies to be able to collaborate. It also expects to add additional challenges like protecting other connected devices -- think smart appliances and light bulbs. The cadets already see the value in these challenges. "Cyber is one of the biggest national security threats," DeRidder said. "Having trained NSA personnel attacking us, that definitely helped prepare us for the future." It's Complicated: This is dating in the age of apps. Having fun yet? These stories get to the heart of the matter. Tech Enabled: CNET chronicles tech's role in providing new kinds of accessibility.

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