Entity

Time filter

Source Type

Norman, OK, United States

Trademark
Quest Consultants Inc. | Date: 1996-10-22

computer software and manuals sold as a unit for use in hazards analysis.


Trademark
Quest Consultants Inc. | Date: 2000-11-14

Computer software and manuals sold therewith as a unit for use in safety and environmental risk analysis of flammable and toxic materials for the petrochemical industry. Consultation in the field of hazardous material management and related safety issues.


Marx J.D.,Quest Consultants Inc. | Werts K.M.,Quest Consultants Inc.
Journal of Loss Prevention in the Process Industries | Year: 2013

The magnitude of damage due to a vapor cloud explosion can be estimated in many ways, ranging from look-up tables to quantitative risk analysis. An explosion overpressure analysis is a routine part of compliance with the American Petroleum Institute (API) Recommended Practice (RP) 752 when evaluating occupied buildings in a facility that processes flammable or reactive materials. In many cases, a risk-based approach is useful because consequence modeling studies often indicate major problems for buildings at existing facilities. One of the most common risk-based methods, overpressure exceedance, incorporates a wide range of potential explosion scenarios coupled with the probability of each event to develop the probability of exceeding a given overpressure at specific locations. But this and other methods that only use overpressure may not represent an accurate building response. By combining the risk-based methodology of the exceedance analysis with pressure and impulse data in the form of pressure-impulse (P-I) curves, a better measure of building damage can be generated. P-I curves for blast loading determination have been in use for decades, and allow the user to determine levels of damage based on a predicted overpressure and its corresponding impulse. Curves have been published for entire buildings, individual structural members, window breakage, and even consequences to humans. This paper will explore application of P-I curves for building damage, and will highlight some of the benefits, as well as some of the potential problems, of using P-I curves. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.


Denslow D.B.,Quest Consultants Inc. | Cornwell J.B.,Quest Consultants Inc.
18th Topical Conference on Refinery Processing 2015 - Topical Conference at the 2015 AIChE Spring Meeting and 11th Global Congress on Process Safety | Year: 2015

Accidental releases from LPG transport vessels and pipelines can cause devastating damage and loss of life. When a release occurs in equipment that handles LPG, the highly pressurized system can flash into vapor phase, causing a rapidly expanding flammable vapor cloud containing LPG vapor, air, and liquid LPG aerosol droplets. A release from isolated LPG vessels such as railcars and tanker trucks can cause a boiling liquid expanding vapor explosion (BLEVE). Due to the potential hazards associated with transport of LPG and the fuel's ever-increasing demand, it seems prudent to compare the risk associated with different forms of transportation of LPG. Consequence simulations are performed using CANARY by Quest® in order to model the effects of LPG releases from pipelines, tanker trucks, and railcars. The results of the consequence analysis are combined with accident, failure, and release frequency data for the specific equipment employed for each transportation method. The transportation risk associated with pipelines, railcars, and tanker trucks was evaluated with a quantitative risk analysis. The result shows that transporting LPG by pipeline has a significantly lower public risk than transporting LPG by railcar or tanker truck.


Marx J.D.,Quest Consultants Inc. | Werts K.M.,Quest Consultants Inc.
Journal of Loss Prevention in the Process Industries | Year: 2014

An explosion overpressure analysis is a routine part of compliance with the American Petroleum Institute (API) Recommended Practice (RP) 752 and 753. A basic consequence analysis often attempts to demonstrate a few scenarios that may appear to have the most extreme consequences; however, these scenarios may also have extremely low likelihoods of occurrence. To have a better understanding of how likely as well as how extreme a consequence may be, risk-based analysis is often required. One method used for this is an overpressure exceedance analysis which uses overpressure results from many potential explosion scenarios coupled with the probability of each scenario. Pressure-impulse curves can make better use of the explosion model's outputs (pressure and impulse) in order to predict building damage and possible impacts to personnel. Using this type of analysis with a building damage-fatality relationship, an F-N style curve can be created which shows the cumulative frequency vs. the number of potential fatalities. Generation of F-N curves can help to better define the risks to building occupants, provide an additional means of evaluating a building's acceptability, and can serve as a part of a quantitative risk analysis (QRA) for facility personnel. This paper will discuss the method used to predict the probabilities of building occupant fatalities for use in an F-N curve, as well as the benefits and potential problems with this type of analysis. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.

Discover hidden collaborations