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Carty C.P.,Queensland Childrens Gait Laboratory | Carty C.P.,Griffith University | Walsh H.P.J.,Queensland Childrens Gait Laboratory | Gillett J.G.,Queensland Childrens Gait Laboratory | And 5 more authors.
Gait and Posture | Year: 2014

The purpose of this study was to systematically review the current literature to determine the effect of a femoral derotation osteotomy (FDRO) on hip and pelvic rotation kinematics during gait compared to no intervention in children with spastic cerebral palsy (CP). We performed a systematic search for prospective and retrospective cohort studies of children with CP, who were treated with a FDRO, and were assessed with pre and post surgery three-dimensional gait analysis. Medline, CINAHL, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library and Web of Science were searched up to December 2013. Data sources were prospective and retrospective studies. Mean differences were calculated on pooled data for both pelvic and hip rotation kinematics. Thirteen of 196 articles met the inclusion criteria (5 prospective, 8 retrospective). All included studies were of sufficient quality for meta-analysis as assessed using a customised version of the STROBE checklist. Meta-analysis showed that FDRO significantly reduced pelvic retraction by 9.0 degrees and hip internal rotation by 17.6 degrees in participants with unilateral CP involvement and hip internal rotation by 14.3 degrees in participants with bilateral CP involvement. Pelvic symmetry in children with unilateral spastic CP is significantly improved by FDRO. Patients with bilateral involvement do not improve their transverse plane pelvic rotation profiles during gait as a result to FDRO, although this result should be interpreted with caution due to the heterogeneous nature of these participants and of the methods used in the studies assessed. © 2014. Source


Carty C.P.,University of Queensland | Carty C.P.,Queensland Childrens Gait Laboratory | Bennett M.B.,University of Queensland | Dickinson I.C.,Queensland Orthopaedic Oncology Team | Steadman P.,Queensland Orthopaedic Oncology Team
Journal of Electromyography and Kinesiology | Year: 2010

Bone sarcomas are the fourth most common cancer in individuals under 25. years of age. Limb salvage procedures have become increasingly popular for the treatment of osteosarcomas as they have functional and physiological benefits over traditional amputative procedures. The purpose of this study was to assess locomotor patterns post lower limb salvage surgery via electromyographic and energetic measurement techniques on a group of intra-articular knee osteosarcoma patients greater than one year post surgery. A retrospective outcome study was undertaken on 20 limb salvage patients (10♀, 10♂) recruited from the Queensland Bone Tumour Registry. Results showed prolonged activation of rectus femoris and prolonged co-contraction of the rectus femoris and hamstring muscles (p>0.05) in the affected limb of the limb salvage group compared to a control group. Prolonged rectus femoris activation and co-contraction was also evident in the unaffected lower limb suggesting alterations in gait programming within higher neuronal centres. The results are important for the development of rehabilitation programs as they suggest an overall reprogramming of the gait pattern, thereby limiting the impact of conventional strength and stretching interventions. © 2009. Source


Kainz H.,Griffith University | Kainz H.,Queensland Childrens Gait Laboratory | Carty C.P.,Griffith University | Carty C.P.,Queensland Childrens Gait Laboratory | And 3 more authors.
Clinical Biomechanics | Year: 2015

Background Inaccuracies in locating the three-dimensional position of the hip joint centre affect the calculated hip and knee kinematics, force- and moment-generating capacity of muscles and hip joint mechanics, which can lead to incorrect interpretations and recommendations in gait analysis. Several functional and predictive methods have been developed to estimate the hip joint centre location, and the International Society of Biomechanics recommends a functional approach for use with participants that have adequate range of motion at the hip, and predictive methods in those with insufficient range of motion. The purpose of the current systematic review was to substantiate the International Society of Biomechanics recommendations. This included identifying the most accurate functional and predictive methods, and defining 'adequate' range of motion. Methods A systematic search with broad search terms was performed including five databases. Findings The systematic search yielded to 801 articles, of which 34 papers were included. Eleven different predictive and 13 different functional methods were identified. The results showed that the geometric sphere fit method and Harrington equations are the most accurate functional and predictive approaches respectively that have been evaluated in vivo. Interpretation In regard to the International Society of Biomechanics recommendations, the geometric sphere fit method should be used in people with sufficient active hip range of motion and the Harrington equations should be used in patients without sufficient hip range of motion. Multi-plane movement trials with at least 60° of flexion-extension and 30° of ab-adduction range of motion are suggested when using functional methods. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. Source


Kainz H.,Griffith University | Kainz H.,Queensland Childrens Gait Laboratory | Lloyd D.G.,Griffith University | Walsh H.P.J.,Queensland Childrens Gait Laboratory | And 2 more authors.
Gait and Posture | Year: 2016

In motion analysis, pelvis angles are conventionally calculated as the rotations between the pelvis and laboratory reference frame. This approach assumes that the participant's motion is along the anterior-posterior laboratory reference frame axis. When this assumption is violated interpretation of pelvis angels become problematic. In this paper a new approach for calculating pelvis angles based on the rotations between the pelvis and an instantaneous progression reference frame was introduced. At every time-point, the tangent to the trajectory of the midpoint of the pelvis projected into the horizontal plane of the laboratory reference frame was used to define the anterior-posterior axis of the instantaneous progression reference frame. This new approach combined with the rotation-obliquity-tilt rotation sequence was compared to the conventional approach using the rotation-obliquity-tilt and tilt-obliquity-rotation sequences. Four different movement tasks performed by eight healthy adults were analysed. The instantaneous progression reference frame approach was the only approach that showed reliable and anatomically meaningful results for all analysed movement tasks (mean root-mean-square-differences below 5°, differences in pelvis angles at pre-defined gait events below 10°). Both rotation sequences combined with the conventional approach led to unreliable results as soon as the participant's motion was not along the anterior-posterior laboratory axis (mean root-mean-square-differences up to 30°, differences in pelvis angles at pre-defined gait events up to 45°). The instantaneous progression reference frame approach enables the gait analysis community to analysis pelvis angles for movements that do not follow the anterior-posterior axis of the laboratory reference frame. © 2016 Elsevier B.V. Source

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