Hospital Queen Elizabeth I

Kota Kinabalu, Malaysia

Hospital Queen Elizabeth I

Kota Kinabalu, Malaysia
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Tan B.E.,Hospital Pulau Pinang | Lim A.L.,Hospital Pulau Pinang | Kan S.L.,Hospital Pulau Pinang | Lim C.H.,Hospital Pulau Pinang | And 14 more authors.
Rheumatology International | Year: 2017

The effect of biologic disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (bDMARDs) in treating rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in real-world clinical practice remains unknown in Southeast Asia. We aimed to assess the efficacy and safety of bDMARDs among Malaysian RA patients treated in routine clinical practice. A retrospective medical chart review of RA patients from 11 government hospitals were conducted from January 2003 to January 2014. A standardized questionnaire was used to abstract patient’s demographic, clinical and treatment data. Level of disease activity was measured by DAS28 collected at baseline, 3, 6 and 12 months. Three hundred and one patients were available for analysis, mean age 41 (SD, 10.8) years, mean RA duration 12.3 (SD, 6.9) years and 98% had history of two or more conventional-synthetic DMARDs. There were 467 bDMARD courses prescribed with mean bDMARDs duration use of 12.9 months (SD 14.7). Tumour necrosis factor alpha inhibitors were the most common prescribed bDMARDs (77.1%), followed by Tocilizumab (14.6%) and Rituximab (8.4%). We observed significant improvement in mean DAS28 values from baseline to 3, 6 and 12 months (p < 0.001). Overall, 16.9% achieved DAS28 remission at 6 months. A third (35.6%) of patients reported adverse events, three commonest being infections (46.5%), allergy (22.9%) and laboratory abnormalities (12.9%). 3.7% of our patients had tuberculosis. Biologic DMARDs were effective in treating RA in real-world practice in Malaysia, despite a lower remission rate compared to developed countries. Except for higher rates of tuberculosis, the AEs were similar to the published reports. © 2017 Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany

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