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Longueuil, Canada

Dabeka R.,Food Research Division | Fouquet A.,Quebec Regional Laboratory | Belisle S.,Quebec Regional Laboratory | Turcotte S.,Quebec Regional Laboratory
Food Additives and Contaminants - Part A Chemistry, Analysis, Control, Exposure and Risk Assessment | Year: 2011

Lead (Pb), cadmium (Cd) and aluminum (Al) were determined in 437 individual samples of infant formulae, oral electrolytes and 5% glucose solutions available in Canada. In the electrolytes, Cd and Pb concentrations were all below 0.01 and 0.041 ng g -1, respectively. In the 5% glucose solutions, Pb and Cd levels averaged 0.01 and 0.09 ng g -1, respectively. Reported on an as-consumed basis, Pb levels in milk- and soya-based formulae averaged 0.90 and 1.45 ng g -1, respectively, while Cd levels averaged 0.23 and 1.18 ng g -1, respectively Average Al levels on an as-consumed basis were 440 ng g -1 (range 10-3400 ng g -1) in milk-based formulae and 730 ng g -1 (range 230-1100 ng g -1) in soy-based formulae. Al concentrations increased in the following order: plain formula Source


Cao X.-L.,Food Research Division | Perez-Locas C.,Quebec Regional Laboratory | Dufresne G.,Quebec Regional Laboratory | Clement G.,Quebec Regional Laboratory | And 4 more authors.
Food Additives and Contaminants - Part A Chemistry, Analysis, Control, Exposure and Risk Assessment | Year: 2011

A total of 154 food composite samples from the 2008 total diet study in Quebec City were analysed for bisphenol A (BPA), and BPA was detected in less than half (36%, or 55 samples) of the samples tested. High concentrations of BPA were found mostly in the composite samples containing canned foods, with the highest BPA level being observed in canned fish (106 ng g-1), followed by canned corn (83.7 ng g-1), canned soups (22.2-44.4 ng g-1), canned baked beans (23.5 ng g-1), canned peas (16.8 ng g-1), canned evaporated milk (15.3 ng g-1), and canned luncheon meats (10.5 ng g-1). BPA levels in baby food composite samples were low, with 2.75 ng g-1 in canned liquid infant formula, and 0.84-2.46 ng g-1 in jarred baby foods. BPA was also detected in some foods that are not canned or in jars, such as yeast (8.52 ng g-1), baking powder (0.64 ng g-1), some cheeses (0.68-2.24 ng g-1), breads and some cereals (0.40-1.73 ng g-1), and fast foods (1.1-10.9 ng g-1). Dietary intakes of BPA were low for all age- sex groups, with 0.17-0.33 μgkg-1 body weight day-1 for infants, 0.082-0.23 μgkg-1 body weight day-1 for children aged from 1 to 19 years, and 0.052-0.081 μgkg-1 body weight day-1 for adults, well below the established regulatory limits. BPA intakes from 19 of the 55 samples account for more than 95% of the total dietary intakes, and most of the 19 samples were either canned or in jars. Intakes of BPA from non-canned foods are low. © 2011 Her Majesty the Queen in right of Canada. Source


Cao X.-L.,Food Research Division | Perez-Locas C.,Quebec Regional Laboratory | Robichaud A.,Quebec Regional Laboratory | Clement G.,Quebec Regional Laboratory | And 3 more authors.
Food Additives and Contaminants - Part A Chemistry, Analysis, Control, Exposure and Risk Assessment | Year: 2015

Food composite samples from the Canadian Total Diet Study which was conducted each year from 2008 to 2012 rotating between different cities were analysed for bisphenol A (BPA). The overall levels of BPA in the composite food samples from each of the five years from 2008 to 2012 were similar in general with averages (range) of 7.7 ng/g (0.20–106 ng/g), 7.8 ng/g (0.26–110 ng/g), 6.9 ng/g (0.20–84 ng/g), 7.7 ng/g (0.20–105 ng/g) and 9.0 ng/g (0.15–90 ng/g) for 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011 and 2012, respectively. Levels of BPA in most of the non-canned food composite samples were low and no particular trends were observed. In contrast, the trend of BPA levels in canned food composite samples over the five years (2008–2012) varies. BPA levels in most of the canned food composite samples from 2008 to 2012 were consistent in general (e.g. canned luncheon meat: 10–18 ng/g, canned baked beans: 18–25 ng/g). While BPA levels over the five years were found to decrease for some canned food composite samples (e.g., canned fish: 109 ng/g in 2009 vs. 51 ng/g in 2012), they were also found to increase for some other canned food composite samples (e.g. canned meat soups: 90–104 ng/g in 2011–2012 vs. 29 ng/g in 2008). Thus, recent changes in can coating for food packaging to BPA-free alternatives may have not been fully reflected in all canned food products over the period from 2008 to 2012. Continued monitoring is necessary to more fully assess the potential impact on dietary exposure by the use of BPA alternatives in food contact materials. © 2015 Crown Copyright. Published by Taylor & Francis. Source

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