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Patent
Quark Inc | Date: 2016-05-09

A multiplex slide plate device and an operation method thereof are provided. The multiplex slide plate device includes a slide plate and a sacrificial layer. The slide plate has reaction vessels arranged in an array, wherein each of the reaction vessels has an opening portion and a bottom portion. The sacrificial layer has a microfluidic channel, wherein the microfluidic channel has an injection channel, a main channel and a distal channel connected to each other. The sacrificial layer is assembled to the slide plate, wherein the main channel faces the opening portion. A sample solution is injected into the injection channel, such that the sample solution flows from the injection channel through the main channel to the distal channel, wherein the sample solution loads into each of the reaction vessels while flowing through the main channel.


Provided herein are double stranded nucleic acid molecules, compositions comprising same and methods of use thereof for the treatment of a subject wherein expression of DDIT4 is associated with the etiology or progression of a disease or disorder in the subject. The compounds are preferably chemically synthesized and modified dsRNA molecules.


A nucleotide sequence having SEQ ID NO:1, a universal reverse primer having SEQ ID NO:2, a universal RT primer, a method for designing primer, and a miRNA detection method are provided. In the miRNA detection method, the universal RT primer is used for the cDNA synthesis of a miRNA sample and the universal reverse primer is used for cDNA molecule amplification in qPCR quantitative detection. The universal reverse primer sequence, the nucleotide sequence, and the design rules are used in the method for designing primer, so as to design a primer for qPCR quantitative detection.


News Article | October 28, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

Quark Software will be onsite at IBM World of Watson in Las Vegas this week to showcase content automation. Content automation is a transformative new approach to content creation and management that extends the power of cognitive computing. To learn more about the convergence of content automation and cognitive computing visit Quark at IBM World of Watson in booth #831-1. Cognitive computing systems, such as Watson, simulate human thought processes in order to solve problems without human assistance. These systems run by continuously mining and analyzing data. The challenge is that in many cases the data being mined lacks the depth of metadata – information about the content – necessary for cognitive computing systems to identify and relay the appropriate information. To solve this challenge cognitive computing systems, such as Watson, can integrate with content automation systems, such as Quark’s content automation platform, to create Smart Content. Smart Content enables the meaning and context of data to travel with the data from creation to delivery. It also enables the dynamic assembly and updating of content throughout its lifecycle so cognitive computing systems can identify and deliver the right content to the right device at the right time. Quark and IBM are working together with joint customers to bring content automation to cognitive computing, for example in customer support organizations dealing with high volumes of inquiries that use cognitive computing to deliver intelligent and appropriate content to customers. To find out more, please visit Quark at IBM World of Watson: October 24 – 27, 2016 Mandalay Bay in Las Vegas, NV [http://www-01.ibm.com/software/events/wow/ About Quark Software Inc. Quark Software Inc. develops a content automation platform that helps large organizations streamline the creation, management, publishing, and delivery of business-critical content. Our solutions automate the process with reusable Smart Content components that can be dynamically assembled and delivered with precision in any format and to any channel – web, tablet, mobile, print, and more. As a result, leaders in industries such as finance, manufacturing, energy, and government can reduce costs, save time, improve consistency and make their content brilliant. http://www.quark.com Quark and the Quark logo are trademarks or registered trademarks of Quark Software Inc. and its affiliates in the U.S. and/or other countries.


SAN FRANCISCO--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Arrow Electronics, Inc. (NYSE: AWR) will distribute the new Intel® Quark™ processors that Intel unveiled today at its Internet if Things (IoT) Insights event in San Francisco. The new Intel Quark microcontroller D1000, Intel Quark microcontroller D2000 and the Intel Quark SE microcontroller announced today are designed to bring low-cost connectivity, integration and compatibility to the next wave of intelligent things. “We are pleased to add the newest Intel Quark microcontrollers for next-generation embedded and IoT devices," said Aiden Mitchell, vice president of semiconductor marketing at Arrow. “Arrow Electronics is uniquely positioned to support customers with the design, integration, software and connectivity features of their applications built on Quark.” Intel Quark technology extends intelligent computing to devices requiring lower power consumption for sensor input and data actuation applications. The newest Quark processors unveiled today provide flexible, low-power computing for a wide variety of small-form-factor applications. They also come equipped with software- and hardware-based security features designed to protect data from the edge to the data center. “Expanding our Intel Quark brand will enable new IoT devices to enter the market,” said Tanya Pelletier, senior product manager, Intel Quark Solutions Division. “Arrow can help get our products into the engineer, developer and maker communities working on intelligent products and services.” The Intel Quark microcontroller D1000 is currently available for purchase on www.Arrow.com. The Intel Quark microcontroller D2000 and the Intel Quark SE microcontroller will be available for purchase on Arrow.com in early 2016. Arrow Electronics is a global provider of products, services and solutions to industrial and commercial users of electronic components and enterprise computing solutions. Arrow serves as a supply channel partner for more than 100,000 original equipment manufacturers, contract manufacturers and commercial customers through a global network of more than 460 locations in 56 countries. Intel and Intel Quark are trademarks of Intel Corporation in the United States and other countries.


News Article | January 6, 2015
Site: blogs.wsj.com

Intel CEO Brian Krzanich updated his vision for computing and wearable devices in his Computer Electronics Show keynote Tuesday evening, as expected. But the executive also took on Silicon Valley’s sorry record on hiring women and minorities, pledging $300 million over five years to address the issue. “It’s time to step up and do more,” Krzanich said. Intel announced a new goal to reach “full representation” of women and under-represented minorities in the company’s U.S. workforce by 2020. Krzanich didn’t give specific numerical goals, but the company said full representation means Intel’s workforce will be “more representative” of the talent available in America. “This is going to be difficult to achieve,” Krzanich admitted. But he said the company would tie the pay of managers to achieving the diversity goals. “We will as good engineers measure and report our progress on a regular basis with full transparency,” he said. Krzanich said the money will be spent on a variety of programs to help build a fuller pipeline of diverse job candidates, including funding non-profit groups and educators to support better representation of under-represented people in technology and videogame companies. The pledge follows disclosures by many tech companies about disappointing numbers of women and minorities in their ranks, as well as incidents of harassment involving female gamers. (Intel’s own most recent filing, for 2013, said 76% of employees were men and 24% were women; 57% were white, 29% Asian, 8% Hispanic and 4% black. The percentages of women and minorities are smaller for leadership positions). Krzanich, who became CEO in May 2013, has set a pattern of using the big Las Vegas trade show to diverge from purely commercial concerns. Last year, for example, he ended his talk by speaking passionately about the need to rid the semiconductor industry of “conflict materials” believed to help fund violence in some African countries. The discussion of diversity was also a postscript to an address that focused on Krzanich’s effort to move Intel’s chips beyond PCs, as well as efforts to update PCs with technologies such as 3D cameras–a product that the company calls RealSense. Intel showed how the camera could enable tricks such as a virtual piano keyboard, in which a user moves their fingers in air to play notes without touching anything. A company called Ascending Technologies also showed how flying drones can automatically avoid objects when equipped with multiple RealSense cameras. A drone successfully flew through an elaborate obstacle course erected on the side of the CES auditorium without human assistance. Another new disclosure Tuesday was Curie, the code name for an ultra-small module of chip technology that is specifically designed for wearable devices. Besides a processor based on Intel’s Quark technology, the tiny Curie circuit board—which Krzanich showed encapsulated in a sport coat button—has a device for controlling sensors, wireless communications and other components to provide essentially all the functions of an activity tracker or similar devices, said Mike Bell, the vice president in charge of Intel’s new devices group. “This changes the game in wearables,” Krzanich said. Krzanich, who has pushed the chip maker to work with fashion brands, also announced plans to cooperate with Luxottica Group 's Oakley unit. The company said the collaboration would focus on smart versions of premium, luxury and sports eyewear. Intel in December had announced a relationship with Luxottica, while providing few details. Intel also demonstrated how a sensor-packed jacket and software can help a person with limited vision detect people and other objects around them. Krzanich said the company would openly share the technology so developers can improve on it to help the visually impaired. ______________________________________________________ For the latest news and analysis, follow @wsjd. And like us on Facebook to get our news right in your feed: Get breaking news and personal-tech reviews delivered right to your inbox. More from WSJ.D: And make sure to visit WSJ.D for all of our news, personal tech coverage, analysis and more, and add our XML feed to your favorite reader.


News Article | January 7, 2015
Site: gizmodo.com

Here at Intel's big CES keynote, CEO Brian Krzanich is announcing Intel's new Curie Module, a tiny little device that will let you turn all the things you already own and wear into smart devices. It's a little button-sized hardware module, powered by Intel's teeny tiny Quark technology, and it adds a brain to anything you attach it to. Intel started down this road with its stamp-sized 22nm Edison SoC and the Curie module shrinks it down even further. The module uses Bluetooth LE and has a built-in accelerometer and gyroscope to track movements and recognize gestures. It can run either off a rechargeable battery or a more traditional coin-like watch battery, though Intel doesn't say for exactly how long. Curie basically turns just about anything into a gadget that's at least as smart as your average fitness tracker. Rings, buttons, glasses, watches, whathave you. It's not something you would go around attaching to your glasses and your watch yourself, but rather a sort of a bolt-on solution for companies that want to makes simple wearables. Instead of developing their own solutions, they can use Curie as a building block and cram in a pre-programmed brain. Intel plans to start shipping these modules later this year. Welcome to Gizmodo's coverage of all things CES 2015! For our comprehensive rundown of everything new and shiny at the year's biggest gadgetorium, check out our pop-up site here.


News Article | January 6, 2015
Site: www.cnet.com

CES has finally opened its doors to the public, boasting a record 3,600-plus exhibitors and 2.2 million square feet of exhibition space across three distinct areas -- Tech East (at the Las Vegas Convention Centre), Tech West (covering everything from 3D printing, health products and wearables) and the new C Space at ARIA, targeted at marketers, advertisers and social media gurus. CNET's editors have hunted out all the big news (and weird tech from the back booths that you might not have expected) to give you the best possible view of the show. While Press Day saw its fair share of announcements, Ford was the first cab off the rank with the Day 1 opening keynote. After introducing the new iteration of its Smart car platform, Sync 3, last month, Ford mainly looked at the big picture today, discussing the ways cars would collect data in future to adapt to road conditions, help find parking and customise insurance for drivers. Ford didn't show off any cars onstage -- as CEO Mark Fields said, the company's focus isn't on marketing but rather bringing autonomous cars to the masses. However, there was plenty of smooth metal on show from the likes of Audi, Mercedes Benz and BMW to keep auto fans happy. BMW showed off new touchscreen and gesture controls for its iDrive interface, while Pioneer joined the fray with the next generation of its NEX series in-dash multimedia receivers, featuring Android Auto integration. Parrot also promised Android Auto and Apple CarPlay in any car with its new RNB 6. After driving its autonomous car from San Francisco to CES, Audi used its presser to herald the future of driverless cars (even calling one on stage with a smartwatch) before moving on to the new Q7 featuring Android Auto and an Audi Tablet to control interior features. This came off the back of an impressive product display from Mercedes Benz late on Monday evening, when we saw the utterly futuristic F015 Luxury in Motion "car of the future". The spacious silver bullet of a body was remarkably open inside, with rotating chairs for passengers that made it more akin to a futuristic lounge room than a car. Intel's press conference was a showcase event on Day 1, with plenty of new announcements. The chip manufacturer spent a great deal of time focused on RealSense, a system that uses a 3D camera to detect things such as depth and gestures in real time. HP made a cameo on the stage to discuss RealSense integration in its Sprout device -- a computer that also does 3D imaging -- and to promote its ultra-fast Multi Jet Fusion 3D printer. Intel also promoted security applications for RealSense (as a facial recognition tool known as True Key), robotics applications (with iRobot devices capable of detecting and moving through three-dimensional spaces) and showed drones that use RealSense to automatically avoid obstacles while flying. Intel also unveiled the button-sized Curie computer module, packed with sensors and the Quark chip. Even smaller than last year's Edison module, Curie will be central to Intel's wearable strategy for 2015 -- what it dubs "the wearable revolution". To kick things off, Intel is partnering with Oakley to integrate Curie into eyewear. One of the highlights of the CES calendar every year, the Next Big Thing Supersession, held by CNET, took a look at the New Realities of the digital world. A panel of experts, including global heads at Oculus VR and castAR, examined the changing nature of virtual reality and augmented reality and how these major tech innovations will change our technology future. The upshot seems to be that, while they're nascent technologies (creating 3-minutes of VR content can currently cost as much as $1 million) we can expect VR and AR to push rapidly into the mainstream. Oculus wasn't just on-stage with CNET -- the company also used CES to preview its new Oculus Crescent Bay prototype. The new model adds to the immersion with "spatialised audio" to create full 3D sound and the ability to move and walk around the virtual space. And while VR hasn't quite hit the mainstream yet, Razer is hoping to bring it to the masses with the hackable, open-source OSVR Hacker Dev Kit -- a $200 kit that is compatible with Oculus dev kits as well as experimental VR software from Linux and Android. Dell launched a raft of new products at CES 2015, from the smallest 13-inch laptop in the world, the compact and lightweight XPS 13, right through to new iterations of its behemoth Alienware gaming laptops. The new Alienware 15 and Alienware 17 models have been trimmed back a little in size, but you'll probably still want to avoid carrying them around after arm day at the gym. Alongside all the smart home products on show this year, we got a good look at the first wave of HomeKit products at CES, while European security company MyFox took a page out of the Minority Report playbook with a home security system that aims to prevent crime before it happens. There were also a huge range of home networking products on show, as well as plenty of 3D printing with the open-source, open-design LulzBot Mini 3D printer, as well as models that let you print chocolate or print your own drone. It's not just the big showstoppers at CNET -- we've also seen some truly marvellous and oddball stuff. Pet tech has been a winner: after Tagg showed off its heat-sensing pet tracker, Motorola used a spokes-dog to show off the Scout 5000 -- a GPS-enabled collar that allows you to see what your pet sees (through a 720p camera) and even speak to it. Skechers also showed off sneakers with the Simon memory game integrated into the side of the shoe, while visitors looking for a refreshing post-show drink could contemplate dropping a cool $1,100 for the Kube Bluetooth speaker with in-built cooler. And to stretch out those tired legs, the Smart Mat interactive yoga mat uses built-in sensors to check your yoga poses and guide you along the way. Very necessary after a long day. If you want more news from CES you can catch up on everything from Press Day yesterday, follow CNET on social media and sign up for CNET's In-Depth newsletter series. We'll send you a daily wrap up of all the important news from the show, and when it's all done and dusted in Vegas, you won't hear from us again. And if you're at the show, don't forget to take CNET's tour of the must-see stands at CES 2015. In the meantime, to keep across all the important news from CES, make sure you head to CNET's dedicated landing page. You'll find everything from hands-on product demos, news and interviews, to videos from the show floor and plenty of shots of the action at the show.


Intel officials reportedly will be showing off new wearable computing devices powered by the chip maker's Quark processing technology at the Consumer Electronics Show 2014 this week. Speaking to the Website Recode, CEO Brian Krzanich said the vendor at CES will announce its latest Quark chip and will demonstrate some wearable devices that Intel engineers have created. Krzanich didn't elaborate on what the devices will be, but is pushing the idea of the x86-based Quark technology being a driver of the burgeoning wearable computing trend. "Our view is that Quark can make almost everything smart," the CEO told the Website. "We'll show you some things that you would never have thought could become smart and communicate." Google Glass is probably the most high-profile example of wearable devices, which also include fitness and activity trackers as well as a growing line of smartwatches, such as offerings from Samsung and Qualcomm's Toq. Analysts expect the market to boom in the coming years. Berg Insight in October said shipments of wearable devices hit 8.3 million units in 2012 and will grow to 64 million units in 2017. Juniper Research in July predicted 150 million units will ship in 2018. Device and component makers are all looking to gain traction in the market. Broadcom is developing a smart chip platform for wearable devices, and ARM in September bought Cadence's PANTA display controller technology, a move that will help the company's efforts in high-end, low-power devices. Krzanich, at the company's Intel Developer Forum in September, introduced the Quark family of processors, which are smaller and more energy-efficient than Intel's Atom platform. The Quark chips are aimed at the Internet of things and wearable devices. The wearable devices will be part of a larger presentation by Krzanich during his keynote address at CES. The CEO said he also will talk about Intel's efforts in mobile devices, including tablets. "What you will see at CES [are] tablets that are doing some things that you didn't think possible," he told Recode. "We'll bring some new innovations in imaging, for example." Krzanich is scheduled to speak at CES Jan. 6.


News Article | June 29, 2015
Site: yourstory.com

While the ‘Silicon Valley of India’, Bengaluru, is spearheading the growth of the startup ecosystem in the country, there are smaller ‘Valleys’ coming up in different parts of the country. Chandigarh, ‘The City Beautiful’, is certainly one of the most promising. The city which was the first post-independence planned city in the country, boasts of a well-defined infrastructure and an efficient administration. Roads are wide, the traffic is rather well managed, and there is functional air connectivity with all major cities.  The quality of life in Chandigarh is one of the best in the country with scenic mountains just a few hours away for a weekend getaway. Chandigarh boasts of an emerging IT Park, and along with its sister cities – Mohali and Panchkula (together known as Tricity) – is home to some major multinational corporations like Quark, Infosys, Dell, IBM, and TechMahindra. Having already the attention of the Software and IT services companies, the startup brigade might also be interested in setting up a strong base in Chandigarh. Chandigarh  has had a long association with entrepreneurship (interestingly, the Bansals of Flipkart fame belong to the city and were recently seen in a TV Interview at their alma mater). India’s first private sector startup accelerator ‘Morpheus’ was based out of the city and had incubated around 80 odd startups, including CommonFloor, Practo, and Akosha, till it shut its accelerator program last year. ‘The Hatch’ (now defunct) founded by Puneet Vatsayan was another incubator that grew out of Chandigarh. Chandigarh is in close proximity to Haryana, Punjab and Himachal Pradesh and attracts a lot of talent from these states. The availability of a large number of motivated and talented people ready to take up new roles and responsibilities is one of the biggest advantages that the city provides. The city is also an education hub of the region. The presence of multiple educational institutions in and around the city also ensures constant supply of skilled manpower. Traditionally, talented youth and startup folks from the region ended up moving to Delhi, Bengaluru and Mumbai for better opportunities. However, as the eco-system of the region improves and the over-crowded metros are no longer attractive, the amount of talent leaving the region has started dwindling, and a lot of professionals have started to move back as well. A lot of entrepreneurs in the region believe that this trend will continue to improve. On being asked why he chose to startup in Chandigarh, Kunal Nandwani, Founder of uTrade Solutions, a financial trading technology startup, says, “I am originally from Chandigarh. I started from my parents’ house to keep the cost of setup low. I also wanted to live close to my family. Besides, Chandigarh offers the best ‘quality of life’ in India. There was ample fresh talent available and a considerable number of experienced candidates were willing to come back after having worked in Tier 1 cities, as their homes were also in and around Chandigarh (across Haryana, Punjab, Himachal, etc.).” Samar Singla, CEO of Click-Labs and Founder of Jugnoo, says, “Chandigarh is without doubt one of best cities to live in – so there are a lot of people working in the metros who are willing to come back to Chandigarh and settle here. There are many who want to get away ‘from the crowded life’ in the bigger cities.” Kunal Nandwani further states that, “Tier 2and 3 cities like Chandigarh are very pragmatic for startups where entrepreneurs may have their roots or family connections. All such cities have decent educational institutions from where the talent may be sourced, localities keen to live near their home towns are likely to stick around longer, competition from larger firms during hiring is lower, quality of life is better (lesser traffic, etc.), and there is ample infrastructure available to remain connected to the rest of the world. Marketing and sales teams can always travel around, or be based closer to client locations. The world is flat from a technology development standpoint- companies like Google, Microsoft, and others have proved that with their development centres across the world, including India. So Tier 2 cities are definitely good, low cost choices. At uTrade, we have clients in over 10 countries, and three major cities in India; clearly we cannot have offices everywhere. Even if we are in a Tier 1 city like Mumbai or Delhi, we have to run various functions remotely and travel to client locations, and have local client-facing people in different locations depending upon business size. So Chandigarh works best for us.” On the point of the potential of  Tier 2 and3 cities becoming startup hubs, Kunal says, “The access to talent is limited in Tier 2 and3 cities, but attrition in is also lower in the long term. Our clients and investors are in Tier 1 cities, but we travelled to these locations and convinced them to partner with us. The cost of infrastructure may be a little higher (internet for example) but that’s acceptable in the grand scheme of things, as the office rentals, etc. are lower. Attrition is lower, quality of life is better. You waste less time in traffic, compared to Bangalore / Mumbai and you can save 1-4 hours a day that can be used for achieving a greater work-life balance, leaving team members to be more satisfied.” The tricity area is also home to a customer base which is maturing at a fast pace and is willing to try new ideas and concepts. Samar Singla, on this point says ‘…but you can still vet the traction in Chandigarh for your target segment, which is the same as you will find in Delhi or Bangalore…metro cities have already become so crowded in terms of startups that you can’t actually test your product and see the traction in its truest sense. People have already become overloaded with information on so many startups.” However, while the target segment is similar to the metros, it is still  small, and many entrepreneurs find it hard to convince customers to try their services. Siddhanth, who runs an online grocery shopping startup, Soulbowl, says, “…there are virtually no corporates here in Chandigarh to speak off. Customers are not very inclined to shop online as they have a lot of time on their hands  due to the conveniences that Chandigarh offers, and prefer going out to shop. It’s a big challenge convincing the customers that they will get the same quality and product at their doorstep at the same price, anytime they want.” On the point of issues faced while working in the city, Samar comments, “One of the major issues I have faced is that despite having a great product, which everyone loves, there are still a lot of people who don’t join because of us not being located in a metro city. But the people who do tend to stay longer – so yes, it is both a good and a bad thing. Apart from that, scale, in terms of the numbers you can achieve, is a little less due to the population though it still helps to get the product tested and refined, after which it is very easy to take the product to a metro city and move ahead of the competition.” Alankar Narula who runs a legal services startup, thesuits.in says “Every city has its own benefits and its drawbacks, but Chandigarh, in a way is nice, because its benefits outweigh the drawbacks. Starting a new business is not really a difficult task in the city because of the availability of resources and easy access to each and every place in the city.” Clearly, Chandigarh has a lot of potential of becoming the next  startup hub of the country, but it will take some time for it to be able to tangibly challenge the benefits provided by the metros. It will be interesting to track the progress till then, considering that the  journey seems to have already begun. There are already multiple service/product startups that have lent validation to this theory. GrayCell Technologies,  uTrade Solutions, Jugnoo, Click-Labs, Exito Gourmet, Pick Meals , and Yuvshaala are some of the most interesting startups operating from the city currently. Apart from these, here are a few more promising startups that have been launched in the city in the past 3 months: BulBul is a beauty services on-demand startup launched in April, 2015, by Sahil Bansal. It was started, keeping in mind the importance of developing a well-groomed personality. It offers beauty care and services to working ladies and housewives, at a reasonable cost, within the comfort of their own home.  Professional beauty services  and treatments offered by BulBul are delivered by experienced beauty professionals and makeover artists using high quality products and brands. It has  more than 1000 regular users already. Bistro Offers is a restaurant loyalty platform being incubated at Click-Labs. It lets users get the best out of their favourite restaurants by offering them special and exclusive deals on their Smartphone – without the hassle of searching for or buying coupons. Users can go to a restaurant and redeem an offer straight out of the Bistro Offers App. This helps restaurants in increasing customer loyalty while providing an incentive to customers to keep coming back. Bistro Offers plans to expand into other restaurant related domains so that it can become a one-stop shop for every foodie – be it looking at a restaurant’s menu, ordering at home or before reaching a restaurant, posting reviews, or even paying the bill. Soulbowl is very similar to BigBasket.com, operating out of Chandigarh. It was started in the March, 2015,by Siddhant Das with a mission to make online shopping of groceries simple, fast, and efficient, while assuring good quality and customer service at the same time. It aims to be a marketplace for retailers. At present, it is the tricity’s largest e- commerce company with over 8000 products on its platform. There are 5 convenient delivery time slots which the customer can choose from between 10 am to 8 pm. They have been receiving a good number of repeat customers and seem to be growing at a fast pace.

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