QuantaMatrix Inc.

South Korea

QuantaMatrix Inc.

South Korea
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Song Y.,Seoul National University | Jeong Y.,Seoul National University | Kwon T.,Seoul National University | Lee D.,Seoul National University | And 5 more authors.
Lab on a Chip - Miniaturisation for Chemistry and Biology | Year: 2017

Although droplet microfludics is a promising technology for handling a number of liquids of a single type of analyte, it has limitations in handling thousands of different types of analytes for multiplex assay. Here, we present a novel “liquid-capped encoded microcapsule”, which is applicable to various liquid format assays. Various liquid drops can be graphically encoded and arrayed without repeated dispensing processes, evaporation, and the risk of cross-contamination. Millions of nanoliter-scale liquids are encapsulated within encoded microcapsules and self-assembled in microwells in a single dispensing process. The graphical code on the microcapsule enables identification of randomly assembled microcapsules in each microwell. We conducted various liquid phase assays including enzyme inhibitor screening, virus transduction, and drug-induced apoptosis tests. The results showed that our liquid handling technology can be utilized widely for various solution phase assays. © The Royal Society of Chemistry.


Kwon S.,Seoul National University | Kwon S.,QuantaMatrix Inc. | Jeong H.Y.,Seoul National University | Kim E.-G.,QuantaMatrix Inc. | And 8 more authors.
20th International Conference on Miniaturized Systems for Chemistry and Life Sciences, MicroTAS 2016 | Year: 2016

Antibiotic resistance has globally arisen as an urgent problem to be tackled. To save patients with infectious diseases, fast and accurate decision of antibiotic susceptibility is essential. However, total turnaround time of current clinical process for appropriate prescription takes more than three days for general infections, a month for tuberculosis. Thus, most of early prescription for urgent patients depend on conventional experience of clinical experts, which can be led to additional antimicrobial resistance and misjudgement. To reduce turnaround time of clinical process, we developed rapid antibiotic susceptibility test platform for tackling global antibiotic resistance based on microfluidics.


Jeong H.Y.,Seoul National University | Kim E.-G.,QuantaMatrix Inc. | Han S.,QuantaMatrix Inc. | Lee G.Y.,Seoul National University | And 9 more authors.
Proceedings of the IEEE International Conference on Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS) | Year: 2017

For the timely treatment of patients with infections in bloodstream and cerebrospinal fluid, a rapid antimicrobial susceptibility test (AST) is urgently needed. This paper describe a direct and rapid antimicrobial susceptibility testing (dRAST) system, which can determine the antimicrobial susceptibility of bacteria from a positive blood culture bottle (PBCB) in six hours that conventionally taking more than 30-50 hours. Design consideration, clinical verification, commercialization, and application of dRAST system to tuberculosis are reviewed. © 2017 IEEE.


A testing method is disclosed. The testing method includes: providing a mixture solution of a gelling agent and a microbe to a gelling device; solidifying the mixture solution to form a solid thin film in which the microbe is immobilized; supplying a bioactive agent to the solid thin film and allowing the bioactive agent to diffuse into the solid thin film; and imaging the individual responses of the single microbial cells to the bioactive agent, and determining the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of the bioactive agent based on the analysis of the images to obtain AST results.


Choi J.,Korea Basic Science Institute | Choi J.,Seoul National University | Yoo J.,QuantaMatrix Inc. | Lee M.,QuantaMatrix Inc. | And 14 more authors.
Science Translational Medicine | Year: 2014

A rapid antibiotic susceptibility test (AST) is desperately needed in clinical settings for fast and appropriate antibiotic administration. Traditional ASTs, which rely on cell culture, are not suitable for urgent cases of bacterial infection and antibiotic resistance owing to their relatively long test times. We describe a novel AST called single-cellmorphological analysis (SCMA) that can determine antimicrobial susceptibility by automatically analyzing and categorizing morphological changes in single bacterial cells under various antimicrobial conditions. The SCMAwas testedwith four Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute standard bacterial strains and 189 clinical samples, including extended-spectrum b-lactamase-positive Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae, imipenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, and vancomycin-resistant Enterococci from hospitals. The results were compared with the gold standard broth microdilution test. The SCMA results were obtained in less than 4 hours, with 91.5% categorical agreement and 6.51% minor, 2.56% major, and 1.49% very major discrepancies. Thus, SCMA provides rapid and accurate antimicrobial susceptibility data that satisfy the recommended performance of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Copyright © 2014 American Association for the Advancement of Science.


Kim J.,Seoul National University | Kim E.-G.,Seoul National University | Kim E.-G.,QuantaMatrix Inc. | Bae S.,Seoul National University | And 3 more authors.
Analytical Chemistry | Year: 2013

The parallelization of microfluidic cytometry is expected to lead to considerably enhanced throughput enabling point-of-care diagnosis. In this article, the development of a microfluidic potentiometric multichannel cytometer is presented. Parallelized microfluidic channels sharing a fluid path inevitably suffer from interchannel signal crosstalk that results from electrical coupling within the microfluidic channel network. By employing three planar electrodes within a single detection channel, we electrically decoupled each channel unit, thereby enabling parallel analysis by using a single cytometer microchip with multiple microfluidic channels. The triple-electrode configuration is validated by analyzing the size and concentration of polystyrene microbeads (diameters: 1.99, 2.58, 3, and 3.68 μm; concentration range: ∼2 × 105 mL-1 to ∼1 × 10 7 mL-1) and bacterial microdispersion samples (Bacillus subtilis, concentration range: ∼4 × 105 CFU mL-1 to ∼3 × 106 CFU mL-1). Crosstalk-free parallelized analysis is then demonstrated using a 16-channel potentiometric cytometer (maximum cross-correlation coefficients |r|: < 0.13 in all channel combinations). A detection throughput of ∼48 000 s-1 was achieved; the throughout can be easily increased with the degree of parallelism of a single microchip without additional technical complexities. Therefore, this methodology should enable high-throughput and low-cost cytometry. © 2012 American Chemical Society.


PubMed | QuantaMatrix Inc. and Seoul National University
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Biomicrofluidics | Year: 2015

Fabrication methods for the development of multiplexed immunoassay platforms primarily depend on the individual functionalization of reaction chambers to achieve a heterogeneous reacting substrate composition, which increases the overall manufacturing time and cost. Here, we describe a new type of low-cost fabrication method for a scalable immunoassay platform based on cotton threads. The manufacturing process involves the fabrication of functionalized fibers and the arrangement of these fibers into a bundle; this bundle is then sectioned to make microarray-like particles with a predefined surface architecture. With these sections, composed of heterogeneous thread fragments with different types of antibodies, we demonstrated quantitative and 7-plex immunoassays. We expect that this methodology will prove to be a versatile, low-cost, and highly scalable method for the fabrication of multiplexed bioassay platforms.


A testing method is disclosed. The testing method includes: providing a mixture solution of a gelling agent and a microbe to a gelling device; solidifying the mixture solution to form a solid thin film in which the microbe is immobilized; supplying a bioactive agent to the solid thin film and allowing the bioactive agent to diffuse into the solid thin film; and imaging the individual responses of the single microbial cells to the bioactive agent, and determining the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of the bioactive agent based on the analysis of the images to obtain AST results.


A testing method is disclosed. The testing method includes: providing a mixture solution of a gelling agent and a microbe to a gelling device; solidifying the mixture solution to form a solid thin film in which the microbe is immobilized; supplying a bioactive agent to the solid thin film and allowing the bioactive agent to diffuse into the solid thin film; and imaging the individual responses of the single microbial cells to the bioactive agent, and determining the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of the bioactive agent based on the analysis of the images to obtain AST results.


A testing method is disclosed. The testing method includes: providing a mixture solution of a gelling agent and a microbe to a gelling device; solidifying the mixture solution to form a solid thin film in which the microbe is immobilized; supplying a bioactive agent to the solid thin film and allowing the bioactive agent to diffuse into the solid thin film; and imaging the individual responses of the single microbial cells to the bioactive agent, and determining the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of the bioactive agent based on the analysis of the images to obtain AST results.

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