Conneaut Lakeshore, PA, United States
Conneaut Lakeshore, PA, United States

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Jahangirnejad S.,Quality Engineering Solutions Inc. | Morian D.,Quality Engineering Solutions Inc. | Scheetz B.,University Park | Solaimanian M.,University Park
Geotechnical Special Publication | Year: 2015

The pozzolanic nature of fly ash makes it an excellent material for partial replacement of hydraulic cement in many road construction applications. This paper presents such an application for a specific type of cementitious fly ash from a power generating plant using fluidized bed combustion (FBC) called FBC ash. The Portland cement-FBC ash combination was used in full depth reclamation (FDR) of a low volume road in Pennsylvania. The initial mixture design for FDR was conducted for 100% cement as the chemical stabilizer, optimizing the water and cement contents through an engineered design process. Subsequent to the development of the initial mixture design, 50% of the cement was replaced by FBC ash and density and unconfined compressive strength tests were conducted on the cement-FBC ash blend to determine the impact of this replacement on strength and density. Construction of this cement-FBC ash FDR and the all-cement FDR were conducted successfully. Results from unconfined compressive tests on field cores obtained after construction indicated that specimens obtained from cement-FBC ash sections had slightly higher strength than the all-cement specimens. © ASCE 2015.


Wang G.,Quality Engineering Solutions Inc. | Roque R.,University of Florida
Road Materials and Pavement Design | Year: 2011

The effects of truck tire types on near-surface pavement responses were evaluated via finite element anyalysis. First, two wide-based truck radial tires (425/65R22.5 and 445/50R22.5) were modeled based on the tire geometries and specifications from the tire manufactures. Accordingly, tire-pavement interaction models were developed. These models were then calibrated to make sure models can be used for further evaluation purpose. A study on how truck tire types affect near-surface respones were investigated based on calibrated tire-pavement contact models. The results indicated that the Super Single (SS) (425/65R22.5) tire produced the worst damage to the pavement in terms of top-down cracking and AC rutting in Asphalt Concrete (AC) layers, while New Generation Wide-Based (NGWB) tire (445/50R22.50) induced approximately the same damage as the standard dual tire assembly (11R22.5) evaluated in this study. © 2011 Lavoisier, Paris.


Wang G.,Quality Engineering Solutions Inc. | Roque R.,University of Florida | Morian D.,Quality Engineering Solutions Inc.
Transportation Research Record | Year: 2011

A sophisticated three-dimensional (3-D) tire model was placed directly on a three-layer asphalt concrete (AC) pavement system to form a 3-D tire-pavement contact model. The model was then verified with measured contact stresses and was used to investigate near-surface stress states in the AC layer. When compared with the traditional uniform vertical loading model, the 3-D tire-pavement contact model produced stress states not only higher in magnitude but also more variable in distribution. The 3-D tire-pavement contact model produced much higher principal tensile stress and maximum shear stress near the tire edge; the increased stress was a possible explanation for instability rutting and associated top-down cracking. A critical shear plane was developed for the top 50 mm of the AC layer by using a p-q diagram, and the tire-pavement contact model produced a much higher shear yield percentage.


Wang G.,Quality Engineering Solutions Inc. | Roque R.,University of Florida | Dennis Morian P.E.,Quality Engineering Solutions Inc.
Journal of Materials in Civil Engineering | Year: 2012

Road surface profile is an important factor that affects the dynamic responses of the vehicle, which in turn affects pavement responses. In this study, a complete two-dimensional (2D) axle-tire-pavement interaction finite-element model was developed to investigate the effects of a rutted surface on near-surface pavement responses. The results indicate there is a significant difference in tire-pavement contact stress distributions between a rutted surface and a flat surface. The presence of a rutted surface increases both the propensity for top-down cracking and the severity of instability rutting. The observed trend indicates that the greater the existing rut severity is, the more likely it is for top-down cracking and increased rutting to occur. © 2012 American Society of Civil Engineers.


Wang G.,Quality Engineering Solutions Inc. | Roque R.,University of Florida
International Journal of Pavement Research and Technology | Year: 2011

The effects of truck tire types on near-surface pavement responses were evaluated via finite element anyalysis. First, three truck radial tires (11R22.5, 425/65R22.5, and 445/50R22.5) were modeled based on the tire geometries and specifications from the tire manufactures. Accordingly, tire-pavement interaction models were developed. These models were then verified by comparing predicted contact stresses with measured ones to make sure models can be used for further evaluation purpose. The results indicated that the super single (425/65R22.5) tire produced greater contact stress and more damage to the pavement in terms of top-down cracking and instability rutting, while new generation wide-based tire (445/50R22.50) induced approximately the same damage as the standard dual assembly tested (11R22.5). © Chinese Society of Pavement Engineering.


Yeh L.,Pennsylvania State University | Stoffels S.M.,Pennsylvania State University | Wang G.,Quality Engineering Solutions Inc. | Morian D.,Quality Engineering Solutions Inc.
Airfield and Highway Pavement 2013: Sustainable and Efficient Pavements - Proceedings of the 2013 Airfield and Highway Pavement Conference | Year: 2013

A series of full-scale accelerated tests to validate and improve current airfield pavement design and rehabilitation has been conducted at the National Airport Pavement Test Facility (NAPTF), which is operated by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). Construction Cycle 4 (CC4) consisted of unbonded concrete overlays and included two phases: the Baseline Experiment and the SCI Validation Study. The experiment included three structural cross-sections subjected to triple dual-tandem and twin dual-tandem loadings. Distress surveys and nondestructive testing were conducted regularly on the test items. Various instruments were installed at designed locations within the test items to capture mechanical behavior of the unbonded concrete overlays and underlying slabs. Linear position transducers (LPT) are one type of installed instrument, which were used to measure the vertical movements of both underlying and overlay pavement slabs due to environmental factors and moving loads. © 2013 American Society of Civil Engineers.


Morian D.,Quality Engineering Solutions Inc. | Wang G.W.,Quality Engineering Solutions Inc. | Frith D.,Quality Engineering Solutions Inc.
Asphalt Pavements - Proceedings of the International Conference on Asphalt Pavements, ISAP 2014 | Year: 2014

The concept of strain limit design as applied to heavy industrial pavements is discussed. The strain limit approach has been applied following the mechanistic design methodology provided in the Asphalt Institute's MS 23 document. This design approach has been found to be beneficial in some cases when used in the design of flexible pavement sections for heavy duty industrial asphalt pavements with high load repetitions. Several multilayer pavement systems are considered when subjected to various heavy wheel load configurations, to assess the potential benefit to pavement cost and performance. The paper assesses how the design input conditions of subgrade support, applied wheel load stress, and load repetitions influence the effectiveness of the strain limit design approach. Under some combinations of design conditions the strain limit design approach shows promise for use in the design of these heavily loaded pavements. © 2014 Taylor & Francis Group, London.


Wang G.,Quality Engineering Solutions Inc. | Morian D.,Quality Engineering Solutions Inc. | Frith D.,Quality Engineering Solutions Inc.
Journal of Materials in Civil Engineering | Year: 2013

In this paper, a cost-benefit analysis is reported for selecting the most economical alternative among various pavement preservation choices using life-cycle cost analysis analytical technology. The impact of pavement conditions on the performance of the specific treatment was investigated in terms of pavement performance curves, which were developed for the treatments under varying pavement condition levels at each traffic network based on Pennsylvania Department of Transportation overall pavement index (OPI) data. A relationship between pavement life extension and pavement condition prior to the treatment was established. Finally, life-cycle cost analysis was conducted to quantify the impact of the pavement condition on the performance of the preservative treatments in terms of the benefit-to-cost ratio and net equivalent uniform annual cost. There is an optimum pavement condition and associated age (or a range of conditions or ages) in which the benefit-to-cost ratio that is associated with a treatment is maximized.© 2013American Society of Civil Engineers.


Buch N.,Michigan State University | Jahangirnejad S.,Quality Engineering Solutions Inc.
International Conference on Concrete Pavement Design, Construction and Rehabilitation | Year: 2011

The coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) is defined as the change in unit length per unit change in temperature. It is usually expressed in microstrain (10 -6) per degree Celsius (μ&EPSI/°C) or microstrain (10 -6) per degree Fahrenheit (μ&EPSI/°F). The CTE of Portland Cement Concrete (PCC) is an Important parameter In analyzing thermally induced stresses in jointed concrete pavements (JCPs) during the first 72-hours after paving and over the pavement design life. The magnitude of CTE is also important in determining the amount of joint movement, slab length, and joint sealant reservoir design. The Mechanistic-Empirical Pavement Design Guide (M-E PDG) allows for the input of CTE at three levels (quality of data); (i) Level 1 of CTE determination involves direct measurement in accordance with a test protocol developed by American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO) titled AASHTO TP60, "Standard Test Method for CTE of Hydraulic Cement Concrete" (Now, AASHTO T336-10, Standard Method of Test for Coefficient of Thermal Expansion of Hydraulic Cement Concrete); (ii) Level II of CTE determination uses a weighted average of the constituent values based on the relative volumes of the constituents; and (iii) Level III of CTE estimation is based on historical data. This paper quantifies the impact of test variables such as aggregate geology, sample age and the number of heating and cooling cycles on the magnitude of CTE. Furthermore, the paper summarizes the Impact of these CTE test variables on the predicted performance (e.g. transverse cracking) of jointed concrete pavements using M-E PDG models.


Wang G.,Quality Engineering Solutions Inc. | Frith D.,Quality Engineering Solutions Inc. | Morian D.,Quality Engineering Solutions Inc.
Civil Engineering and Urban Planning III - Proceedings of the 3rd International Conference on Civil Engineering and Urban Planning, CEUP 2014 | Year: 2014

In this study, a case study based on pavement management system (PMS) program StreetSaver® was conducted on a west costal city in USA to evaluate the overall condition of the city street network and highlighted the impacts of various funding levels on the network pavement condition and deferred maintenance backlog. Through the case study, the PMS program StreetSaver® demonstrates that it is an effective tool for local pavement network. Local governments can predict the future condition of their pavement for different levels of funding and show the effects of under-funded road programs. With the progress of urbanization in China, the study may help China local agencies to gain the knowledge of pavement management practice on a local level and thus give some meaningful implication for the future application of PMS in China. © 2014 Taylor & Francis Group.

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