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St Leonards, Australia

Scott T.R.D.,Quadriplegic Hand Research Unit | Scott T.R.D.,University of Sydney | Vare V.A.,Quadriplegic Hand Research Unit
Medical and Biological Engineering and Computing | Year: 2015

Sensitivity analysis for a user command controller monitoring head position for artificial control of the proximal upper limb was performed. The controller was evaluated by having subjects complete target matching tasks manipulating a simulated on-screen hand representation to investigate the effects of target location and target speed on performance. Sixteen subjects took part in the study, 11 of whom had sustained cervical spinal cord injuries. The subjects were able to control the on-screen hand with overall low sensitivity of performance with the controller to target position in its five-degrees-of-freedom. The optimal speed was found to be a compromise between low speed and high accuracy but longer completion time and fast speed for short completion time with lower accuracy. The results demonstrated the robustness of the controller across a population of non-injured subjects and those with tetraplegia. © 2015, ©Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Australia as represented by: Royal North Shore Hospital. Source


Scott T.R.D.,Quadriplegic Hand Research Unit | Scott T.R.D.,University of Sydney | Vare V.A.,Quadriplegic Hand Research Unit
Medical and Biological Engineering and Computing | Year: 2013

An independent lifestyle requires the ability to place the hand in the complete workspace in concert with hand grasp and release. A novel user command controller monitoring head position for purpose of controlling hand location and orientation is proposed and demonstrated. The controller detected five degrees of freedom which were applied to upper limb movements including forearm and hand placement in three-dimensional space. The controller was evaluated by having subjects complete tracking tasks manipulating a simulated on-screen upper limb representation. Thirteen of the eighteen subjects assessed using the controller had sustained a spinal cord injury at or above the sixth cervical vertebra. Two of the injured subjects with decreased cervical spine mobility were unable to operate the controller. The remaining subjects performed the tracking tasks effectively after minimal training. This simple five-degree of freedom controller has been proposed for the use by those disabled by upper limb amputation, paralysis, weakness or hypertonicity. © 2012 Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Australia. Source

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