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Nashua, NH, United States

Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Missile Defense Agency | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 893.86K | Year: 2014

We propose to combine QmagiQ's strained layer superlattice (SLS) sensor technology with MIT Lincoln Laboratory's novel digital pixel readout integrated circuit (DROIC) to realize an advanced longwave infrared digital focal plane array (DFPA) with high quantum efficiency, dynamic range, and operating temperature. In Phase I, we developed the basic SLS DFPA and demonstrated its extraordinarily high signal-to-noise. In Phase II, we will optimize the DFPA, integrate it into a full-fledged surveillance system, and test it in the field. It's field performance will be directly compared to an identical system with a mercury cadmium telluride FPA.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Missile Defense Agency | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 125.00K | Year: 2015

We propose to bandgap-engineer the antimony-based Group III-V compound semiconductor material system to realize a dualband focal plane array (FPA) made up of stacked multi-barrier Type-II strained layer superlattice (SLS) photodiodes. Two longwave infrared (LWIR) spectral bands will be imaged in alternate frames by using a readout multiplexer that flips the voltage bias across the FPA from frame to frame. In Phase I, we will re-design the basic LWIR SLS photodiode to significantly increase quantum efficiency over the current state-of-the-art while minimizing dark current. Phase II will use this breakthrough to develop a longwave/longwave dualband infrared FPA with the high quantum efficiency and low spectral crosstalk. We will also engage with a Systems Prime in Phase II to package the FPA for a systems level test following Phase II. Approved for Public Release 14-MDA-8047 (14 Nov 14)


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Missile Defense Agency | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 1.50M | Year: 2011

We propose to develop and deliver 2-Color midwave/longwave infrared focal plane arrays (FPAs) and a camera based on Type-II InAs/InGaSb strained layer superlattice (SLS) sensor technology. 2-Color SLS FPAs with formats of 320x256 and 640x512 will be delivered, together with a portable 2-Color 320x256 camera. In Phase I, we designed and demonstrated the basic 2-Color midwave/longwave infrared SLS photodiode. Phase II will optimize and translate this design into FPAs that provide 2-Color infrared imaging for missile defense applications.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Missile Defense Agency | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 1.00M | Year: 2012

In Phase I we developed a novel infrared photodiode based on Type-II InAs/GaSb strained layer superlattices (SLS) that showed pingpong dualband action, wherein the spectral response of the diode was switched between extended midwave (~ 8 micron cutoff) and longwave (~ 10 micron cutoff) infrared by the polarity of the voltage bias applied across it. In Phase II we will improve quantum efficiency in each band, minimize spectral crosstalk, fabricate 640x512 focal plane arrays with high uniformity and pixel operability, and integrate and deliver a compact portable camera with a pluggable sensor cartridge. The plug-and-play camera will enable DOD to field-test this new dualband sensor technology for missile defense applications.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Army | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 528.65K | Year: 2015

QmagiQ and MIT-LL will partner to develop a high-performance very longwave infrared digital focal plane array (VLWIR DFPA) suitable for hyperspectral imaging applications. The DFPA will be based on Type-II antimony-based strained layer superlattice (SLS) photodiodes with > 13 micron cutoff, hybridized to a digital readout integrated circuit (DROIC). In Phase I, we investigated the performance of a set of SLS FPAs with the cutoff wavelength systematically shifted from ~ 10 microns to ~ 16 microns. In Phase II, we will build on this effort to maximize quantum efficiency at the longest wavelengths and exploit the DROIC's unique ability to handle large dark current while delivering great signal-to-noise. The resulting sensor will be particularly useful in an infrared hyperspectral imaging system for the stand-off detection of homemade explosives.

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