Al Qasemi Research Center

Baqa, Israel

Al Qasemi Research Center

Baqa, Israel
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Pakkianathan B.C.,Israel Agricultural Research Organization | Kontsedalov S.,Israel Agricultural Research Organization | Lebedev G.,Israel Agricultural Research Organization | Mahadav A.,Hebrew University of Jerusalem | And 3 more authors.
Journal of Virology | Year: 2015

Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) is a begomovirus transmitted exclusively by the whitefly Bemisia tabaci in a persistent, circulative manner. Replication of TYLCV in its vector remains controversial, and thus far, the virus has been considered to be nonpropagative. Following 8 h of acquisition on TYLCV-infected tomato plants or purified virions and then transfer to non- TYLCV-host cotton plants, the amounts of virus inside whitefly adults significantly increased (>2-fold) during the first few days and then continuously decreased, as measured by the amounts of genes on both virus DNA strands. Reported alterations in insect immune and defense responses upon virus retention led us to hypothesize a role for the immune response in suppressing virus replication. After virus acquisition, stress conditions were imposed on whiteflies, and the levels of three viral gene sequences were measured over time. When whiteflies were exposed to TYLCV and treatment with two different pesticides, the virus levels continuously increased. Upon exposure to heat stress, the virus levels gradually decreased, without any initial accumulation. Switching of whiteflies between pesticide, heat stress, and control treatments caused fluctuating increases and decreases in virus levels. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis confirmed these results and showed virus signals inside midgut epithelial cell nuclei. Combining the pesticide and heat treatments with virus acquisition had significant effects on fecundity. Altogether, our results demonstrate for the first time that a single-stranded DNA plant virus can replicate in its hemipteran vector. © 2015, American Society for Microbiology.


Shamni O.,Hebrew University of Jerusalem | Cohen G.,The Skin Research Institute | Cohen G.,Hebrew University of Jerusalem | Gruzman A.,Bar - Ilan University | And 6 more authors.
Biochimica et Biophysica Acta - Biomembranes | Year: 2017

The rate of glucose influx to skeletal muscles is determined primarily by the number of functional units of glucose transporter-4 (GLUT4) in the myotube plasma membrane. The abundance of GLUT4 in the plasma membrane is tightly regulated by insulin or contractile activity, which employ distinct pathways to translocate GLUT4-rich vesicles from intracellular compartments. Various studies have indicated that GLUT4 intrinsic activity is also regulated by conformational changes and/or interactions with membrane components and intracellular proteins in the vicinity of the plasma membrane. Here we show that the non-metabolizable glucose analog 3-O-methyl-D-glucose (MeGlc) augmented the rate of hexose transport into myotubes by increasing GLUT4 intrinsic activity without altering the content of the transporter in the plasma membrane. This effect was not a consequence of ATP depletion or hyperosmolar stress and did not involve Akt/PKB or AMPK signal transduction pathways. MeGlc reduced the inhibitory potency (increased Ki) of indinavir, a selective inhibitor of GLUT4, in a dose-dependent manner. Kinetic analyses indicate that MeGlc induced changes in GLUT4 or GLUT4 complexes within the plasma membrane, which enhanced the hexose transport activity and reduced the potency of indinavir inhibition. Finally, we present a simple kinetic analysis for screening and discovering low molecular weight compounds that augment GLUT4 activity. © 2017 Elsevier B.V.


PubMed | Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Tel Aviv University, Al Qasemi Research Center and Al - Balqa Applied University
Type: | Journal: Scientific reports | Year: 2016

Cultured tomatoes are often exposed to a combination of extreme heat and infection with Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV). This stress combination leads to intense disease symptoms and yield losses. The response of TYLCV-susceptible and resistant tomatoes to heat stress together with viral infection was compared. The plant heat-stress response was undermined in TYLCV infected plants. The decline correlated with the down-regulation of heat shock transcription factors (HSFs) HSFA2 and HSFB1, and consequently, of HSF-regulated genes Hsp17, Apx1, Apx2 and Hsp90. We proposed that the weakened heat stress response was due to the decreased capacity of HSFA2 to translocate into the nuclei of infected cells. All the six TYLCV proteins were able to interact with tomato HSFA2 in vitro, moreover, coat protein developed complexes with HSFA2 in nuclei. Capturing of HSFA2 by viral proteins could suppress the transcriptional activation of heat stress response genes. Application of both heat and TYLCV stresses was accompanied by the development of intracellular large protein aggregates containing TYLCV proteins and DNA. The maintenance of cellular chaperones in the aggregated state, even after recovery from heat stress, prevents the circulation of free soluble chaperones, causing an additional decrease in stress response efficiency.

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