Vancouver, Canada
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Patent
Pulse Energy | Date: 2011-12-28

A system and method for predictive modeling of building energy consumption provides predicted building energy load values which are determined using kernel smoothing of historical building energy load values for a building using defined scaling factors for scaling predictor variables associated with building energy consumption. Predictor variables may include temperature, humidity, windspeed or direction, occupancy, time, day, date, and solar radiation. Scaling factor values may be defined by optimization training using historical building energy load values and measured predictor variable values for a building. Predicted and measured building energy load values are compared to determine if a preset difference threshold has been exceeded, in which case an alert signal or message is generated and transmitted to electronically and/or physically signal a user. The building energy monitoring system may be integrated with a building automation system, or may be operated as a separate system receiving building energy and predictor variable values.


News Article | January 22, 2010
Site: www.cnet.com

While people are watching the Olympic Games, building managers will be watching their energy dashboards. Energy management software company Pulse Energy on Friday showed off an energy-monitoring system developed to make the Olympic Games in Vancouver more efficient. The software gives facilities managers a real-time readout of energy consumption at different venues. By tracking that data, building managers can make adjustments to save energy, such as turning off equipment that's not in use. The information is also available online at VenueEnergyTracker.com. The reporting system presents how much energy use and greenhouse gas emissions were avoided by the steps Olympic Game organizers have already taken, according to Pulse Energy. Building managers at the seven venues can compare how they stack up against other buildings. Pulse Energy says its software, which is used by businesses and other organizations, can save between 5 and 25 percent annually on energy bills.


News Article | September 9, 2010
Site: www.zdnet.com

There are probably more than a dozen cities that I know of competing to be known as the world's greenest or more energy-efficient or cleanest. I don't really care which one of them wins, because any focus on recalibrating community programs and development with an eye toward being kinder to the earth is a good thing in my mind. Understandably, the high-tech companies focused most on green tech -- notably Cisco and IBM -- have been rallying around these communities with the hope that their tools for better energy management, water conservation, smart transportation and such are the ones adopted by some of the highest profile projects. So, in that spirit, chalk one up for Cisco, which has cozied up to Canada's fair city of Vancouver, which has a declared goal of becoming the greenest city in the world by 2020. Cisco, along with Pulse Energy, are about to start working on several different green tech pilot projects in Vancouver, including an initiative to improve energy efficiency in commercial and government buildings, an effort to provide residents with home energy management technologies, and a plan to build out a green data center at the University of British Columbia. The parties involved are still working through who will lead what when it comes to pilot project accountability. Or, frankly, what it will cost. But you can bet this will be high-profile as things unfold.


The Pacific Gas & Electric Company and energy consultant firm PECI have partnered with Vancouver software startup Pulse Energy to jointly implement a technology assessment focused on boosting the energy performance of medium-sized commercial buildings. The assessment is designed to help building owners and operators save energy, cut costs and improve comfort in their facilities. Thirty buildings in the San Francisco Bay Area will initially participate. PG&E is testing an innovative approach aimed at streamlining the delivery of energy savings measures using PulseTM Energy Manager Software and PECI’s building efficiency expertise. Once deployed, PECI engineers can use the software’s detailed energy performance analysis to benchmark building performance, provide recommendations on energy efficiency improvements and best practices, and calculate the impact of completed upgrades on the building’s energy performance. “PECI has conducted extensive research on monitoring systems and identified Pulse Energy as a proven technology platform with promise for tackling deeper, whole building energy savings,” said Hannah Friedman, PECI’s Director of Technical Research. “Our goal with this assessment is to demonstrate how technology can support actions based on better energy information, which could be game changing for large scale energy efficiency programs.” “Our software equips customers with a deep level of building performance insight that, layered with PECI’s commissioning expertise, provides a powerful, whole building approach for managing and reducing energy consumption," David Helliwell, Pulse Energy’s co-founder and CEO, added. "We’re looking forward to seeing the significant benefits of applying this approach for these California customers.” Vancouver's Pulse Energy helps utilities to achieve regulated efficiency targets and boost customer satisfaction through the Pulse Platform, a scalable software solution for commercial buildings that delivers insight to improve performance, engages occupants, and measures and verifies energy performance.


News Article | September 16, 2013
Site: www.techvibes.com

Vancouver's Pulse Energy announced today what could be the next evolution of energy efficiency in California. Working in collaboration with Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E), Pulse Energy will launch an emerging technologies pilot called Business Energy Reports. The focus of this pilot is to help the utility’s small and medium business (SMB) customers reduce energy waste by giving them new insight into their energy consumption, according to the company. The Business Energy Reports pilot will mail targeted energy insights to 15,000 SMBs this fall. The analysis is provided by Pulse Check, energy software built specifically for the needs of SMBs, grounded in behavioural research into how such organizations can optimize their operations. Every customer in the PG&E pilot will receive a report customized for their business, with customized recommendations relevant to their usage and industry, Pulse says. PG&E’s business customers will join Pulse Check users at utilities across North America and Europe.


News Article | April 16, 2012
Site: www.techvibes.com

Vancouver's In Motion Technology announced the appointment of Dean Rockwell as Chief Executive Officer today.  Rockwell will be responsible for the company’s strategic direction and business operations, and brings more than two decades of international leadership to the In Motion Technology team. Rockwell is an experienced leader of technology-intensive businesses and has a solid track record with over 24 years of experience. Most recently, Rockwell was the COO of Pulse Energy. However, the greater tech community will better know his name for his time as the CEO of the British Columbia Innovation Council. “We’re very pleased to have Dean aboard, and are confident that his wealth of experience and leadership skills in high-growth technology ventures will enable In Motion Technology to continue on its current high-growth trajectory as a leader in mobile enterprise networking,” said Greg Peet, Chair of In Motion Technology. “I am pleased to be joining the In Motion Technology team and see tremendous opportunities ahead, particularly with the revolution taking place with both wireless networks and devices that organizations want to deploy in their fleets,” said Rockwell. In Motion Technology is a leader in mobile networking systems that provide organizations with secure, manageable end-to-end communications, serving all systems in and around the vehicle using multiple broadband networks.


The City of Vancouver, Cisco, and Vancouver-based Pulse Energy have inked a deal to bring green tech and energy management tools to Vancouver city buildings and homes in the near future. I had a chance to chat with City Councilor Andrea Reimer about what the deal means for people and, frankly, I’m excited about the program. Andrea told me that there is a five-pronged approach to this initiative that will first bring smart metering to city buildings, then to homeowners (get me on that list!), green data centres, data analysis by the University of British Columbia, a living lab showcasing local technologies, and finally connecting in with Urban Eco Map. All together this means we’ll have more information and understand of how we use energy and where we can save energy. Did you know that you can achieve a 4-15% reduction in energy use (therefore cost) just by knowing about your energy use? So applied to city buildings, the first phase, this could save taxpayers a good chunk of change. When you apply this to homeowners, imagine what you can save by eliminating and managing “vampire devices” in your home. In the homeowner phase, Cisco and Pulse will be supplying their technologies for free to help both test the devices in the real world and provide data for UBC’s analysis of power use. Yeah, sign me up for that! I’m game! The data from this project will help feed into the Urban Eco Map (currently Amsterdam and San Francisco are the only cities in the map) which will allow people to understand their city’s even their neighborhood’s energy use. Maybe your neighborhood is great at saving electricity, but your carbon footprint is high because of driving, you could look at similar areas that have lower carbon footprints and see what they are doing (or just move there). Andrea said that this initiative ties in nicely with both Vancouver’s Open Data project and the Greenest City 2020 plan, but some might cry fowl because most of our electricity use (for example) is generated by hydro power (so little carbon impact). What would reducing electricity use do for climate change? Andrea took this head on noting that by reducing the energy use now, we stave off having to build more dams and plants in the future, which would save both money and conserve land. From the Cisco press release, here are the highlights and goals: The bottom line for me, and what I think people should be excited about, is that the city is first going to be more proactive about trying to save energy. City buildings and data centres are huge energy sucks, anything we can do to help reduce that will save money. Leading the way, then bringing homeowners/renters into the picture is a great way to get green tech accepted and in use. When the Living Lab opens, you can bet I’ll be there to show you the cool stuff that will be showcased (cause I think all of this stuff is cool).


In April, Vancouver-based Pulse Energy announced a multi-million dollar, three-year contract with British Gas, the United Kingdom’s largest energy supplier. The Canadian company is continuing its international growth with its latest overseas customer: Australia’s Ergon Energy. Pulse now services utilities across three continents. Providing business customers with insight into their energy usage through emailed reports and an integrated web portal, Pulse's program for Ergon will offer specific actions that customers can take to increase their energy efficiency and run their businesses better. "This leads to energy savings that improve customers’ overall satisfaction with their utility and contribute to the bottom line, good for every small business owner," Pulse explains. “The customer interest in the Pulse Energy service has been very positive to date,” said Lisa McDonald, Products Manager with Ergon Energy. “The Pulse Platform sets us apart from other energy service providers and the information and detail provided certainly hits the mark with customers.” “It is a great pleasure to be working with Ergon Energy to bring an unparalleled experience to their Small and Medium Enterprise customers,” said David Helliwell, CEO of Pulse Energy. “Both Ergon and their customers have shown a high degree of skill and enthusiasm that give me great confidence that this program will achieve big things in the months ahead.”


Now in its 60th year, ASME Turbo Expo is recognized as the must-attend event for turbomachinery professionals. The technical conference has a well-earned reputation for bringing together the best and brightest experts from around the world to share the latest in turbine technology, research, development, and application in the following topic areas: gas turbines, steam turbines, wind turbines, fans & blowers, Rankine cycle, and supercritical CO2. Turbo Expo offers unrivalled networking opportunities with a dedicated and diverse trade show floor. The 3-day exhibition attracts the industry's leading professionals and key decision makers, whose innovation and expertise are helping to shape the future of the turbomachinery industry and will feature a Student Poster Session. "Maturing efficiency levels in turbomachinery combined with market and legislative pressures to improve performances and reliability, while reducing development costs are straining the limits of the conventional turbomachinery optimization methods” says Prof. Zangeneh, Managing Director of ADT, “3D Inverse Design approaches for turbomachinery optimization can deliver considerable reduction in development costs and times providing an ideal platform for multidisciplinary turbomachinery design and optimization compatible with industrial development standard." ADT’s TURBOdesign Suite application to answer the needs for high performance and high reliability turbomachinery requirements will be featured in a presentation on multidisciplinary optimization of radial and mixed-inflow turbines for improved performances and reliability, “Increasing Pulse Energy recovery of Turbocharger Radial Turbines by 3D inverse design method (GT2015-43579)” will be held during Session: 42-1 Radial Turbines on Wednesday, June 17, 2015 at 14:30 PM-17:30 PM. ADT engineers and representatives will be at Booth 513 to demonstrate the TURBOdesign Suite and show design engineers and turbomachinery manufacturers how to optimize preliminary designs as well as improve knowledge transfer between projects and design teams while significantly reducing design time and attaining higher performance and noise reduction. Registrations for the event are now open for limited places, for more information please visit http://www.adtechnology.co.uk/news/events/adt-event-asme2015 TURBOdesign Suite 5.2.5 in now available, the Suite runs on Windows systems. It operates on mid-range workstations with 2.4 Ghz or better processors, 2 GB RAM and 1Gb disk space. The TURBOdesign Suite is sold in modules starting from $15,000 USD with software training and technical support included. Advanced Design Technology (ADT) is a global leader in the development of advanced turbomachinery design and optimization methods to shorten development times and costs and improve turbomachinery performances. ADT’s aim is to put designers in direct control of the aerodynamic design and to considerably shorten the design time and time to market for a range of turbomachinery products. ADT’s clients, who represent some of the leading global players in the aerospace, automotive, power generation and marine fields, have achieved significant returns on investment in terms of reduction in design times, higher performance and ease of know-how transfer among different design teams and projects. For more information, call +44 (0) 20 7299 1170 or visit http://www.adtechnology.co.uk.

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