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Agache I.,Transylvania University | Bilo M.,Allergy Unit | Braunstahl G.-J.,Pulmonology | Delgado L.,University of Porto | And 9 more authors.
Allergy: European Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology | Year: 2015

The allergen challenge test has been the mainstay of diagnosis of allergic diseases for a long time since it offers a direct proof of the clinical relevance of a particular allergen for the allergic disease symptoms and severity. Standardisation and availability for daily practice (including safety issues) are still to be refined but most of the challenge tests have safely crossed the border from research tools to diagnostic tests available for daily practice for a well trained clinical staff. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.


Tasdemir K.,Cardiovascular Surgery | Oymak S.,Pulmonology | Duran M.,Erciyes University | Oguz F.,Erciyes University
Hemodialysis International | Year: 2010

The aim of this prospective study was to evaluate long-term effects of arteriovenous fistula (AVF) on the development of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) and the relationship between blood flow rate of AVF and pulmonary artery pressure (PAP) in the patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). This prospective study was performed in 20 patients with ESRD. Before an AVF was surgically created for hemodialysis, the patients were evaluated by echocardiography. Then, an AVF was surgically created in all patients. After mean 23.50 ± 2.25 months, the second evaluation was performed by echocardiography. Also, the blood flow rate of AVF was measured at the second echocardiographic evaluation. Pulmonary arterial hypertension was defined as a systolic PAP above 35 mmHg at rest. Mean age of 20 patients with ESRD was 55.05 ± 13.64 years; 11 of 20 patients were males. Pulmonary arterial hypertension was detected in 6 (30%) patients before AVF creation and in 4 (20%) patients after AVF creation. Systolic PAP value was meaningfully lower after AVF creation than before AVF creation (29.95 ± 10.26 mmHg vs. 35.35 ± 7.86 mmHg, respectively, P: 0.047). However, there was no significant difference between 2 time periods in terms of presence of PAH (P>0.05). Pulmonary artery pressure did not correlate with blood flow rate of AVF and duration after AVF creation (P>0.05). In hemodialysis patients, a surgically created AVF has no significant effect on the development of PAH within a long-term period. Similarly, blood flow rate of AVF also did not affect remarkably systolic PAP within the long-term period. © 2010 The Authors. Hemodialysis International © 2010 International Society for Hemodialysis.


New Rochelle, NY, November 17, 2016--A recent study of 577 children living in Puerto Rico shows that residential distance to a major road (a marker of exposure to traffic-related air pollution, or TRAP) is associated with increased plasma levels of interleukin 31 (IL-31), a cytokine that promotes allergic inflammation. This study was published in Pediatric Allergy, Immunology, and Pulmonology, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. The article is available free on the Pediatric Allergy, Immunology, and Pulmonology website until December 17, 2016. In the article "Proximity to a Major Road and Plasma Cytokines in School-Aged Children," Franziska Rosser, MD, MPH, Juan Celedón, MD, DrPH, and coauthors from Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC (PA), University of Puerto Rico (San Juan, PR), and Carnegie Mellon University (Pittsburgh, PA), compared the blood levels of cytokines - signaling chemicals produced by the immune system that can stimulate inflammation - in children with and without asthma. Children living in closer proximity to a major road had higher levels of some cytokines that regulate immune responses and inflammation known to have a role in asthma. "Exposure to traffic-related air pollution has been associated with increased prevalence of new onset asthma in children and exacerbations in children with pre-existing asthma," says Pediatric Allergy, Immunology, and Pulmonology Editor-in-Chief Mary Cataletto, MD, Professor of Clinical Pediatrics, State University of New York at Stony Brook. "Studies focusing on immune response to TRAP may help to explain the mechanisms responsible for higher prevalence rates in genetically susceptible children." Research reported in this publication was supported by the National Institutes of Health under Award Number HL079966, HL117191, and HL125666. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health. Pediatric Allergy, Immunology, and Pulmonology is a quarterly, peer-reviewed journal published online with open access options and in print that synthesizes the pulmonary, allergy, and immunology communities in the advancement of the respiratory health of children. Led by Editor-in-Chief Mary Cataletto, MD, Professor of Clinical Pediatrics, State University of New York at Stony Brook, the Journal provides comprehensive coverage to further the understanding and optimize the treatment of some of the most common and costly chronic illnesses in children. It includes original translational, clinical, and epidemiologic research; public health, quality improvement, and case control studies; patient education research; and the latest research and standards of care for functional and genetic immune deficiencies and interstitial lung diseases. Tables of content and a sample issue may be viewed on the Pediatric Allergy, Immunology, and Pulmonology website. Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers is a privately held, fully integrated media company known for establishing authoritative peer-reviewed journals in many promising areas of science and biomedical research, including Journal of Aerosol Medicine and Pulmonary Drug Delivery, Breastfeeding Medicine, and Population Health Management. Its biotechnology trade magazine, GEN (Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News), was the first in its field and is today the industry's most widely read publication worldwide. A complete list of the firm's 80 journals, books, and newsmagazines is available on the Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers website.


SAN JOSE, CA--(Marketwired - February 20, 2017) - Regional Medical Center of San Jose and Good Samaritan Hospital are proud to announce they are part of the newly branded Good Samaritan Health System (GSHS). Regional and Good Samaritan are both owned by Hospital Corporation of America (HCA), which operates 169 facilities and more than 1-hundred free-standing surgery centers nationwide. The GSHS includes three San Jose HCA-owned surgery centers, five CareNow Urgent Care Centers opening in the San Jose area in 2017, and the physicians associated with Santa Clara County Independent Physician's Association (SCCIPA). "We are part of the same system and the new brand makes it easier for the public to access clinical excellence at any facility within the GSHS," said Mike Johnson, CEO of Regional Medical Center of San Jose. "Our goal is a team approach of physicians, nurses and staff who are committed to the individual's needs, while providing Silicon Valley residents with quality care at our system locations." Each facility and organization under the GSHS umbrella operates independently with their own existing management, though the entities will continue to work together to provide the best health care options for every patient. "The Good Samaritan Health System is outstanding for the San Jose community," said Joe DeSchryver, CEO of Good Samaritan Hospital. "Patients already know that exceptional care is offered at both Good Samaritan Hospital and Regional Medical Center. The facilities' collaborative efforts allow for the best healthcare experience across the region with a focus on quality and safety." Both hospitals have been nationally recognized for their superior care as a Top Performer on Key Quality Measures® by The Joint Commission. The facilities each house a Comprehensive Stroke Center, STEMI receiving center, and accredited Chest Pain Center. Good Samaritan Hospital recently embarked on a $30 million expansion of its Emergency Department, while Regional Medical Center, a Level II Trauma Center, recently completed a $350-million expansion, including a new inpatient tower and Emergency Department renovation. Regional Medical Center of San Jose is a Level II designated and verified Trauma Center staffed by in-house specialists 24/7/365. The hospital provides a host of technologically-advanced services including Cardiovascular, Neuro, Orthopedic, General Surgery, Interventional Pulmonology, along with multi-organ Cancer Care, and services for Women and Children. Regional holds Joint Commission advanced certification as a Comprehensive Stroke Center and a Get with the Guidelines - Stroke Silver Plus Performance Achievement Award from the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association. It is a certified Chest Pain Center, Certified Atrial Fibrillation Program, county-designated STEMI (heart attack) Receiving Center, ACoS accredited Community Cancer Center, designated Lung Cancer Screening Center, a member of Extracorporeal Life Support Organization (ECMO) and is certified by The Joint Commission in Sepsis care. The hospital has also been recognized by The Joint Commission as a top performing hospital. For more information, visit: www.regionalmedicalsanjose.com. Good Samaritan Hospital, a 474-bed acute care hospital in the heart of Silicon Valley, has been delivering elite level care with compassion since 1965. Its two locations include the main campus in San Jose, California and the Mission Oaks campus in Los Gatos, California. Good Samaritan Hospital is recognized nationally for quality and safety by The Joint Commission as a Top Performer on Key Quality Measures® and with the Gold Seal of Approval® for Sepsis Certification, and for Hip and Knee Joint Replacement Certification. Good Samaritan Hospital is a Joint Commission-certified Comprehensive Stroke Center, STEMI Receiving Center, accredited Chest Pain Center, certified Afib Center and a five-time recipient of the American College of Surgeons Outstanding Achievement Award in cancer care. For more information visit, www.goodsamsanjose.com.


AOP Orphan Pharmaceuticals AG (AOP Orphan) and PharmaEssentia Corporation (Taipei Exchange: 6446) announced results from the PROUD-PV study, a pivotal phase III clinical study in Polycythemia Vera (PV) presented at ASH 2016. The PROUD-PV is a phase III, randomized, open-label, multicenter, controlled, parallel arm study assessing the efficacy and safety of ropeginterferon alfa-2b versus HU in patients with Polycythemia Vera. This study is part of the development program to support marketing authorizations of ropeginterferon alfa-2b (AOP2014/P1101) in Europe and in the United States (U.S.). Ropeginterferon alfa-2b, a novel, long-acting, mono-pegylated proline interferon, uniquely administered once every two weeks is expected to be the first interferon approved for PV worldwide, and the only approved first-line treatment for PV in the U.S. In PROUD-PV, a study sponsored and conducted by AOP Orphan, 254 PV patients from 48 centers across Europe were treated either once every two weeks with ropeginterferon alfa-2b or daily with the cytoreductive therapy hydroxyurea (HU). The study included both treatment-naive and HU-pretreated patients with characteristics of an 'early, first-line' PV population. At 12 months, Complete Hematologic Response[1] (CHR) was achieved in a high proportion of patients and non-inferiority was demonstrated (43.1% for ropeginterferon alfa-2b versus 45.6% for HU in the intent-to-treat-population, p=0.0028). The pre-specified primary endpoint, which was a composite of CHR and spleen length normality, was confounded by the fact that the median spleen length was almost normal at baseline and the observed change was not clinically relevant (21.3% for ropeginterferon alfa-2b versus 27.6% for HU in the intent-to-treat-population, p=0.2233). Ropeginterferon alfa-2b showed significantly better tolerability than HU. Overall, 59.6% of the patients in the ropeginterferon alfa-2b arm experienced treatment related adverse events compared to 75.6 % of the patients treated with HU (p<0.05). There was no difference in adverse events of special interest concerning interferons (auto-immune, psychiatric), or concerning PV (cardiovascular disorders). Most importantly, throughout the phase III program (PROUD-PV and CONTINUATION-PV) five related secondary malignancies were observed, all in the HU cohort (two acute leukemias, two basal carcinomas and one melanoma). Professor Heinz Gisslinger from the Medical University of Vienna, presenting the results at ASH said, "We did already know from several smaller studies that interferons can be a valuable treatment option for myeloproliferative diseases, however this is the first and largest prospective controlled trial. This trial confirms the expected efficacy, while the observed safety and tolerability appears superior to previously reported data." Professor Jean-Jacques Kiladjian from the Saint-Louis Hospital & Paris Diderot University in France, added, "The potential to improve progression-free survival holds promise for long-term patient benefit, in line with the unique disease modification capabilities of interferon." Ko-Chung Lin, Ph.D., founder and CEO of PharmaEssentia, added, "The founding cornerstone of PharmaEssentia was to solve the discontinuity of long acting interferon beyond the weekly dosing regimen. We have been able to do this with ropeginterferon alfa-2b. The advantages provided by ropeginterferon alfa-2b as shown by this promising Phase III trial study and in prior studies, along with our state-of-the-art manufacturing facility in Taiwan, collectively bring us closer to making our treatment available to PV patients in the United States. We are proud to discover, develop, manufacture and eventually market ropeginterferon alfa-2b. This is fully in line with our mission to offer efficacious, safe and cost effective therapies for the treatment of myeloproliferative neoplasms such as PV, myelofibrosis, chronic myeloid leukemia, as well as hepatitis and other diseases." "AOP Orphan has continuously invested over many years into development of treatments in the field of MPNs. Our clinical development of ropeginterferon alfa-2b and today's release of the PROUD-PV data mark another milestone in our mission to provide innovative solutions for patients with rare diseases," said Rudolf Widmann, Ph.D. founder and CEO of AOP Orphan. Ropeginterferon alfa-2b is a novel, long-acting, mono-pegylated proline interferon with improved pharmacokinetic properties allowing once every two weeks administration offering improved tolerability and convenience. Ropeginterferon alfa-2b was discovered by PharmaEssentia. Ropeginterferon alfa-2b has Orphan Drug designation in the United States of America and the European Union. PharmaEssentia plans to commercialize ropeginterferon alfa-2b in North and South America, as well as Asia. PharmaEssentia has exclusively licensed the rights to ropeginterferon alfa-2b to AOP Orphan for European, Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS), and Middle Eastern markets for the development and commercialization in the field of Myeloproliferative Neoplasms (MPNs). Polycythemia Vera (PV) is a cancer of the blood-building cells in the bone marrow resulting in a chronic increase of red blood cells, white blood cells and platelets. This condition may result in circulatory disorders such as thrombosis and embolism, as well as malignant transformation to myelofibrosis or leukemia. AOP Orphan is a multinational company with headquarters in Vienna, Austria focusing on clinical research, development and distribution of medicines for rare and complex diseases. The company also provides individualized and customized services to meet and accommodate the needs of physicians and patients across Central Europe, the Middle East & Asia. Currently AOP Orphan is concentrating on orphan and complex diseases in Hematology & Oncology, Cardiology & Pulmonology, and CNS & Gastroenterology. PharmaEssentia Corporation (Taipei Exchange:6446) is a global biopharmaceutical company delivering efficacious, safe and cost-effective therapeutic products for the treatment of human diseases while aiming to bring long lasting value to stakeholders. PharmaEssentia was founded in 2003 by a group of Taiwanese-American executives and high-ranking scientists from leading U.S. biotechnology and pharmaceutical companies in order to develop treatments for myeloproliferative neoplasms, hepatitis and other diseases. The company is committed to the improvement of health and quality of life for patients suffering from these diseases. The Company's world-class cGMP biologics facility in Taichung is certified by the Taiwan Food and Drug Administration (TFDA) and is designed and operated to be compliant with all U.S. FDA and EMA requirements.


News Article | October 26, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

New Rochelle, NY, October 25, 2016 - Drug taking at high altitude is variably intended to enhance performance, prevent or alleviate the debilitating effects of altitude, or for pleasurable use. In some cases, certain drugs can be advantageous and even life-saving, but many drugs lack evidence of benefit and carry risks of side effects or interactions. The International Climbing and Mountaineering Federation (UIAA) has published evidence-based guidelines advising on the safe use of alcohol, steroids, oxygen, erythropoietin, and many other types of drugs in mountain environments in an article in High Altitude Medicine & Biology, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. The article is available free online on the High Altitude Medicine & Biology website. An international team of researchers from Kuwait, Austria, United Kingdom, Germany, Switzerland, Nepal, Spain, France, and the Netherlands, led by David Hillebrandt, MB, BS, President, UIAA Medical Commission, coauthored the article entitled "Drug Use and Misuse in the Mountains. An UIAA MedCom-Consensus Guide for Medical Professionals." They conducted an extensive review of the medical literature, trials, observational studies, and case series to assess the evidence available for drugs commonly used by mountain climbers. Their conclusions and recommendations cover a broad range of drug types including alcohol, anabolic agents such as androgenic steroids, adrenergic agonists, beta-blocking agents, erythropoietin, oxygen, glucocorticosteroids, benzodiazepines, and stimulants such as amphetamines. "The use of drugs beyond those proven effective in preventing and treating high altitude illnesses remains very controversial among both physicians and climbers," says Erik R. Swenson, MD, Editor-in-Chief of High Altitude Medicine & Biology and Professor, Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Veterans Administration Puget Sound Healthcare System. "This broad and comprehensive review of the myriad drugs used for various purposes in climbing will be useful to all concerned in decision-making about their use, determining the level of supportive evidence, and importantly their potential costs and adverse effects." High Altitude Medicine & Biology, the Official Journal of the International Society for Mountain Medicine, is published quarterly online. It is the only peer-reviewed journal dedicated exclusively to the latest advances in high altitude life sciences. The journal presents findings on the effects of chronic hypoxia on lung and heart disease, pulmonary and cerebral edema, hypertension, dehydration, infertility, appetite and weight loss, and other diseases. Complete tables of content and sample issue may be viewed online at the High Altitude Medicine & Biology website. Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers is a privately held, fully integrated media company known for establishing authoritative peer-reviewed journals in many promising areas of science and biomedical research, including Journal of Aerosol Medicine and Pulmonary Drug Delivery, and Pediatric Allergy, Immunology, and Pulmonology. Its biotechnology trade magazine, GEN (Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News), was the first in its field and is today the industry's most widely read publication worldwide. A complete list of the firm's 80 journals, books, and newsmagazines is available at the Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers website.


News Article | December 14, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

New Rochelle, NY, December 14, 2016 -The ethics of using medications to improve performance and increase the likelihood of success in high-altitude climbing remains a controversial topic, and a new study that asked climbers of Mount Everest their opinions and assessed their use of medications and oxygen provides new insights in an article published in High Altitude Medicine & Biology, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. The article is available free online on the High Altitude Medicine & Biology website until January 11, 2017. The article "Medication Use Among Mount Everest Climbers: Practice and Attitudes" is coauthored by Andrew Luks, MD, University of Washington, Seattle, Colin Grissom, MD, Intermountain Medical Center and the University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Luanne Freer, MD, Yellowstone National Park, Bozeman, MT and Himalayan Rescue Association Everest Base Camp Medical Clinic, Nepal, and Peter Hackett, MD, University of Colorado, Denver, and Institute for Altitude Medicine, Telluride, CO. The researchers report that less than half of the climbers surveyed reported using medications on climbs. The most commonly used medication was acetazolamide to prevent altitude sickness. "This article by Luks et al. and another recent article by a group on Mt Blanc in the French Alps, in which drug levels were measured in urine collected from a common toilet used by many climbers on the way to the summit, give independent and confirmatory data that drug use by mountaineers is mostly and appropriately for altitude illness prophylaxis and sleep quality, and not for performance enhancement or recreational pleasure," says Erik R. Swenson, MD, Editor-in-Chief of High Altitude Medicine & Biology and Professor, Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Veterans Administration Puget Sound Healthcare System. "Rumors of rampant drug abuse appear to be disproven." High Altitude Medicine & Biology, the Official Journal of the International Society for Mountain Medicine, is published quarterly online. It is the only peer-reviewed journal dedicated exclusively to the latest advances in high altitude life sciences. The journal presents findings on the effects of chronic hypoxia on lung and heart disease, pulmonary and cerebral edema, hypertension, dehydration, infertility, appetite and weight loss, and other diseases. Complete tables of content and sample issue may be viewed online at the High Altitude Medicine & Biology website. Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers is a privately held, fully integrated media company known for establishing authoritative peer-reviewed journals in many promising areas of science and biomedical research, including Journal of Aerosol Medicine and Pulmonary Drug Delivery, and Pediatric Allergy, Immunology, and Pulmonology. Its biotechnology trade magazine, GEN (Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News), was the first in its field and is today the industry's most widely read publication worldwide. A complete list of the firm's 80 journals, books, and newsmagazines is available at the Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers website.


News Article | December 16, 2016
Site: globenewswire.com

KANSAS CITY, Mo. and KANSAS CITY, Kan., Dec. 16, 2016 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- The Unified Government of Wyandotte County and Kansas City, Kansas (UG), in collaboration with Cerner, a global leader in health care technology and The University of Kansas Hospital (KU) today announced the opening of the Road to Wellness Health Center. The 5,000-square-foot health center is part of UG’s long-term strategy to improve the health of its county and city employees and provide convenient, affordable care. UG employees will have access to a variety of health and care services that are part of UG’s new Road to Wellness employee wellness program. Cerner’s management of the health center will include primary care, health education through coaching, and prevention and wellness screening services centered on the preferences and risks of each plan member. The health program launched in October 2015 with the availability of wellness screenings and health coaching services provided by Cerner for UG employees. “Our new employee health center marks a big step toward promoting improved health and wellness among our employees. Not only will this service give our employees an incentive to take more preventive health measures, but we believe it will also help the Unified Government control its health care costs,” says Mark Holland, mayor and CEO of UG. “The health center is also an opportunity to strengthen our relationship with Cerner and the University of Kansas Hospital. I’m grateful for their support and participation.” Members are able to interact with their providers, review their medical records and schedule appointments using Cerner’s secure, online portal. The health center offers an array of wellness services designed to assist members in managing and preventing illness. Programming also includes preventive activities such as vaccinations, education and coaching on smoking cessation and preventive blood pressure, as well as skin cancer screenings. “We are excited to support the Unified Government and the University of Kansas Hospital in UG’s Road to Wellness employee program,” said Mike Heckman, VP of population health services with Cerner. “We share a vision to provide affordable, convenient and high quality health and care services to employees and their families. Cerner is eager to advance this important initiative that aims to make a positive impact on the overall health of our local community.” The Road to Wellness Health Center is the eighth on-site health center that Cerner has opened in the Kansas City metropolitan area and one of more than 40 operated by Cerner throughout the country. The health centers pair technology with high quality clinical services designed to manage the health of workforces and families. Cerner’s care teams will use state-of-the-art technologies, including Cerner’s population health platform, HealtheIntentSM, to help providers deliver the right care at the right time. KU, a leading health provider of comprehensive services for work-related injuries, will provide physician oversite for all occupational medicine programs and services for UG employees. “Joining the Unified Government with the area’s top-ranked health system and a global leader in health care, Cerner, just makes sense,” said Chris Hansen, SVP for Ambulatory Services and CIO, KU. “Our physicians and other caregivers are excited about this announcement and want to see it achieve great things for the UG.” About UG Kansas City, Kansas is the third largest city in the state of Kansas and is the county seat of Wyandotte County. The city was incorporated in 1886 and for 73 years was governed by a three-member elected Board of Commissioners. In August of 1982, the city held an election and voters approved a change in the form of city government. Under the Charter Ordinance No. 84 the city changed to a seven-member, Mayor-Council-Administrator for of government in April, 1983. On April 1, 1997, voters unanimously approved to consolidate the governments of the City of Kansas City, Kansas (the “City”) and Wyandotte County, Kansas (the “County”), into one jurisdiction; The Unified Government of Wyandotte County/Kansas City, Kansas effective October 1, 1997. The Unified Government, with a 2010 Wyandotte County population of 157,505, covers 155.7 square miles. About Cerner Cerner’s health information technologies connect people, information and systems at more than 25,000 provider facilities worldwide. Recognized for innovation, Cerner solutions assist clinicians in making care decisions and enable organizations to manage the health of populations. The company also offers an integrated clinical and financial system to help health care organizations manage revenue, as well as a wide range of services to support clients’ clinical, financial and operational needs. Cerner’s mission is to contribute to the systemic improvement of health care delivery and the health of communities. Nasdaq:CERN. For more information about Cerner, visit cerner.com, read our blog at blogs.cerner.com, connect with us on Twitter at twitter.com/cerner and on Facebook at facebook.com/cerner. Our website, blog, Twitter account and Facebook page contain a significant amount of information about Cerner, including financial and other information for investors. About The University of Kansas The University of Kansas Hospital is the region's premier academic medical center, providing a full range of care. The hospital is affiliated with the University of Kansas Schools of Medicine, Nursing and Health Professions, and their various leading-edge research projects. The constantly growing facility contains 756 staffed beds (plus 24 bassinets) and serves more than 33,000 inpatients annually. Eleven of its medical and surgical specialty areas are ranked nationally by the U.S. News & World Report “Best Hospital” lists, including Cancer (#25), Cardiology & Heart Surgery (#38 tie), Diabetes & Endocrinology (#33), Ear, Nose & Throat (#31), Gastroenterology and GI Surgery (#35), Geriatrics (#13), Gynecology (#38), Neurology & Neurosurgery (#22), Orthopedics (#35), Pulmonology (#28) and Urology (#17). The cancer program is part of The University of Kansas Cancer Center, one of 69 National Cancer Institute-designated programs in the U.S. The hospital has received Magnet nursing designation three times in a row, reflecting the quality of care throughout the hospital, an honor awarded three consecutive times to only 3.7 percent of the hospitals nationwide. The hospital also houses the region's only accredited burn center, the area's only nationally accredited Level I Trauma Center and the area’s first Advanced Comprehensive Stroke Center recognized by The Joint Commission. For more information, visit kumed.com. The University of Kansas Hospital receives no state appropriations and is financed through operating revenue, bonding authority and philanthropy.


Swidsinski A.,Humboldt University of Berlin | Swidsinski A.,Charité - Medical University of Berlin | Dorffel Y.,Charité - Medical University of Berlin | Loening-Baucke V.,Humboldt University of Berlin | And 9 more authors.
Gut | Year: 2011

Background: Acute appendicitis is a local intestinal inflammation with unclear origin. The aim was to test whether bacteria in appendicitis differ in composition to bacteria found in caecal biopsies from healthy and disease controls. Methods and patients: We investigated sections of 70 appendices using rRNA-based fluorescence in situ hybridisation. Four hundred caecal biopsies and 400 faecal samples from patients with inflammatory bowel disease and other conditions were used as controls. A set of 73 group-specific bacterial probes was applied for the study. Results: The mucosal surface in catarrhal appendicitis showed characteristic lesions of single epithelial cells filled with a mixed bacterial population ('pinned cells') without ulceration of the surroundings. Bacteria deeply infiltrated the tissue in suppurative appendicitis. Fusobacteria (mainly Fusobacterium nucleatum and necrophorum) were a specific component of these epithelial and submucosal infiltrates in 62% of patients with proven appendicitis. The presence of Fusobacteria in mucosal lesions correlated positively with the severity of the appendicitis and was completely absent in caecal biopsies from healthy and disease controls. Main faecal microbiota represented by Bacteroides, Eubacterium rectale (Clostridium group XIVa), Faecalibacterium prausnitzii groups and Akkermansia muciniphila were inversely related to the severity of the disease. The occurrence of other bacterial groups within mucosal lesions of acute appendicitis was not related to the severity of the appendicitis. No Fusobacteria were found in rectal swabs of patients with acute appendicitis. Conclusions: Local infection with Fusobacterium nucleatum/necrophorum is responsible for the majority of cases of acute appendicitis.


Haubner B.J.,Austrian Academy of Sciences | Schneider J.,Pulmonology | Schweigmann U.,Pulmonology | Schuetz T.,Innsbruck Medical University | And 4 more authors.
Circulation Research | Year: 2016

Rationale: Cardiac remodeling and subsequent heart failure remain critical issues after myocardial infarction despite improved treatment and reperfusion strategies. Recently, cardiac regeneration has been demonstrated in fish and newborn mice after apex resection or cardiac infarctions. Two key issues remain to translate findings in model organisms to future therapies in humans: what is the mechanism and can cardiac regeneration indeed occur in newborn humans? Objective: To assess whether human neonatal hearts can functionally recover after myocardial infarction. Methods and Results: Here, we report the case of a newborn child having a severe myocardial infarction due to coronary artery occlusion. The child developed massive cardiac damage as defined by serum markers for cardiomyocyte cell death, electrocardiograms, echocardiography, and cardiac angiography. Remarkably, within weeks after the initial ischemic insult, we observed functional cardiac recovery, which translated into long-term normal heart function. Conclusions: These data indicate that, similar to neonatal rodents, newborn humans might have the intrinsic capacity to repair myocardial damage and completely recover cardiac function. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

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