Liverpool, United Kingdom
Liverpool, United Kingdom

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Gordon S.B.,Pulmonary Immunology | Gordon S.B.,Wellcome Trust Research Laboratory | Jagoe R.T.,University of Liverpool | Jarman E.R.,Wellcome Trust Research Laboratory | And 10 more authors.
Clinical and Vaccine Immunology | Year: 2013

We tested the hypothesis that HIV infection results in activation of alveolar macrophages and that this might be associated with impaired defense against pneumococcus. We compared alveolar macrophages and lymphocytes in 131 bronchoalveolar lavage samples from HIV-infected and healthy controls using inflammatory gene microarrays, flow cytometry, real-time PCR, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to determine the pattern of macrophage activation associated with HIV infection and the effect of this activation on defense against pneumococcus. We used gamma interferon (IFN-γ) priming to mimic the cellular milieu in HIV-infected lungs. InnateDB and BioLayout 3D were used to analyze the interactions of the upregulated genes. Alveolar macrophages from HIV-infected adults showed increased gene expression and cytokine production in a classical pattern. Bronchoalveolar lavage from HIV-infected subjects showed excess CD8+ lymphocytes with activated phenotype. Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) expression was increased in macrophages from HIV-infected subjects, but function was similar between the groups; lung lavage fluid did not inhibit TLR function in transfected HeLa cells. Alveolar macrophages from HIV-infected subjects showed normal binding and internalization of opsonized pneumococci, with or without IFN-γ priming. Alveolar macrophages from HIV-infected subjects showed classical activation compared to that of healthy controls, but this does not alter macrophage interactions with pneumococci. Copyright © 2013, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.


We tested the hypothesis that HIV infection results in activation of alveolar macrophages and that this might be associated with impaired defense against pneumococcus. We compared alveolar macrophages and lymphocytes in 131 bronchoalveolar lavage samples from HIV-infected and healthy controls using inflammatory gene microarrays, flow cytometry, real-time PCR, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to determine the pattern of macrophage activation associated with HIV infection and the effect of this activation on defense against pneumococcus. We used gamma interferon (IFN-γ) priming to mimic the cellular milieu in HIV-infected lungs. InnateDB and BioLayout 3D were used to analyze the interactions of the upregulated genes. Alveolar macrophages from HIV-infected adults showed increased gene expression and cytokine production in a classical pattern. Bronchoalveolar lavage from HIV-infected subjects showed excess CD8(+) lymphocytes with activated phenotype. Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) expression was increased in macrophages from HIV-infected subjects, but function was similar between the groups; lung lavage fluid did not inhibit TLR function in transfected HeLa cells. Alveolar macrophages from HIV-infected subjects showed normal binding and internalization of opsonized pneumococci, with or without IFN-γ priming. Alveolar macrophages from HIV-infected subjects showed classical activation compared to that of healthy controls, but this does not alter macrophage interactions with pneumococci.


Hyams C.,University College London | Tam J.C.H.,Pulmonary Immunology | Brown J.S.,University College London | Gordon S.B.,Pulmonary Immunology
PLoS ONE | Year: 2010

Streptococcus pneumoniae is a common cause of infection in both HIV positive patients and those with complement deficiencies. We hypothesised that HIV positive individuals might exhibit reduced opsonisation of pneumococcus with complement due to reduced levels of S. pneumoniae specific IgG. We discovered no difference in C3 deposition on S. pneumoniae between HIV positive or negative individuals, and furthermore C3 deposition remained unchanged as HIV progressed towards AIDS. We found no correlation between C3 deposition on S. pneumoniae and CD4 cell count in HIV infected individuals. Hence we have demonstrated no failure of complement immunity in HIV positive patients. © 2010 Hyams et al.

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