Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine

Peachtree City, GA, United States

Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine

Peachtree City, GA, United States

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Alveolar Macrophages treated with JBT-101 demonstrated reduced levels of key pro-inflammatory cytokines, TNF- alpha and IL-6 NORWOOD, MA--(Marketwired - February 23, 2017) - Corbus Pharmaceuticals Holdings, Inc. ( : CRBP) ("Corbus" or the "Company"), a clinical stage drug development company targeting rare, chronic, serious inflammatory and fibrotic diseases, announced today that Michael Knowles, M.D., a member of the Company's Scientific Advisory Board and Professor of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, University of North Carolina Chapel Hill will present findings demonstrating positive effects of JBT-101 on reducing inflammatory mediators in alveolar macrophages isolated from excised lungs of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. The presentation will be on March 13, 2017, in New York City, at the Research and Development Day hosted by Corbus. Normally, alveolar macrophages play an important role in lung host defense, secreting inflammatory mediators in healthy subjects in response to microbial infection. However, such macrophages from CF patients exhibit an exaggerated and persistent state of hyper-inflammation that has long-term consequences of irreversible damage to the lung and contributes to the serious morbidity and decreased life-span associated with CF. Dr. Knowles will present experimental preclinical data from human alveolar macrophages treated with JBT-101 that have been isolated from excised lungs of individuals with CF undergoing lung transplantation. To mimic infection, the patient's macrophages were stimulated ex-vivo with lipopolysaccharide derived from P. aeruginosa, which is a major bacterial pathogen in CF, and cultured with and without JBT-101. Macrophages treated with JBT-101 demonstrated a reduced production of two important pro-inflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor alpha and interleukin-6) compared to stimulated macrophages untreated by JBT-101. These pro-inflammatory mediators have been previously shown to be abnormally over-expressed by CF alveolar macrophages at both basal and LPS-stimulated conditions compared to macrophages from healthy donors. "These results are encouraging with respect to the potential of JBT-101 to modify inflammation in the lungs of CF patients, which offers an entirely novel approach to treat all genotypes of this chronic life-shortening disease," said Dr. Knowles. "This human model has allowed us to explore the impact of JBT-101 on immune function of primary cells derived from CF patients' lungs. The data demonstrate JBT-101's unique mechanism of action that could help address chronic lung inflammation in CF patients potentially without the immunosuppression risk associated with existing anti-inflammatory therapies that render them inappropriate for usage in this disease," stated Mark A. Tepper PhD, President and Chief Scientific Officer of Corbus. "We look forward to our upcoming Phase 2 clinical data of JBT-101 in CF patients for further insight into this potential benefit." Interested parties may access a live video webcast and accompanying slide presentation on the Events page of the Investors section of the Company's website at www.CorbusPharma.com. The webcast will be accessible for 90 days following the event. Cystic Fibrosis ("CF") is a chronic, life-threatening, genetic disease caused by inheriting two dysfunctional CFTR genes that normally regulate salt and water movement across cells in the respiratory and digestive systems. CF affects approximately 30,000 patients in the U.S and 75,000 patients worldwide. People with CF have thick, sticky mucus that clogs their airways, with recurrent bacterial infections and chronic inflammation in their lungs. In the gastrointestinal tract, they also have mucus accumulation, bacterial overgrowth, and inflammation. The dysfunctional CFTR genes cause an exaggerated inflammatory response that compounds the damage from a coexisting infection in the lungs and gut. CF results in destruction of lung tissue, lung fibrosis, pancreatic insufficiency, CF-related diabetes, malabsorption, malnutrition, growth retardation, and liver disease, including cirrhosis. The harmful inflammation and accompanying fibrosis in CF damages multiple organs, impairs organ function, reduces health-related quality of life, and can lead to death. JBT-101 is a novel synthetic oral endocannabinoid-mimetic drug that preferentially binds to the cannabinoid receptor type 2 (CB2) expressed on activated immune cells and fibroblasts. CB2 activation triggers endogenous pathways that resolve inflammation and halt fibrosis. Preclinical and Phase 1 studies have shown JBT-101 to have a favorable safety, tolerability and pharmacokinetic profile. It has also demonstrated promising potency in preclinical models of inflammation and fibrosis. JBT-101 is designed to trigger the production of "Specialized Pro-resolving Lipid Mediators" that activate an endogenous cascade responsible for the resolution of inflammation and fibrosis, while reducing production of multiple inflammatory mediators. In effect, JBT-101 triggers endogenous pathways to turn "off" chronic inflammation and fibrotic processes, without causing immunosuppression. Corbus Pharmaceuticals Holdings, Inc. is a clinical stage pharmaceutical company focused on the development and commercialization of novel therapeutics to treat rare, chronic, and serious inflammatory and fibrotic diseases. The Company's lead product candidate, JBT-101, is a novel synthetic oral endocannabinoid-mimetic drug designed to resolve chronic inflammation, and fibrotic processes. In November 2016, Corbus reported positive topline data results from a Phase 2 study in diffuse cutaneous systemic sclerosis, showing clear signal of clinical benefit with JBT-101. The Company recently completed a Phase 2 study of JBT-101 for the treatment of cystic fibrosis with topline data expected to be announced before the end of the first quarter of 2017. Additionally, JBT-101 is being evaluated in a Phase 2, 12-month open label extension study in systemic sclerosis, a Phase 2 study in skin-predominant dermatomyositis, with a 12-month open label extension study in dermatomyositis and another Phase 2 study in systemic lupus erythematosus planned to commence in the first quarter of 2017. For more information, please visit www.CorbusPharma.com and connect with the Company on Twitter, LinkedIn, Google+ and Facebook. This press release contains certain forward-looking statements within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933 and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 and Private Securities Litigation Reform Act, as amended, including those relating to the Company's product development, clinical trials, clinical and regulatory timelines, market opportunity, competitive position, possible or assumed future results of operations, business strategies, potential growth opportunities and other statement that are predictive in nature. These forward-looking statements are based on current expectations, estimates, forecasts and projections about the industry and markets in which we operate and management's current beliefs and assumptions. These statements may be identified by the use of forward-looking expressions, including, but not limited to, "expect," "anticipate," "intend," "plan," "believe," "estimate," "potential," "predict," "project," "should," "would" and similar expressions and the negatives of those terms. These statements relate to future events or our financial performance and involve known and unknown risks, uncertainties, and other factors which may cause actual results, performance or achievements to be materially different from any future results, performance or achievements expressed or implied by the forward-looking statements. Such factors include those set forth in the Company's filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission. Prospective investors are cautioned not to place undue reliance on such forward-looking statements, which speak only as of the date of this press release. The Company undertakes no obligation to publicly update any forward-looking statement, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise.


Mast cells, a type of white blood cell, are present in the airways of severe asthmatics even in the face of aggressive treatment, and their presence is associated with key indicators of severe asthma. It has long been thought that these mast cells contribute to the disease and that targeting them may improve symptoms and quality of life for patients with severe asthma. In a new, proof-of-principle study published in the New England Journal of Medicine, researchers from Brigham and Women's Hospital have found that targeting the mast cells with imatinib, a drug used to effectively treat certain forms of cancer, improved airway hyperresponsiveness, a measure of the sensitivity of the airway, and decreased the number of mast cells present in the airway. Treatment also produced a small improvement in airway function. "By targeting these mast cells, we can actually make a difference for our patients with severe asthma," said Elliot Israel, MD, a physician and researcher in the Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine at BWH and senior author of the paper. "This is an exciting development because patients with severe asthma often have poor disease control even when adhering to our best and most aggressive therapies." Imatinib (brand name Gleevec), is one of the first precision medicine cancer therapies and is currently used to effectively treat certain forms of cancer that have a specific mutation. It works by targeting the processes responsible for mast cell development, stem cell factor and its receptor, the KIT receptor tyrosine kinase, which are essential for not only normal mast cell development but also their survival. These new results suggest that KIT-dependent processes and mast cells contribute to the process of severe asthma, and suggest that imatinib and drugs that can inhibit mast cell development may be effective therapies for patients with severe asthma who do not respond well to current treatment options. "This study shows how the investigator community begins to apply knowledge of basic disease pathogenesis to tailor interventions to specific patient populations, which leads to more effective therapy. This is particularly the case for this patient group with a disease that is difficult to treat and that has a high morbidity rate," said James Kiley, Ph.D., director, Division of Lung Diseases, at the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI). In a double-blind, placebo-controlled 24-week trial of 62 participants with poorly-controlled severe asthma, researchers evaluated the impact of imatinib on the change in airway hyperresponsiveness and mast cell presence. Participants in the treatment group received imatinib for six months. Participants underwent a bronchoscopy with airway biopsy at the beginning and the conclusion of the study to assess airway mast cells. Airway responsiveness and airway function were also measured during the study. Israel and his colleagues report that patients in the treatment group experienced a reduction in airway hyperresponsiveness compared to placebo. Specifically, after three months, airway responsiveness decreased 50 percent in those treated with imatinib compared to those who received placebo. A similar degree of difference was seen between the groups at six months. Additionally, researchers found that imatinib reduced serum tryptase, a marker of mast cell activation, compared with placebo. Researchers also report that patients in the treatment group experienced a relaxation and opening up of the airways, which was an unexpected observation. Researchers note that patients in the treatment group experienced higher rates of muscle cramps and an abnormally low level of phosphate in the blood. While the results are preliminary, Israel and colleagues found that imatinib was more effective in patients who had less eosinophils, a type of disease-fighting white blood cell present in high numbers in certain types of severe asthma. "There are several new drugs for severe asthma that target the more allergic, or eosinophilic, type of severe asthma. If confirmed, our finding -- that targeting mast cells is effective for patients who do not have eosinophilic-type asthma -- is particularly exciting because this group of patients, which make up about 40 percent of patients with severe asthma, have no current treatment options to control their disease." Researchers note that larger-scale studies are needed to confirm their finding and evaluate longer durations of therapy in order to definitively determine clinical efficacy. Planning for these trials is underway.


Mast cells, a type of white blood cell, are present in the airways of severe asthmatics even in the face of aggressive treatment, and their presence is associated with key indicators of severe asthma. It has long been thought that these mast cells contribute to the disease and that targeting them may improve symptoms and quality of life for patients with severe asthma. In a new, proof-of-principle study published in the New England Journal of Medicine, researchers from Brigham and Women's Hospital have found that targeting the mast cells with imatinib, a drug used to effectively treat certain forms of cancer, improved airway hyperresponsiveness, a measure of the sensitivity of the airway, and decreased the number of mast cells present in the airway. Treatment also produced a small improvement in airway function. "By targeting these mast cells, we can actually make a difference for our patients with severe asthma," said Elliot Israel, MD, a physician and researcher in the Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine at BWH and senior author of the paper. "This is an exciting development because patients with severe asthma often have poor disease control even when adhering to our best and most aggressive therapies." Imatinib (brand name Gleevec), is one of the first precision medicine cancer therapies and is currently used to effectively treat certain forms of cancer that have a specific mutation. It works by targeting the processes responsible for mast cell development, stem cell factor and its receptor, the KIT receptor tyrosine kinase, which are essential for not only normal mast cell development but also their survival. These new results suggest that KIT-dependent processes and mast cells contribute to the process of severe asthma, and suggest that imatinib and drugs that can inhibit mast cell development may be effective therapies for patients with severe asthma who do not respond well to current treatment options. "This study shows how the investigator community begins to apply knowledge of basic disease pathogenesis to tailor interventions to specific patient populations, which leads to more effective therapy. This is particularly the case for this patient group with a disease that is difficult to treat and that has a high morbidity rate," said James Kiley, Ph.D., director, Division of Lung Diseases, at the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI). In a double-blind, placebo-controlled 24-week trial of 62 participants with poorly-controlled severe asthma, researchers evaluated the impact of imatinib on the change in airway hyperresponsiveness and mast cell presence. Participants in the treatment group received imatinib for six months. Participants underwent a bronchoscopy with airway biopsy at the beginning and the conclusion of the study to assess airway mast cells. Airway responsiveness and airway function were also measured during the study. Israel and his colleagues report that patients in the treatment group experienced a reduction in airway hyperresponsiveness compared to placebo. Specifically, after three months, airway responsiveness decreased 50 percent in those treated with imatinib compared to those who received placebo. A similar degree of difference was seen between the groups at six months. Additionally, researchers found that imatinib reduced serum tryptase, a marker of mast cell activation, compared with placebo. Researchers also report that patients in the treatment group experienced a relaxation and opening up of the airways, which was an unexpected observation. Researchers note that patients in the treatment group experienced higher rates of muscle cramps and an abnormally low level of phosphate in the blood. While the results are preliminary, Israel and colleagues found that imatinib was more effective in patients who had less eosinophils, a type of disease-fighting white blood cell present in high numbers in certain types of severe asthma. "There are several new drugs for severe asthma that target the more allergic, or eosinophilic, type of severe asthma. If confirmed, our finding - that targeting mast cells is effective for patients who do not have eosinophilic-type asthma - is particularly exciting because this group of patients, which make up about 40 percent of patients with severe asthma, have no current treatment options to control their disease." Researchers note that larger-scale studies are needed to confirm their finding and evaluate longer durations of therapy in order to definitively determine clinical efficacy. Planning for these trials is underway. Support for this study was provided by the NHLBI,the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases of the National Institutes of Health. ((NIH U01, HL102225, RO1 HL117945, RO1 AI078908, R37 AI052353, T32 AI007306-23, and K23 AI118804), and by contributions from the Vinik family and the Kaye family. Novartis provided imatinib free of charge and reviewed the protocol and the manuscript prior to submission but had no other role in the study.


News Article | May 19, 2017
Site: www.biosciencetechnology.com

A small clinical trial suggests that some patients with severe asthma may benefit from treatment with a targeted cancer drug. The study, conducted in part at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, showed that imatinib (brand name Gleevec), commonly prescribed to treat chronic myeloid leukemia, also targets specific immune cells known to drive inflammation in the lungs. The results are published May 17 in The New England Journal of Medicine. “We are still in the early phase of this research,” said Washington University co-author Mario Castro, M.D., the Alan A. and Edith L. Wolff Professor of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine. “The data are intriguing and promising, but we will need a much larger trial, perhaps with 300-500 patients, over a longer period of time, to see if Gleevec can have an impact on asthma symptoms and quality of life.” The trial involved 62 patients treated at seven academic medical centers across the country and was led by Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School. The researchers evaluated imatinib because it targets mast cells, which play a critical role in severe asthma. “In asthma, mast cells are key inflammatory cells that react to allergens and cause release of histamine and other mediators of inflammation,” Castro said. “Those contribute to our patients’ symptoms, including bronchospasm — a sudden contraction of the walls of the airway — wheezing and shortness of breath.” Castro said the trial was not large or long enough to determine whether patients experienced an improvement in symptoms, but the researchers did show that measures of airway inflammation were reduced in the patients receiving imatinib compared with a placebo. The patients in the trial were randomly assigned to receive imatinib or a placebo. The patients, their physicians and those analyzing the data did not know which patients received the drug and which received the placebo. Patients took the assigned drug or placebo daily. The trial lasted six months, with measures of asthma severity and airway inflammation taken at the beginning of the trial and at the three-month and six-month marks. Overall, patients taking imatinib performed better in assessments of airway reactivity and obstruction than patients receiving placebo. The improvement was modest, reaching statistical significance, but showing little evidence that clinical asthma symptoms had improved over the six months of the study. The researchers also measured lower blood levels of a chemical called tryptase in patients receiving imatinib compared with placebo. Tryptase is produced by mast cells, with lower amounts of it suggesting the drug is reducing inflammation mediated by this type of immune cell. Common treatments for asthma include inhaled steroids, which reduce all inflammation in a nontargeted way. In severe asthma, the steroid treatments often don’t control symptoms and the drugs have many side effects, especially for patients who have been taking them for many years. “A lot of patients with severe asthma have been taking high-dose steroids since childhood, and this long-term use has many negative consequences,” Castro said. “These patients are developing conditions like obesity, diabetes, high blood pressure and osteoporosis from their steroid use. And the steroids are not even effective in controlling their severe asthma.” Castro said the risks of taking a drug typically used for certain types of leukemia may be appropriate for patients with severe asthma if the drug provides the benefit of reducing or stopping steroid treatments. Though imatinib has a good safety record, it still raises concerns about suppressing the immune system. One patient stopped the trial because the white blood cell count became too low. Patients in the trial taking imatinib and placebo experienced similar numbers of adverse events, with adverse events due to asthma more common in the placebo group. Patients taking imatinib were more likely to experience muscle cramps and low blood phosphate levels. Three patients taking imatinib reported a total of seven severe adverse events. Five patients taking placebo reported 10 severe adverse events. When asthma-related adverse events were not counted in this total, there were five events reported in the imatinib group and three events in the placebo group.


News Article | May 16, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Dr. Jyothi Bhatt will lecture on the practical benefits of Ayurveda as a complementary diagnostic tool at the ninth annual mind/body medicine CME conference October 24-28, 2017 at the Cranwell Resort and Spa in Lenox, Massachusetts. Entitled “American Meditation: The Heart and Science of Yoga,” this 30 credit hour training is accredited through the Albany Medical College Office of Continuing Medical Education. Dr. Bhatt explains that, “the human digestive fire, known in Sanskrit as “agni,” represents the energy needed to maintain a homeostatic balance of both the mind and body. Burnout or stress occurs when agni is diminished--eventually resulting in fatigue. By regulating the fire element throughout the mind-body-sense complex through Ayurvedic principles of food and lifestyle choices, many burnout symptoms can be relieved and prevented.” Dr. Jyothi Bhatt holds a Bachelor of Ayurvedic Medicine & Surgery (BAMS) from the Shri Dharmasthala Manjunatheshwar College of Ayurveda in Kuthpady, Karnataka, India. She is currently a Physician’s Assistant at the NewYork-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center and a faculty member of the Kripalu School of Ayurveda. Through her two CME conference lectures on “The Science of Life,” Dr. Bhatt will explain how a basic understanding and practical application of Ayurveda can be used along side allopathic medicine in a complementary manner. According to Dr. Bhatt, “As a diagnostic tool, ancient Ayurvedic principles can reveal important physical, physiological, psychic and behavioral characteristics that lead to stress-induced burnout.” “The Heart and Science of Yoga®” conference offers comprehensive training in the world’s most effective holistic mind/body medicine and its scientific foundation. Now in it’s ninth year, the program is designed to encourage active participant interaction by combining engaging lectures, practicums, panel discussions and Q&A. This year’s AMI five-day CME conference will provide easy-to-learn practices that work synergistically (within the intricate medium of the stress system) to reduce inflammation, allostatic load and burnout while working toward establishing homeostasis. The devotion, enthusiasm, and teaching methodology of the entire AMI faculty will combine to create a dynamic and interactive course for healthcare professionals. Each AMI faculty member is committed to the advancement and training of Yoga Science as holistic mind/body medicine. In addition to Dr. Bhatt’s lectures on Ayurveda, presenters include program director Leonard Perlmutter, AMI founder, meditational therapist and award-winning author; Mark Pettus MD, Director of Medical Education and Population Health at Berkshire Health Systems; Anthony Santilli MD, board-certified in Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine; Prashant Kaushik MD, board-certified Rheumatologist; Sara Lazar PhD, instructor in the Department of Psychiatry at Harvard Medical School, and an Associate Researcher in the Psychiatry Department at Massachusetts General Hospital; Susan Lord MD, a private practice holistic physician focusing on prevention and treatment, and former course director for the The Center for Mind-Body Medicine’s “Food As Medicine” program in Washington, DC; Jesse Ritvo MD, Assistant Medical Director, Inpatient Psychiatry, University of Vermont Health Center; Beth Netter MD MT, holistic physician and acupuncturist, Albany, NY; Gustavo Grodnitzky PhD, noted author and psychologist and Chair of The American Meditation Institute's Psychological Education Department; and Jenness Cortez Perlmutter, faculty member of The American Meditation Institute. According to conference faculty director Leonard Perlmutter, “Most of the obstacles to health and well-being begin in the mind. Meditators learn how to develop the tools that can change the software of the mind and therefore, the reality they experience. By incorporating the practices taught at this conference, physicians can sharpen the focus of their attention, enhance their creativity, and experience a sense of purpose and comfort to better serve themselves, their families, their patients and their medical practices—without the pain of burnout.” About the American Meditation Institute The American Meditation Institute (AMI) is a 501(c)3 non-profit educational organization devoted to the teaching and practice of Yoga Science, meditation and its allied disciplines as mind/body medicine. In its holistic approach to wellness, AMI combines the healing arts of the East with the practicality of modern Western science. The American Meditation Institute offers a wide variety of classes, retreats, and teacher training programs. AMI also publishes “Transformation,” a quarterly journal of meditation as holistic mind/body medicine. Call 518.674.8714 for a postal or email subscription.


News Article | May 19, 2017
Site: www.biosciencetechnology.com

A small clinical trial suggests that some patients with severe asthma may benefit from treatment with a targeted cancer drug. The study, conducted in part at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, showed that imatinib (brand name Gleevec), commonly prescribed to treat chronic myeloid leukemia, also targets specific immune cells known to drive inflammation in the lungs. The results are published May 17 in The New England Journal of Medicine. “We are still in the early phase of this research,” said Washington University co-author Mario Castro, M.D., the Alan A. and Edith L. Wolff Professor of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine. “The data are intriguing and promising, but we will need a much larger trial, perhaps with 300-500 patients, over a longer period of time, to see if Gleevec can have an impact on asthma symptoms and quality of life.” The trial involved 62 patients treated at seven academic medical centers across the country and was led by Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School. The researchers evaluated imatinib because it targets mast cells, which play a critical role in severe asthma. “In asthma, mast cells are key inflammatory cells that react to allergens and cause release of histamine and other mediators of inflammation,” Castro said. “Those contribute to our patients’ symptoms, including bronchospasm — a sudden contraction of the walls of the airway — wheezing and shortness of breath.” Castro said the trial was not large or long enough to determine whether patients experienced an improvement in symptoms, but the researchers did show that measures of airway inflammation were reduced in the patients receiving imatinib compared with a placebo. The patients in the trial were randomly assigned to receive imatinib or a placebo. The patients, their physicians and those analyzing the data did not know which patients received the drug and which received the placebo. Patients took the assigned drug or placebo daily. The trial lasted six months, with measures of asthma severity and airway inflammation taken at the beginning of the trial and at the three-month and six-month marks. Overall, patients taking imatinib performed better in assessments of airway reactivity and obstruction than patients receiving placebo. The improvement was modest, reaching statistical significance, but showing little evidence that clinical asthma symptoms had improved over the six months of the study. The researchers also measured lower blood levels of a chemical called tryptase in patients receiving imatinib compared with placebo. Tryptase is produced by mast cells, with lower amounts of it suggesting the drug is reducing inflammation mediated by this type of immune cell. Common treatments for asthma include inhaled steroids, which reduce all inflammation in a nontargeted way. In severe asthma, the steroid treatments often don’t control symptoms and the drugs have many side effects, especially for patients who have been taking them for many years. “A lot of patients with severe asthma have been taking high-dose steroids since childhood, and this long-term use has many negative consequences,” Castro said. “These patients are developing conditions like obesity, diabetes, high blood pressure and osteoporosis from their steroid use. And the steroids are not even effective in controlling their severe asthma.” Castro said the risks of taking a drug typically used for certain types of leukemia may be appropriate for patients with severe asthma if the drug provides the benefit of reducing or stopping steroid treatments. Though imatinib has a good safety record, it still raises concerns about suppressing the immune system. One patient stopped the trial because the white blood cell count became too low. Patients in the trial taking imatinib and placebo experienced similar numbers of adverse events, with adverse events due to asthma more common in the placebo group. Patients taking imatinib were more likely to experience muscle cramps and low blood phosphate levels. Three patients taking imatinib reported a total of seven severe adverse events. Five patients taking placebo reported 10 severe adverse events. When asthma-related adverse events were not counted in this total, there were five events reported in the imatinib group and three events in the placebo group.


News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Board-certified internist and nephrologist Mark Pettus, MD joins the faculty of The American Meditation Institute (AMI) for a 30 credit hour mind/body medicine CME conference for physicians and other health care professionals, October 24-28, 2017 at the Cranwell Resort and Spa in Lenox, Massachusetts. Entitled "The Heart and Science of Yoga,” this 9th annual, comprehensive training, accredited through the American Medical Association and Albany Medical College Office of Continuing Medical Education, is designed to help prevent and relieve physician stress and burnout. Presenter Mark Pettus, MD currently serves as Medical Director of Education, Wellness and Population Health at Berkshire Health Systems, and Associate Dean of Medical Education at the University of Massachusetts Medical Center. A featured speaker on a number of nationally broadcast television and radio programs, Dr. Pettus is also the author of “The Savvy Patient” and “It’s All in Your Head: Change Your Mind, Change Your Health, & Change Your Life.” Dr. Pettus’s two lectures on ”Epigenomics and Inflammation” are designed to help relieve symptoms of physician and patient burnout by reducing allostatic load––the physiological consequences of chronic exposure to fluctuating or heightened neural or neuroendocrine responses resulting from chronic stress. Drawing on recent studies, Pettus will focus on how these areas of study are generating unprecedented medical understanding and insight into how AMI mantra meditation, gentle yoga and diaphragmatic breathing can have a fundamental influence on how our genes may express themselves. According to Dr. Pettus, “We’ve left behind the genetic perspective in which everything is preordained; the belief that whatever the translation of your genetic coding is, will manifest over the course of your life, and ultimately, there’s very little you can do about it. To the contrary, current clinical research is now suggesting a very, very different picture, in which genetic predisposition is no longer considered destiny.” The entire “Heart and Science of Yoga” CME curriculum is dedicated to providing quality, comprehensive and evidence-based education to physicians and other health care providers on Yoga Science as mind/body medicine. In addition to Epigenomics, topics this year will include mantra meditation, diaphragmatic breathing, Yoga Psychology, the chakra system as a diagnostic tool, mind function optimization, neuroplasticity, trauma, PTSD, relieving physician burnout, resilience, Functional Medicine, Ayurveda, easy-gentle yoga and lymph system detoxification. The dedication, enthusiasm, and teaching methodology of the entire AMI faculty create a dynamic and interactive course for their students. Each faculty member is committed to the advancement and training of Yoga Science as holistic mind/body medicine. In addition to Dr. Pettus, other presenters will include program director Leonard Perlmutter, AMI founder, meditational therapist, philosopher and award-winning author; Anthony Santilli MD, board-certified in Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine; Prashant Kaushik MD, board-certified Rheumatologist; Sara Lazar PhD, instructor in the Department of Psychiatry at Harvard Medical School, and an Associate Researcher in the Psychiatry Department at Massachusetts General Hospital; Susan Lord MD, a private practice holistic physician focusing on prevention and treatment, and former course director for the The Center for Mind-Body Medicine’s “Food As Medicine” program in Washington, DC; Jesse Ritvo MD, Assistant Medical Director, Inpatient Psychiatry, University of Vermont Health Center; Beth Netter MD MT, holistic physician and acupuncturist, Albany, NY; Jyothi Bhatt BAMS, Ayurvedic practitioner and faculty member of Kripalu School of Ayurveda and Physician’s Assistant at New York Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center; and Gustavo Grodnitzky PhD, noted author and psychologist and Chair of The American Meditation Institute's Psychological Education Department; Jenness Cortez Perlmutter, faculty member of The American Meditation Institute. According to AMI founder and conference director Leonard Perlmutter, “The more consistently the therapeutic practices of meditation and yoga are incorporated into the daily lives of physicians and patients, most symptoms of stress related burnout and chronic complex diseases can be diminished or eliminated.” 2016 conference graduate, Janine Pardo, MD, a Board Certified Internist and Primary Care Physician practicing in Weston, Massachusetts fully commented, “This retreat has been the most influential factor in transforming my life and medical practice. It comprehensively provides critical information, and should be a medical school requirement.” Use this link to see this on facebook. About the American Meditation Institute The American Meditation Institute is a 501(c)3 non-profit educational organization devoted to the teaching and practice of Yoga Science, meditation and its allied disciplines as mind/body medicine. In its holistic approach to wellness, AMI combines the healing arts of the East with the practicality of modern Western science. The American Meditation Institute offers a wide variety of classes, retreats, and teacher training programs. AMI also publishes “Transformation” a bi-monthly journal of meditation as holistic mind/body medicine. Call 518.674.8714 for a mail or email subscription.


News Article | April 18, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

To inspire other physicians who are experiencing the painful effects of stress, Dr. Prashant Kaushik will chronicle his own journey from burnout to homeostasis at the 9th annual CME Conference on Meditation and Yoga as Mind/Body Medicine, October 24-28, 2017 at the Cranwell Resort and Spa in Lenox, Massachusetts. Hosted by the American Meditation Institute and entitled “The Heart and Science of Yoga,” this comprehensive 30 credit-hour mind/body training on meditation, gentle yoga and diaphragmatic breathing, accredited through the Albany Medical College Office of Continuing Medical Education, is designed to help physicians and other healthcare professionals prevent and relieve burnout. Board-certified Rheumatologist Prashant Kaushik, MD knows all too well how the demands and stress of the medical profession can have a profound effect on the personal and professional lives of physicians and their patients. As a healthcare professional dedicated to expanding the current medical paradigm to include “self-care,” Dr. Kaushik will reveal how stress negatively affected his physical and mental wellbeing, and how he was able to transform his life with powerful AMI Meditation practices that reduce stress and enhance resilience and effectiveness. According to Dr. Kaushik, “Simple techniques like AMI mantra meditation, one-pointed attention, diaphragmatic breathing and easy-gentle yoga have been used for millennia to transform the debilitating nature of stress. When the practical tools of Yoga Science as mind/body medicine are incorporated into everyday life, physician burnout can be reversed dramatically and eliminated in many circumstances.” AMI faculty member Prashant Kaushik, MD received a Bachelor of Medicine & Surgery degree from the All India Institute of Medical Services, New Delhi. As a board-certified Rheumatologist, Dr. Kaushik serves as Lead Rheumatologist at the Albany VA Medical Center, Associate Professor, Department of Internal Medicine Albany Medical College, and is a member of the AMI Department of Medical Education. Dr. Kaushik is the 2015 recipient of the Albany Medical College’s Residency Teacher of the Year award. Defined as a “state of vital exhaustion” by the International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Edition, burnout in the medical profession has become a serious public health problem over the past decade. According to a March 2017 paper published on the National Academy of Medicine website, 54 percent of all physicians experience burnout (30–40 percent of employed physicians and 55–60 percent of self-employed physicians). Students, interns, and residents are close behind them, experiencing burnout at a rate of 20–40 percent. Recognizing this alarming trend, The American Meditation Institute is offering this unique mind/body medicine conference to help physicians alleviate their pain and enrich their health and wellbeing. Now in its ninth year of providing continuing medical education credits, the five-day retreat is carefully structured to optimize the experience of attendees. Each lecture is designed to reduce their allostatic load––the physiological consequences of chronic exposure to fluctuating or heightened neural or neuroendocrine responses resulting from chronic stress. The 30-hour CME comprehensive curriculum includes an in-depth study of the historical, philosophical and scientific nature of Yoga Science. Practical yogic skills will be taught to all attendees to expand their knowledge of and experience with health-affirming, yogic practices. Topics will include mantra-based AMI meditation, diaphragmatic breathing, Yoga Psychology, the chakra system as a diagnostic tool, mind function optimization, neuroplasticity, trauma, PTSD, Functional Medicine, Epigenomics, Ayurveda, nutrition, easy-gentle yoga and lymph system detoxification. An outstanding team of dedicated, enthusiastic, skilled health and wellness professionals, who draw on many years of experience in their respective fields, the AMI faculty will create a dynamic and interactive program for all attending medical professionals. In addition to Dr. Kaushik, this year’s presenters will include Leonard Perlmutter, AMI founder, philosopher, meditational therapist and award-winning author of “The Heart and Science of Yoga”; Mark Pettus MD, Director of Medical Education and Population Health at Berkshire Health Systems; Anthony Santilli MD, board-certified in Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine; Sara Lazar PhD, neuroscientist at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and instructor at Harvard Medical School; Susan Lord MD, a private practice holistic physician focusing on prevention and treatment, and former course director for the The Center for Mind-Body Medicine’s “Food As Medicine” program in Washington, DC; Jesse Ritvo MD, Assistant Medical Director, Inpatient Psychiatry, University of Vermont Health Center; Beth Netter MD MT, holistic physician and acupuncturist, Albany, NY; Jyothi Bhatt BAMS, Ayurvedic practitioner and faculty member of Kripalu School of Ayurveda and Physician’s Assistant at New York Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center; and Jenness Cortez Perlmutter, senior faculty member of The American Meditation Institute. According to Pamela Shervanick MD, who is a board certified psychiatrist in Barrington, Rhode Island and a recent AMI conference participant, “This conference has been life changing! Everyone in every facet of life should experience this. I’m so grateful for you and your institution and all involved for bringing truth to doctors with love and compassion. This is a light the world needs to see.” In addition to Dr. Shervanick, numerous medical pioneers and healthcare professionals such as Mehmet Oz MD, Dean Ornish MD and Bernie Siegel MD have also endorsed AMI’s core curriculum. Previous conference attendees have also noted that the material presented has made a beneficial impact toward their personal and professional efforts at self-care. About the American Meditation Institute The American Meditation Institute is a 501(c)3 non-profit educational organization devoted to the teaching and practice of Yoga Science, AMI meditation and its allied disciplines as mind/body medicine. In its holistic approach to wellness, AMI combines the healing arts of the East with the practicality of modern Western science. The American Meditation Institute offers a wide variety of classes, retreats, and teacher training programs. AMI also publishes Transformation a bi-monthly journal of meditation as holistic mind/body medicine. Call (518) 674-8714 for a mail or email subscription.


News Article | May 2, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

According to Leonard Perlmutter, founder of The American Meditation Institute, the curriculum presented at AMI’s ninth annual CME conference October 24-28, 2017 at the Cranwell Resort and Spa in Lenox, Massachusetts can help physicians relieve and prevent burnout. Entitled “The Heart and Science of Yoga” this comprehensive 30 credit hour training is accredited through the Albany Medical College Office of Continuing Medical Education. In addition to a core Yoga Science curriculum including meditation, diaphragmatic breathing and gentle yoga exercises, three testimonial lectures will be presented by Tony Santilli MD, Beth Netter MD and Prashant Kaushik MD—each of whom has successfully used Yoga Science techniques to reduce and eliminate their own physicians burnout symptoms. Coverys Risk Management, reporting on Medscape’s Lifestyle Report 2017: Race and Ethnicity, Bias and Burnout reports that the overall burnout rate for physicians is now at 51 percent, an increase from 40 percent in 2013. The survey also found, “the highest percentages of burnout occurred among physicians practicing emergency medicine (59%), followed by ob/gyns (56%) and family physicians, internists, and infectious disease physicians (all at 55%).” This year’s American Meditation Institute “Heart and Science of Yoga” CME conference is dedicated to providing physicians a quality, comprehensive and evidence-based education that prevents and reverses the debilitating causes and effects of physician burnout. Lectures include mantra meditation, diaphragmatic breathing, easy-gentle yoga, Yoga psychology, meditation and neuroplasticity, PTSD, trauma, resilience, chakra system therapy, mind function optimization, epigenomics, Ayurveda, nutrition, functional medicine, and lymph system detoxification. According to previous conference attendee, board certified psychiatrist, Rebecca Aspden MD, “Since attending this retreat, my mind is open to a different way of seeing the world. I am looking forward to implementing what I learned in my own life and imparting this new knowledge and new perspective to my patients.” Each faculty member at this year’s CME conference is committed to the advancement and training of Yoga Science as holistic mind/body medicine. Presenters will include program director Leonard Perlmutter, AMI founder, meditational therapist and award-winning author; Mark Pettus MD, Director of Medical Education and Population Health at Berkshire Health Systems; Anthony Santilli MD, board-certified in Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine; Prashant Kaushik MD, board-certified Rheumatologist; Sara Lazar PhD, instructor in the Department of Psychiatry at Harvard Medical School, and an Associate Researcher in the Psychiatry Department at Massachusetts General Hospital; Susan Lord MD, a private practice holistic physician focusing on prevention and treatment, and former course director for the The Center for Mind-Body Medicine’s “Food As Medicine” program in Washington, DC; Jesse Ritvo MD, Assistant Medical Director, Inpatient Psychiatry, University of Vermont Health Center; Beth Netter MD MT, holistic physician and acupuncturist, Albany, NY; Jyothi Bhatt BAMS, Ayurvedic practitioner and faculty member of Kripalu School of Ayurveda and Physician’s Assistant at New York Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center; Gustavo Grodnitzky PhD, noted author and psychologist and Chair of The American Meditation Institute's Psychological Education Department; and Jenness Cortez Perlmutter, faculty member of The American Meditation Institute. Noted physicians Mehmet Oz (Dr. Oz), Dean Ornish, Bernie Siegel and Larry Dossey have endorsed Mr. Perlmutter’s “The Heart and Science of Yoga” treatise, which serves as the primary curriculum for the conference. According to program director Leonard Perlmutter, “Now in its ninth year, this CME conference provides the only complete curriculum of the world’s most ancient mind/body medicine. The more physicians incorporate the therapeutic practices of Yoga Science and AMI Meditation into their daily lives, most symptoms of stress related burnout and chronic complex diseases can be diminished or eliminated.” About the American Meditation Institute The American Meditation Institute is a 501(c)3 non-profit educational organization devoted to the teaching and practice of Yoga Science, meditation and its allied disciplines as mind/body medicine. In its holistic approach to wellness, AMI combines the healing arts of the East with the practicality of modern Western science. The American Meditation Institute offers a wide variety of classes, retreats, and teacher training programs. AMI also publishes “Transformation” a bi-monthly journal of meditation as holistic mind/body medicine. Call 518.674.8714 for a mail or email subscription.

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