Shanghai Pudong New Area Center for Disease Control and Prevention

Shanghai, China

Shanghai Pudong New Area Center for Disease Control and Prevention

Shanghai, China
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Xu W.-L.,University of Sichuan | Zhang Q.,University of Sichuan | Huang C.-J.,Shanghai Pudong New Area Center for Disease Control and Prevention | Lan Y.-J.,University of Sichuan | And 2 more authors.
Journal of Sichuan University (Medical Science Edition) | Year: 2017

Objective: To investigate the polymorphisms in interleukin 17A (IL-17A) and interleukin 17F (IL-17F) and their relationship with pulmonary inflammation risk of dust exposed workers. Methods: A case-control study among 193 subjects, including 67 subjects in case group and 126 in control group was conducted. PCR-RFLP was applied to genotype IL-17A (G-197A) and IL-17F (7488T/C). Logistic regression analysis was used to determine the effects of IL-17A (G-197A) and IL-17F (7488T/C) on the lung inflammation risk in dust exposed workers. Results: The genotypes analysis showed that the proportions of IL-17A (G-197A) A/A, A/G and G/G were 42 (21.76%), 95 (49.22%), 56 (29.02%) in 193 cases, respectively, and the IL-17F (7488T/C) T/T, T/C and C/C genotypes were 128 (66.32%), 54 (28.98%), 11 (5.70%), respectively. The frequency distribution of each genotype was consistent with the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium fixed law. The ratio of IL-17A (G-197A) A/A in the case group was lower than that of control group (P < 0.05), while the G/G and A/G genotypes were higher than that of control group (P < 0.05). Furthermore, the genotypes of IL-17A (G-197A) A/G (OR=5.03, P < 0.01) and G/G (OR = 3.35, P < 0.05) were associated with an increased risk of lung inflammation in workers exposed to dust. The frequency distribution difference of IL-17F (7488T/C) T/T, T/C and C/C genotypes in the cases and control group was unobvious (P > 0.05). Conclusion: Under the same dust concentration, the dust exposed workers carrying 1L-17A (G-197A) A/G, G/G genotypes are more susceptible to pulmonary inflammation in the southwest of China.


PubMed | Research Base of Key Laboratory of Surveillance and Early Warning on Infectious Disease in China CDC and Shanghai Pudong New Area Center for Disease Control and Prevention
Type: Journal Article | Journal: PloS one | Year: 2015

Clinical and etiological characteristics of influenza-like illness (ILI) in outpatients is poorly understood in the southern temperate region of China. We conducted laboratory-based surveillance of viral etiology for ILI outpatients in Shanghai from January 2011 to December 2013.Clinical and epidemiological data from ILI outpatients, both children and adults, were collected. A total of 1970 nasopharyngeal swabs were collected and tested for 12 respiratory viruses using multiplex RT-PCR, and the data were analyzed anonymously.All 12 respiratory viruses were detected in the specimens. At least one virus was detected in 32.4% of 1970 specimens analyzed, with 1.1% showing co-infections. The most frequently detected agents were influenza A (11.7%), influenza B (9.6%), and rhinoviruses (3.1%).Other viruses were present at a frequency less than 3.0%. We observed a winter peak in the detection rate in ILI patients during 3 years of surveillance and a summer peak in 2012. HCoV, HADV, and HMPV were detected more frequently in children than in adults. Patients infected with influenza virus experienced higher temperatures, more coughs, running noses, headaches and fatigue than patients infected with other viruses and virus-free patients (p<0.001).The spectrum, seasonality, age distribution and clinical associations of respiratory virus infections in children and adults with influenza-like illness were analyzed in this study for the first time. To a certain extent, the findings can provide baseline data for evaluating the burden of respiratory virus infection in children and adults in Shanghai. It will also provide clinicians with helpful information about the etiological patterns of outpatients presenting with complaints of acute respiratory syndrome, but further studies should be conducted, and longer-term laboratory-based surveillance would give a better picture of the etiology of ILI.


Yan B.,Shanghai Pudong New Area Center for Disease Control and Prevention | Yan B.,University of Pittsburgh | Yang L.-M.,Shanghai Pudong New Area Center for Disease Control and Prevention | Hao L.-P.,Shanghai Pudong New Area Center for Disease Control and Prevention | And 9 more authors.
PLoS ONE | Year: 2016

Purpose: To evaluate the association of social support status, health insurance and clinical factors with the quality of life of Chinese women with breast cancer. Methods: Information on demographics, clinical characteristics, and social support status was collected from 1,160 women with newly diagnosed breast cancer in Shanghai, China. The Perceived Social Support Scale was used to assess different sources of social support for breast cancer patients. The quality of life was evaluated using the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Breast Cancer that consisted of five domains: breast cancer-specific, emotional, functional, physical, and social & family well-being. Multivariate linear regression models were used to evaluate the associations of demographic variables, clinical characteristics, and social support status with the quality of life measures. Results: Adequate social support from family members, friends and neighbors, and higher scores of Perceived Social Support Scale were associated with significantly improved quality of life of breast cancer patients. Higher household income, medical insurance plans with low copayment, and treatment with traditional Chinese medicine for breast cancer all were associated with higher (better) scores of quality of life measures whereas patients receiving chemotherapy had significantly lower scores of quality of life. Conclusion: Social support and financial aids may significantly improve the quality of life of breast cancer survivors. © 2016 Yan et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.


PubMed | Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Shanghai Minhang District Center for Disease Control and Prevention, U.S. Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Shanghai Pudong New Area Center for Disease Control and Prevention and 2 more.
Type: Historical Article | Journal: Clinical infectious diseases : an official publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America | Year: 2014

The majority of human cases of novel avian influenza A(H7N9), which emerged in China in spring 2013, include reported exposure to poultry. However, specific host and exposure risk factors for disease are unknown, yet critical to design prevention measures.In April-June 2013, we conducted a case-control study in 8 Chinese provinces. Patients with laboratory-confirmed A(H7N9) (n = 89) were matched by age, sex, and neighborhood to controls (n = 339). Subjects completed a questionnaire on medical history and potential exposures, including poultry markets and other poultry exposure. We used conditional logistic regression to calculate matched and adjusted odds ratios (ORs) for the association of A(H7N9) virus infection with potential risk factors.Fifty-five percent of patients compared with 31% of controls reported any contact with poultry (matched OR [mOR], 7.8; 95% confidence interval [CI], 3.3-18.8). Sixty-seven percent of patients compared with 35% of controls visited a live poultry market (mOR, 5.4; CI, 3.0-9.7). Visiting live poultry markets increased risk of infection even after adjusting for poultry contact and other confounders (adjusted OR, 3.4; CI, 1.8-6.7). Backyard poultry were not associated with increased risk; 14% of cases did not report any poultry exposure or market visit. Obesity (mOR, 4.7; CI, 1.8-12.4), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (mOR, 2.7; CI, 1.1-6.9), and immunosuppressive medications (mOR, 9.0; CI, 1.7-47.2) were associated with A(H7N9) disease.Exposures to poultry in markets were associated with A(H7N9) virus infection, even without poultry contact. China should consider permanently closing live poultry markets or aggressively pursuing control measures to prevent spread of this emerging pathogen.


PubMed | Shanghai Pudong New Area Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Shanghai JiaoTong University and University of Pittsburgh
Type: Journal Article | Journal: PloS one | Year: 2016

To evaluate the association of social support status, health insurance and clinical factors with the quality of life of Chinese women with breast cancer.Information on demographics, clinical characteristics, and social support status was collected from 1,160 women with newly diagnosed breast cancer in Shanghai, China. The Perceived Social Support Scale was used to assess different sources of social support for breast cancer patients. The quality of life was evaluated using the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Breast Cancer that consisted of five domains: breast cancer-specific, emotional, functional, physical, and social & family well-being. Multivariate linear regression models were used to evaluate the associations of demographic variables, clinical characteristics, and social support status with the quality of life measures.Adequate social support from family members, friends and neighbors, and higher scores of Perceived Social Support Scale were associated with significantly improved quality of life of breast cancer patients. Higher household income, medical insurance plans with low copayment, and treatment with traditional Chinese medicine for breast cancer all were associated with higher (better) scores of quality of life measures whereas patients receiving chemotherapy had significantly lower scores of quality of life.Social support and financial aids may significantly improve the quality of life of breast cancer survivors.


Wang J.-F.,CAS Beijing Institute of Geographic Sciences and Nature Resources Research | Reis B.Y.,Harvard University | Hu M.-G.,CAS Beijing Institute of Geographic Sciences and Nature Resources Research | Christakos G.,San Diego State University | And 7 more authors.
PLoS ONE | Year: 2011

Background: Population health attributes (such as disease incidence and prevalence) are often estimated using sentinel hospital records, which are subject to multiple sources of uncertainty. When applied to these health attributes, commonly used biased estimation techniques can lead to false conclusions and ineffective disease intervention and control. Although some estimators can account for measurement error (in the form of white noise, usually after de-trending), most mainstream health statistics techniques cannot generate unbiased and minimum error variance estimates when the available data are biased. Methods and Findings: A new technique, called the Biased Sample Hospital-based Area Disease Estimation (B-SHADE), is introduced that generates space-time population disease estimates using biased hospital records. The effectiveness of the technique is empirically evaluated in terms of hospital records of disease incidence (for hand-foot-mouth disease and fever syndrome cases) in Shanghai (China) during a two-year period. The B-SHADE technique uses a weighted summation of sentinel hospital records to derive unbiased and minimum error variance estimates of area incidence. The calculation of these weights is the outcome of a process that combines: the available space-time information; a rigorous assessment of both, the horizontal relationships between hospital records and the vertical links between each hospital's records and the overall disease situation in the region. In this way, the representativeness of the sentinel hospital records was improved, the possible biases of these records were corrected, and the generated area incidence estimates were best linear unbiased estimates (BLUE). Using the same hospital records, the performance of the B-SHADE technique was compared against two mainstream estimators. Conclusions: The B-SHADE technique involves a hospital network-based model that blends the optimal estimation features of the Block Kriging method and the sample bias correction efficiency of the ratio estimator method. In this way, B-SHADE can overcome the limitations of both methods: Block Kriging's inadequacy concerning the correction of sample bias and spatial clustering; and the ratio estimator's limitation as regards error minimization. The generality of the B-SHADE technique is further demonstrated by the fact that it reduces to Block Kriging in the case of unbiased samples; to ratio estimator if there is no correlation between hospitals; and to simple statistic if the hospital records are neither biased nor space-time correlated. In addition to the theoretical advantages of the B-SHADE technique over the two other methods above, two real world case studies (hand-foot-mouth disease and fever syndrome cases) demonstrated its empirical superiority, as well. © 2011 Wang et al.


Fu Y.,Research Base of Key Laboratory of Surveillance and Early Warning on Infectious Disease China CDC | Pan L.,Shanghai Pudong New Area Center for Disease Control and Prevention | Sun Q.,Research Base of Key Laboratory of Surveillance and Early Warning on Infectious Disease China CDC | Zhu W.,Research Base of Key Laboratory of Surveillance and Early Warning on Infectious Disease China CDC | And 7 more authors.
PLoS ONE | Year: 2015

Introduction: Clinical and etiological characteristics of influenza-like illness (ILI) in outpatients is poorly understood in the southern temperate region of China. We conducted laboratory-based surveillance of viral etiology for ILI outpatients in Shanghai from January 2011 to December 2013. Materials and Methods: Clinical and epidemiological data from ILI outpatients, both children and adults, were collected. A total of 1970 nasopharyngeal swabs were collected and tested for 12 respiratory viruses using multiplex RT-PCR, and the data were analyzed anonymously. Results: All 12 respiratory viruses were detected in the specimens. At least one virus was detected in 32.4% of 1970 specimens analyzed, with 1.1% showing co-infections. The most frequently detected agents were influenza A (11.7%), influenza B (9.6%), and rhinoviruses (3.1%). Other viruses were present at a frequency less than 3.0%.We observed a winter peak in the detection rate in ILI patients during 3 years of surveillance and a summer peak in 2012. HCoV, HADV, and HMPV were detected more frequently in children than in adults. Patients infected with influenza virus experienced higher temperatures, more coughs, running noses, headaches and fatigue than patients infected with other viruses and virus-free patients (p<0.001). Conclusions: The spectrum, seasonality, age distribution and clinical associations of respiratory virus infections in children and adults with influenza-like illness were analyzed in this study for the first time. To a certain extent, the findings can provide baseline data for evaluating the burden of respiratory virus infection in children and adults in Shanghai. It will also provide clinicians with helpful information about the etiological patterns of outpatients presenting with complaints of acute respiratory syndrome, but further studies should be conducted, and longer-term laboratory-based surveillance would give a better picture of the etiology of ILI. © 2015 Fu et al.


Dong H.,Huazhong University of Science and Technology | Deng M.,Hubei University of Education | Wang W.,Shanghai Pudong New Area Center for Disease Control and Prevention | Zhang J.,Huazhong University of Science and Technology | And 2 more authors.
Forensic Science International | Year: 2015

A present limitation of forensic anthropology practice in China is the lack of population-specific criteria on contemporary human skeletons. In this study, a sample of 203 maxillofacial Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) images, including 96 male and 107 female cases (20-65 years old), was analyzed to explore mandible sexual dimorphism in a population of contemporary adult Han Chinese to investigate the potential use of the mandible as sex indicator. A three-dimensional image from mandible CBCT scans was reconstructed using the SimPlant Pro 11.40 software. Nine linear and two angular parameters were measured. Discriminant function analysis (DFA) and logistic regression analysis (LRA) were used to develop the mathematics models for sex determination. All of the linear measurements studied and one angular measurement were found to be sexually dimorphic, with the maximum mandibular length and bi-condylar breadth being the most dimorphic by univariate DFA and LRA respectively. The cross-validated sex allocation accuracies on multivariate were ranged from 84.2% (direct DFA), 83.5% (direct LRA), 83.3% (stepwise DFA) to 80.5% (stepwise LRA). In general, multivariate DFA yielded a higher accuracy and LRA obtained a lower sex bias, and therefore both DFA and LRA had their own advantages for sex determination by the mandible in this sample. These results suggest that the mandible expresses sexual dimorphism in the contemporary adult Han Chinese population, indicating an excellent sexual discriminatory ability. Cone beam computed tomography scanning can be used as alternative source for contemporary osteometric techniques. © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd.


Sun Q.,Shanghai Pudong New Area Center for Disease Control and Prevention
Zhonghua liu xing bing xue za zhi = Zhonghua liuxingbingxue zazhi | Year: 2011

To compare the different thresholds of 'moving percentile method' for outbreak detection in the China Infectious Diseases Automated-alert and Response System (CIDARS). The thresholds of P(50), P(60), P(70), P(80) and P(90) were respectively adopted as the candidates of early warning thresholds on the moving percentile method. Aberration was detected through the reported cases of 19 notifiable infectious diseases nationwide from July 1, 2008 to June 30, 2010. Number of outbreaks and time to detection were recorded and the amount of signals acted as the indicators for determining the optimal threshold of moving percentile method in CIDARS. The optimal threshold for bacillary and amebic dysentery was P(50). For non-cholera infectious diarrhea, dysentery, typhoid and paratyphoid, and epidemic mumps, it was P(60). As for hepatitis A, influenza and rubella, the threshold was P(70), but for epidemic encephalitis B it was P(80). For the following diseases as scarlet fever, typhoid and paratyphoid, hepatitis E, acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis, malaria, epidemic hemorrhagic fever, meningococcal meningitis, leptospirosis, dengue fever, epidemic endemic typhus, hepatitis C and measles, it was P(90). When adopting the adjusted optimal threshold for 19 infectious diseases respectively, 64 840 (12.20%) signals had a decrease, comparing to the adoption of the former defaulted threshold (P(50)) during the 2 years. However, it did not reduce the number of outbreaks being detected as well as the time to detection, in the two year period. The optimal thresholds of moving percentile method for different kinds of diseases were different. Adoption of the right optimal threshold for a specific disease could further optimize the performance of outbreak detection for CIDARS.


PubMed | Shanghai Pudong New Area Center for Disease Control and Prevention
Type: Comparative Study | Journal: Zhonghua liu xing bing xue za zhi = Zhonghua liuxingbingxue zazhi | Year: 2011

To compare the different thresholds of moving percentile method for outbreak detection in the China Infectious Diseases Automated-alert and Response System (CIDARS).The thresholds of P(50), P(60), P(70), P(80) and P(90) were respectively adopted as the candidates of early warning thresholds on the moving percentile method. Aberration was detected through the reported cases of 19 notifiable infectious diseases nationwide from July 1, 2008 to June 30, 2010. Number of outbreaks and time to detection were recorded and the amount of signals acted as the indicators for determining the optimal threshold of moving percentile method in CIDARS.The optimal threshold for bacillary and amebic dysentery was P(50). For non-cholera infectious diarrhea, dysentery, typhoid and paratyphoid, and epidemic mumps, it was P(60). As for hepatitis A, influenza and rubella, the threshold was P(70), but for epidemic encephalitis B it was P(80). For the following diseases as scarlet fever, typhoid and paratyphoid, hepatitis E, acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis, malaria, epidemic hemorrhagic fever, meningococcal meningitis, leptospirosis, dengue fever, epidemic endemic typhus, hepatitis C and measles, it was P(90). When adopting the adjusted optimal threshold for 19 infectious diseases respectively, 64 840 (12.20%) signals had a decrease, comparing to the adoption of the former defaulted threshold (P(50)) during the 2 years. However, it did not reduce the number of outbreaks being detected as well as the time to detection, in the two year period.The optimal thresholds of moving percentile method for different kinds of diseases were different. Adoption of the right optimal threshold for a specific disease could further optimize the performance of outbreak detection for CIDARS.

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