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"President Trump has appointed Daniel Simmons, a conservative scholar who sharply questioned the value of promoting renewable energy sources and curbs on greenhouse gas emissions, to oversee the Energy Department’s Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), according to an email distributed to department employees. The selection marks one of several recent Trump appointments to top energy and environmental posts, which appear to repudiate the Obama administration’s policies aimed at shifting the nation to low-carbon sources of electricity. Last week, Trump nominated David Bernhardt, a lobbyist who served at the Interior Department under George W. Bush, as Interior’s deputy secretary. And Alex Herrgott, who had served as majority deputy staff director at the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee, has joined the White House Council on Environmental Quality to serve as associate director for infrastructure. Though no official announcement has been made, the acting head of the office, Steve Chalk, sent an email to DOE employees Monday saying that Simmons, a member of the Trump transition team, will become the principal deputy assistant secretary for EERE. Simmons will serve as acting assistant secretary until someone is confirmed by the Senate for the post, Chalk added. “Daniel has been with us through the transition and we look forward to his continued leadership and insights moving forward,” Chalk wrote." Juliet Eilperin and Brady Dennis report for the Washington Post May 2, 2017.


News Article | May 2, 2017
Site: www.washingtonpost.com

President Trump has appointed Daniel Simmons, a conservative scholar who sharply questioned the value of promoting renewable energy sources and curbs on greenhouse gas emissions, to oversee the Energy Department’s Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), according to an email distributed to department employees. The selection marks one of several recent Trump appointments to top energy and environmental posts, which appear to repudiate the Obama administration’s policies aimed at shifting the nation to low-carbon sources of electricity. Last week, Trump nominated David Bernhardt, a lobbyist who served at the Interior Department under George W. Bush, as Interior’s deputy secretary. And Alex Herrgott, who had served as majority deputy staff director at the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee, has joined the White House Council on Environmental Quality to serve as associate director for infrastructure. Though no official announcement has been made, the acting head of the office, Steve Chalk, sent an email to DOE employees Monday saying that Simmons, a member of the Trump transition team, will become the principal deputy assistant secretary for EERE. Simmons will serve as acting assistant secretary until someone is confirmed by the Senate for the post, Chalk added. “Daniel has been with us through the transition and we look forward to his continued leadership and insights moving forward,” Chalk wrote. Simmons’s appointment was first reported by E&E News. EERE’s primary mission is to foster the development of renewable and energy-efficient technologies. That includes investments in electric vehicles; solar, geothermal and wind energy; and technologies to reduce energy use in U.S. buildings. [New EPA documents reveal even deeper proposed cuts to staff and programs] Before Trump was elected, Simmons served as vice president for policy at the Institute for Energy Research, a conservative think tank that espouses fossil fuel use and opposes the international climate agreement that nearly 200 countries struck in Paris in late 2015. The institute’s president, Thomas J. Pyle, headed the transition team for the Energy Department but has returned to his post in the private sector. “I applaud President Trump and Secretary Perry for selecting Daniel for a leadership role at the Department of Energy,” Pyle said of Simmons’ appointment. “His years of experience in energy and environmental policy and appreciation for the power of free markets and consumer choice will bring a fresh perspective to the agency.” Testifying before Congress in July, Simmons criticized federal financial support for the Ivanpah power plant, an industrial-scale solar plant in California’s Mojave Desert. “It is unseemly that the American taxpayer has contributed billions of dollars to these facilities,” Simmons said of the project, which is sponsored by Google and other private companies. In a 2013 podcast with the Heartland Institute, a libertarian public policy think tank, Simmons argued that pursuing renewable energy could harm people’s pocketbooks. “The most simple of all points is that no matter what the renewable guys say, what they will admit is that their type of power — the wind and solar — is more expensive and will increase the price of electricity,” he said. “And in an economy that is struggling, it is critical that we do everything we can to keep prices low.” At a Politico energy forum last year, he was direct about his disdain for federal subsidies for renewable energy. “I think that everything should be treated equally across the board,” Simmons said. “We have to look at the track record of the oil and gas industry [which is] producing low-cost, reliable energy, particularly when the alternative is much, much higher prices.” Simmons’s appointment is likely to spark criticism from the same environmentalists who were quick to decry Bernhardt’s nomination. In his capacity as a partner at Brownstein, Hyatt, Farber and Schreck, Bernhardt represented oil and gas firms, mining companies and agricultural interests. “Appointing a lobbyist like Bernhardt shows just how empty Donald Trump’s promise to drain the swamp was,” said Brett Hartl, government affairs director at the Center for Biological Diversity, an advocacy group. “From Scott Pruitt to Bernhardt, President Trump has assembled the most anti-environmental administration in history.” Herrgott’s appointment, by contrast, is likely to be less controversial. While Herrgott worked for Sen. James M. Inhofe (R-Okla.), who has been a leading skeptic of climate science and an opponent of Obama administration plans to cut carbon emissions, he also worked with union officials and Democrats on the Hill to help ensure passage of key infrastructure measures, such as the 2015 Fixing America’s Surface Transportation (FAST) Act and the 2016 reauthorization of the Water Resources Development Act. Americans for Transportation Mobility executive director Ed Mortimer, whose U.S. Chamber of Commerce-led group is made up of both business and labor interests, praised Herrgott’s selection. “The ATM coalition is glad to see someone like Alex, who has experience with and an understanding of transportation issues, join the administration as it gears up to formulate a plan to modernize America’s infrastructure.” Mortimer said in a statement.


A federal court on Friday granted the Trump administration’s request to suspend lawsuits against the Clean Power Plan rule, signaling the likely end of President Barack Obama’s signature climate policy. The order from the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia stays litigation against the Environmental Protection Agency rule for 60 days. It does not indicate whether the D.C. Circuit will return the rule to the agency, although the EPA did not ask for it to do so. Instead, the order asks for guidance on whether to send the regulation back altogether. “Pursuant to the president’s executive order, Administrator [Scott] Pruitt has already announced that EPA is reviewing  the Obama Administration’s Clean Power Plan,” said agency spokesman J.P. Freire. “We are pleased that this order gives EPA the opportunity to proceed with that process.” [The Trump White House is at war with itself about climate change] Opponents of the Obama-era rule, which sought to impose the first-ever federal limits on existing power plants, hailed the decision. “The D.C. Circuit has done the right thing,” David Rivkin, a constitutional lawyer who represented the 28 states that sued over the regulation, said in an interview. “It is indeed the death knell of the Clean Power Plan. In effect, the previous administration has only itself to blame. Many of the rules it has done have been plagued by fundamental constitutional infirmities.” Senate Environment and Public Works Committee Chairman John Barrasso (R-Wyo.), called the move “a win for Wyoming’s energy workers.” But environmental and public health groups, which supported the move to cut carbon pollution from the power sector by 32 percent below 2005 levels, predicted they could still prevail in court. [For the first time on record, human-caused climate change has rerouted an entire river] “The Supreme Court is clear that EPA has a duty to protect Americans from dangerous climate pollution under our nation’s clean air laws, and Environmental Defense Fund will take swift action to ensure that EPA carries out its responsibilities under the law,” said EDF general counsel Vickie Patton, whose group is a party to the case. Sean Donahue, an attorney representing the Environmental Defense Fund in the case, noted that EPA has not asked for the court to return the rule because that would effectively lift the stay the Supreme Court put on the Clean Power Plan last year. Joanne Spalding, chief climate counsel for the Sierra Club, said in an interview that Friday’s action doesn’t mark the end of the Clean Power Plan, despite what opponents might claim. “Not at all,” she said. “We will be arguing that the court should either decide the case, or it should remand the rule to EPA, which would have the effect of lifting the Supreme Court’s stay,” Spalding said. Trump signed an executive order a month ago that instructed the EPA to rewrite rules limiting carbon from new and existing power plants, and he ordered Attorney General Jeff Sessions to ask the D.C. Circuit to suspend litigation involving both regulations. The Obama-era rule limiting carbon emissions from any new, modified and reconstructed power plants remains in force because the Supreme Court did not suspend it.


News Article | April 29, 2017
Site: www.theguardian.com

Desperate councils risk being plunged into an Icelandic-style financial crisis after investing £1.5bn in the commercial property market, according to Sir Vince Cable, former business secretary. Heavy cuts in central government funding have left the authorities having to consider increasingly exotic solutions to ease their financial constraints. Between 2010 and 2015, there was a 37% cut in real terms in central government funding to local authorities. One option – popular in the last couple of years – has been to borrow from the Treasury-run Public Works Loan Board (PWLB) at very low rates of interest and then use the money to invest in commercial property ventures that offer returns of as much as 8%. But there are fears that the strategy is creating a bubble that could bankrupt some local authorities. “This is not a wise and sensible thing to do,” said Cable, who was business secretary in the Tory-Lib Dem coalition and is standing as Lib Dem candidate in his former seat in Twickenham, south-west London. “Local authorities have a long and inglorious history of gambling in financial and property markets,” he said. In the 1980s, Hammersmith and Fulham council was one of several local authorities that got into financial difficulties after becoming involved in complex bets on interest rates. Cable said he could understand why councils were considering such strategies. “When they are massively constrained in what they can do around council tax – and indeed commercial rates – they are trying to prevent even deeper and more damaging cuts by taking these unorthodox measures. In some cases they may succeed, but there is a very high risk of bankrupting their local authorities. It does suggest a certain degree of desperation.” Local government sources have defended the councils, saying that much of the money is invested in helping regenerate their local areas. But not in all cases. “What is so bizarre, so shocking, is that they are investing in property in other parts of the country,” Cable said. “It makes no sense whatsoever.” Matthew Oakeshott, an investment manager at Olim Property, said councils were “playing a gigantic game of Monopoly with taxpayers’ cash”. But authorities badly need returns at a time when interest rates remain low and demands on councils are rising. It is estimated that, by 2020, England’s councils will face a near £6bn funding gap between what they need to spend and what they receive. Most of this shortfall is due to rising costs linked to social care. Two years ago, the Local Government Association warned that a dozen councils were on the brink of financial failure. Since then, the councils have had to be inventive in seeking to balance their books. Several – such as Eastleigh, Kettering and Maidstone – have successfully exploited loans from the PWLB to invest in commercial property. This, in turn, has attracted interest from other councils. But such copycat behaviour is a concern, according to Cable, who drew comparisons with 2008, when many councils were left exposed after depositing millions of pounds in high-interest rate accounts offered by Icelandic banks, which then went bust. “It did very serious damage to some councils,” Cable said. “It should have been a warning to all corporate treasurers in local government to not go anywhere near this.” The extent to which councils are exposed to a downturn in the commercial property sector is unclear. Last month, Lord Myners tabled a parliamentary question asking the government to confirm how much money the PWLB had lent to local authorities to invest in commercial real estate between 2011 and 2016, and what it was doing to monitor the risk from such investments. Responding for the government, Baroness Neville-Rolfe said it was up to the councils to assess risk. She said: “The Public Works Loan Board is not required to collect information on the specific reasons that local authorities borrow from it, and so it does not hold information about the amount of lending that has been used for acquisition of commercial real estate.” However, estate agent Savills told the Financial Times that councils had invested £1.2bn in commercial property last year and a further £221m so far this year. An economic downturn could see commercial property yields drop, leaving councils exposed, say analysts. This fear has led some councils to resist investing, but others have developed considerable appetites. The Financial Times reported that Spelthorne borough council – which has assets of just £88m – bought a business park in Sunbury-on-Thames for £360m, having taken out 50 separate loans from the PWLB. Local government sources played down fears of a bubble, pointing out that every council investment was made on a case-by-case basis and had to meet strict borrowing criteria. Under the Prudential Code, councils must show that their investment plans are affordable, prudent and sustainable. A Treasury spokesman said: “Responsibility for local authority spending and borrowing decisions lies with locally elected councillors, who are democratically accountable to their electorates.”


Ventura County Public Works Agency demonstrates how "Public Works Connects Us" at annual educational event hosting over 500 county students, May 23


News Article | April 22, 2017
Site: www.PR.com

MWGC recently completed work on the new 5,287 square foot Nederland Public Works Facility. Nederland, CO, April 22, 2017 --( To the Town of Nederland’s delight, MWGC was able to construct this facility as a net-zero energy building. Photo voltaic solar panels installed on the roof, and storm water retention areas contribute to reducing this building’s carbon footprint. The Nederland Public Works facility will more than likely generate more electricity than it consumes, on a weekly basis. Included in the facility are administrative offices, drive-through vehicle maintenance bays with a two-post vehicle lift, shop space, overhead chain hoist, bunk rooms, and a conference room. Adding to the comfort of the building, is in-floor radiant heat. As the Public Works Department is responsible for water treatment, wastewater treatment, and parks and trail maintenance just to name a few. MWGC knew it was imperative to give the town of Nederland, and its employees a state of the art work space. Nederland, CO, April 22, 2017 --( PR.com )-- Work has been completed on the 5,287 square foot new Nederland Public Works Facility. The over $2 million project, constructed on a 5-acre site in the Arapahoe National Forest included clearing portions of the densely-vegetated lot, and extensive earthwork to bring the building site to final grade.To the Town of Nederland’s delight, MWGC was able to construct this facility as a net-zero energy building. Photo voltaic solar panels installed on the roof, and storm water retention areas contribute to reducing this building’s carbon footprint. The Nederland Public Works facility will more than likely generate more electricity than it consumes, on a weekly basis.Included in the facility are administrative offices, drive-through vehicle maintenance bays with a two-post vehicle lift, shop space, overhead chain hoist, bunk rooms, and a conference room. Adding to the comfort of the building, is in-floor radiant heat. As the Public Works Department is responsible for water treatment, wastewater treatment, and parks and trail maintenance just to name a few. MWGC knew it was imperative to give the town of Nederland, and its employees a state of the art work space. Click here to view the list of recent Press Releases from MW GOLDEN CONSTRUCTORS


News Article | April 21, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

HOUSTON--(BUSINESS WIRE)--The City of Houston and ENGIE are pleased to announce that ENGIE’s 50 MW SolaireHolman plant is now on line, operational, and capable of providing up to 10.5% of the City’s electricity needs with clean, affordable solar power for the next 20 years under a power purchase agreement. This agreement solidifies the City’s status as the largest municipal purchaser of renewable energy in the United States. Located in Alpine, Texas, SolaireHolman, developed and implemented jointly by ENGIE subsidiaries Solairedirect North America and ENGIE North America, is one of the largest solar installations in the state of Texas. The project includes 203,840 solar panels on 360 acres and will provide electricity for Houston locations as diverse as the Hermann Park Zoo, the Bob Lanier Public Works Building, wastewater treatment plants, and several Bush Intercontinental Airport terminals. “I want to thank ENGIE and all those who worked on this project for this fabulous Earth Day present,” said Mayor Sylvester Turner. “As the energy capital of the world, it is important that Houston lead by example and show that investing in solar and renewable energy is a critical tool cities must use to prepare for the future. As the nation’s largest municipal purchaser of green power, we are living proof that large, industrial cities like Houston can have a robust economy but also help fight climate change.” “We’re very proud to serve the City of Houston, a national innovator and substantial customer by any measure,” said Marc-Alain Behar, Managing Director for Solairedirect North America. “One of the most gratifying parts of our work at ENGIE is aligning with customers to provide the best value we can. Through SolaireHolman, the City of Houston will strengthen its energy portfolio with clean, low-cost solar power for the benefit of all the people who live and work in this vibrant community. What an excellent way to mark Earth Day 2017.” The SolaireHolman plant solidifies the City of Houston’s national leadership in renewable energy and growing use of solar energy. For the past two years, the City has ranked #1 in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA’s) Top 30 Local Government list of the largest green power users from the Green Power Partnership. Houston is also #7 on EPA’s overall Top 100 green power users. The City uses nearly one billion kilowatt-hours (kWh) of green power annually, which represents more than 89% of its total energy needs. With its North American headquarters in Houston, ENGIE manages a range of energy businesses in the United States and Canada, including electricity generation and cogeneration, natural gas and liquefied natural gas (LNG) distribution and sales, retail energy sales, and comprehensive services to help customers run their facilities more efficiently and optimize energy use and expense. Nearly 100 percent of the company’s power generation portfolio produces no carbon emissions or very few. Globally, the company is present in 70 countries and employs 153,090 people, including 1,000 researchers in 11 R&D centers. For more information, please visit www.engie-na.com, @ENGIENorthAm, and www.engie.com. ENGIE holds a 95% stake and 100% voting rights in Solairedirect, a key player in the generation of competitive solar power and present in four continents. Founded in 2006, Solairedirect’s objective is to create added value along the entire production chain, from development, construction and services, to solar power installation investments. As of December 31, 2016, Solairedirect recorded 1.5 GW of solar projects around the world (constructed and under construction). The fourth most populous city in the United States, Houston is home to more than 2 million people, 23 Fortune 500 companies, 500 cultural, visual, and performing arts organizations, 11,000 restaurants, one of the top two U.S. ports for both international waterborne tonnage handled and total cargo tonnage handled, and the largest medical center in the world. Also home to more than 5,000 energy related firms, Houston is considered by many to be the Energy Capital of the world.


News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Guard-All Building Solutions has completed construction of a sand storage building for the Garland, Texas Public Works department(PRWeb March 16, 2017)Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2017/03/prweb14156483.htm


News Article | April 22, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

The federal government is currently being funded by a continuing resolution that expires on April 28, 2017 – which also happens to be the 99th day of Donald Trump’s presidency. If Congress fails to approve a new spending deal before then, Trump’s 100th day as president will begin with a federal government shutdown. The last government shutdown took place under President Obama and lasted for more than two weeks in 2013. Hundreds of thousands of federal government employees were furloughed. The Smithsonian museums and National Park Service sites were closed, including the Statue of Liberty, Independence Hall in Philadelphia and the Washington monuments and memorials. With current fights in Congress over spending on the military, the border wall and sanctuary cities, it’s certainly possible that no new continuing resolution will be passed in time. That would make Trump’s 100th day in office an unusual anniversary, but the truth is not all recent presidents have much to brag about when it comes to the impact of their first months in office. The idea of using a president’s first 100 days in office as a way to evaluate him began in 1933 with Franklin D. Roosevelt – although FDR actually had in mind measuring the New Deal achievements of the first 100 days of a special congressional session that year. In a July 24 Fireside Chat, FDR referred to “the crowding events of the 100 days which had been devoted to the starting of the wheels of the New Deal.” Journalists, historians and political scientists continued the practice of looking for accomplishments in the early months of a presidency. During those 100 days, FDR got many major bills through Congress to battle the economic crisis of the Great Depression. These bills created the Public Works Administration and the Civilian Conservation Corps to provide job opportunities, the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation to insure bank deposits and the Tennessee Valley Authority to provide rural electricity. This flurry of activity became the standard by which future presidents would be judged – often coming up short. In a 2001 study, political scientists John Frendreis, Raymond Tatalovich and Jon Schaff determined that the presidents who followed FDR have not come close to his success levels in seeing proposed bills pass into law so early in their administrations. The authors attributed that to changes in Congress that have slowed down the lawmaking process. Let’s consider how the presidents have done. Following FDR’s death, Harry Truman’s first 100 days were focused on the closing battles of World War II, with Germany’s surrender occurring less than one month after Truman took office. Dwight Eisenhower’s first 100 days were similarly dominated by foreign policy, including the death of Soviet Union leader Joseph Stalin and negotiations to end the Korean War. John Kennedy entered office with an ambitious agenda, which included the creation of the Peace Corps, but his first 100 days are probably best remembered for the disastrous Bay of Pigs invasion of Cuba. Lyndon Johnson’s first 100 days were most consumed by coping with the aftermath of Kennedy’s assassination, but LBJ also used the period and Kennedy’s legacy to begin the groundwork to pass major civil rights and war on poverty legislation. While Richard Nixon also promoted an ambitious domestic agenda in the White House, his first 100 days contained no major visible achievements at the time. Nixon told reporters: “I don’t count either the days or the hours, really. I never thought in those terms. I plan for a long term.” Later, it was revealed that he had ordered a secret bombing of Cambodia during the period. Gerald Ford’s first 100 days are best remembered for his swearing-in ceremony following Nixon’s resignation, when he announced that “our long national nightmare is over.” He then pardoned Nixon one month later for any crimes the former president had committed in office. Jimmy Carter also had an inauspicious start. Possibly due to his inexperience in Washington, he asked Congress to pursue several different domestic policy goals, many of which never passed into law. Perhaps best remembered from Carter’s early months is his speech from the White House to declare that energy policy and efforts to end American dependence on oil were the “moral equivalent of war.” Ronald Reagan’s administration drew the lesson from his immediate predecessor that it was best to focus on one or two domestic issues during the first 100 days. Reagan spent his first months as president promoting an agenda of tax and spending cuts, though those did not pass into law until August 1981, four months later. Reagan’s first 100 days as president were also notable for the assassination attempt made against him, which limited his political efforts for part of the time period. George H.W. Bush’s first 100 days as president were largely a continuation of the policies of the Reagan presidency. They were noted at the time for being relatively uneventful, with a congressional battle over a secretary of defense nominee and the Exxon Valdez oil spill in Alaska dominating the political news. The biggest political news story during Bill Clinton’s first 100 days was probably the failure of his stimulus package of domestic spending increases to get past a Republican filibuster in the Senate, though the eventual budget that resulted helped steer the United States toward budget surpluses later in the decade. Clinton’s first month also included his signing of the Family and Medical Leave Act into law, the start of a debate about service of gays in the military and the creation of a task force on national health care reform, chaired by Hillary Clinton. George W. Bush took office in January 2001 after a disputed electoral outcome in Florida led to a 5-4 Supreme Court decision that essentially made him president. In a politically divided country, Bush’s strategy seemed to be to avoid controversy and build his political capital, with his major legislative proposals in the time period involving tax cuts and education reform. Due to the economic crisis that began during Bush’s final months as president, Barack Obama’s first 100 days in office were dominated by the passage of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, a package of economic stimulus investments that by some measures was even larger than those passed in FDR’s 100 days in 1933. During a CBS “60 Minutes” interview in November 2008, Obama even said he was reading about FDR’s 100 days as an example. Which brings us back to Donald Trump. Trump’s main political success so far has been the confirmation of Neil Gorsuch to the Supreme Court. His promised repeal and replacement of the Affordable Care Act failed to get support in Congress. His attempted travel entry bans of citizens of certain Islamic countries into the U.S. and attempted suspension of refugee entry have so far led to massive protests and have been blocked by federal judges. The Trump administration has also taken military action in Syria, Iraq, Yemen and Afghanistan, approved the construction of oil pipelines through North Dakota and sent out a request for contract bids to build a border wall with Mexico. It’s not clear yet which of these events will be well-remembered a year – or 10 – from now. One thing is sure. If the Liberty Bell or the Lincoln Memorial is closed to tourists on Trump’s 100th day as president, it’s likely that government malfunction will be what is remembered about Trump’s first few months in office. This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article. The Travel Costs Of Trump’s First 100 Days


News Article | April 19, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.com

Are you looking for a definitive report on the $27.9bn Access Control and Authentication sector? Rising security concerns, growing awareness and acceptance of the benefits of electronic security, infrastructure growth and government regulations are the key factors driving the growth of the access control and authentication market. The global access control and authentication market (electronic access control (EAC), automatic number plate recognition (ANPR), and document readers) will reach US$31.9 Bn in 2017. You will receive a highly granular 306 page market analysis report, by Visiongain segmented by region, by subsector and by end use, providing you with that complete industry outlook, essential for your business strategy. Key Features • Discover where the Access Control and Authentication business opportunities are • 236 tables, charts, and graphs reveal market data allowing you to target your strategy more effectively • Understand how the Access Control and Authentication market will develop? • Global, regional and Access Control and Authentication submarket forecasts and analysis from 2017-2027 illustrate the market progression • Find which Access Control and Authentication technology submarkets will thrive from 2017-2027 • Electronic Access Control (EAC) • Biometrics (Finger, Face & Iris Recognition, Other) • Card-Based Access Control (Smart Cards & Readers, Proximity Cards & Readers, Other) • RFID (Active, Passive) • See which Access Control and Authentication industry end-use submarkets will expand from 2017-2027 • Transportation & Logistics (Rail, Aviation, Port & Maritime, Road & City Transport, New Starts) • Government & Public Sector • Utilities / Energy (Green Energy Facility, Oil, Gas and Fossil Generation Facility, Nuclear Power) • Industrial • Retail • Business Organisation • Hospitality & Casinos • Healthcare • Educational (K-12 Institutions, Others) • Other • Locate the regional Access Control and Authentication market opportunities from 2017-2027 • Focused regional forecasts and analysis explore the future opportunities • North America • Europe • Asia Pacific • MEA • Latin America • Evaluate the factors influencing Access Control and Authentication market dynamics • Technological issues and constraints • Supply and demand dynamics • Competition from new product types • Research and development (R&D) strategy • Advances in product quality • Discover who the leading Access Control and Authentication companies are • Examine competitive positioning, capabilities, product portfolios, R&D activity, services, focus, strategies, M&A activity, and future outlook. • Access Ltd (Access-IS) • Bosch Security Systems, Inc. • Canon, Inc. • Genetec, Inc. • Honeywell International, Inc. • NDI Recognition Systems Ltd. • Panasonic Systems Network Co. Ltd. • Q-Free ASA • Tattile S.r.l • Zhejiang Dahua Technologies Co. Ltd. Who is this report for? • Access control and authentication technology companies • Biometrics specialists • Security experts & consultants • Security hardware and software vendors • R&D scientists • NPD staff • Transport & logistics companies • Energy companies • Healthcare companies • Aviation companies • Infrastructure developers • Educational institutions • CEOs • Asset managers • Heads of strategic development • Market analysts • Procurement staff • Company managers • Industry associations • Procurement managers • Security managers • Governmental departments & agencies To request a report overview of this report please email Sara Peerun at sara.peerun@visiongain.com or call Tel: +44-(0)-20-7336-6100 3M Company Access Ltd (Access-IS) Acrifab Pvt Ltd ID Solutions ACTI Allegion Alnet Systems Alphone Ambienta SGR S.p.A Apple Inc. AR Hungary (ARH,Inc.) Arecont Vision ASL interamerica Security Trading Inc. Assa Abloy Avigilon Avtech Axis Communications AB Axon Group Axxonsoft Ayonix Inc. Borer Data Systems Ltd. Bosch Security Systems Inc Bravida Fire & Security Canon Inc. CBORD Group, Inc Chrome Software Cisco Systems Inc Commax Costar Technologies C-Pro Electronics Cross Match Technologies, Inc., Crown Security Products Dali Technology Digital Barriers Dynacolour ELSAG North America, LLC Europay Everfocus Electronics Everspring Industry Exacq Technologies Inc. Exar Corporation Fermax Fulcrum Biometrics Gatso Australia Genetec Inc Geovision Geutebrueck HDPRO Hi Sharp Electronics HID Global Hitron Systems Honeywell International Inc Honeywell Security Group Hunt Electronic ID Wholesalers Industrial Automation and Control (Pty) Ltd. IT4Aero ITX Security KiwiSecurity Kocom Magal Security Systems MasterCard MEC Networks Corporation Milestone Systems A/S MiraSys Ltd. Morpho Safran Inc Napco Security Systems NDI Recognition Systems Ltd Nedap OnSSI Inc. Open Roads Consulting Inc Optex Panasonic Corporation Panasonic Systems Network Co. Ltd Pelco Inc (Schneider Electric) Phantasialand Theme Park PIPS Technology Ltd Q-Free ASA Quercus Technologies Rail Canada Salto Systems SL Samsung Electronics Schneider Electric Sierra Wireless Sony Corporation Streaming Networks Suprema Inc Synetctics Synology Tattile S.r.l The Boeing Co. TKH Group USoft Technologies Pvt. Ltd. VenTek Verint Systems Vicon Videotrend S.r.l. Visa Vivotek Inc. Zhejiang Dahua Technologies Co. Ltd. List of Organisations Mentioned American Association of Port Authorities BBC Boston Police Department Bureau of Immigration (Philippines) Canadian Air Transport Security Authority (CATSA) Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) China Association of Automobile Manufacturers (CAMM) Delhi Traffic Police Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency (DVLA) Energy Information Administration (EIA) Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Eurocontrol European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) European Commission European Sea Ports Organization Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) Healthcare Distribution Management Association (HDMA) Hong Kong International Airport international Air Transport Association (IATA) International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) International Union of Railways (UIC) Interpol Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court National Center for Education Statistics, U.S. National Traffic Department (Brazil) New York Police Department Ninoy Aquino International Airport (NAIA) Organization for Economic Co-Operation and Development (OECD) Pew Hispanic Organization Public Works Department of Kansas City The American Planning Association Transportation Security Administration (TSA) U.K. Police U.S, Department of State U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) U.S. Federal Transit Administration (FTA) U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission U.S. Pentagon World Bank World Nuclear Association To see a report overview please email Sara Peerun on sara.peerun@visiongain.com

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