Public Health Pest Management Section

Raleigh, NC, United States

Public Health Pest Management Section

Raleigh, NC, United States
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Sultana H.,Old Dominion University | Patel U.,Old Dominion University | Toliver M.,Public Health Pest Management Section | Maggi R.G.,North Carolina State University | Neelakanta G.,Old Dominion University
Ticks and Tick-borne Diseases | Year: 2016

Salp15, a 15-kDa salivary gland protein plays an important role in tick blood-feeding and transmission of Borrelia burgdorferi, the causative agent of Lyme borreliosis. The comparative studies reveal that Salp15 is a genetically conserved protein across various Ixodes species. In this study, we have identified a Salp15 homolog, designated as Iaff15, from Ixodes affinis ticks that are the principal enzootic vectors of B. burgdorferi sensu stricto in the southeastern part of the United States. Comparison of the annotated amino acid sequences showed that Iaff15 share 81% homology with I. sinensis Salp15 homolog and 64% homology with I. scapularis Salp15. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that Iaff15 come within the same clade with I. sinensis, I. scapularis, and I. pacificus Salp15 homologs. The bioinformatics analysis of the posttranslational modifications prediction revealed that all the Salp15 family members contain glycosylation sites. In addition, Iaff15 carried a higher number of Casein Kinase II phosphorylation sites in comparison to the other Salp15 family members. Collectively, high sequence conservation distributed over the entire amino acids sequence not only suggests an important role for Iaff15 in I. affinis blood feeding and vector-pathogen interactions but may also lead to the development of an anti-vector vaccine against this group of ticks. © 2015 Elsevier GmbH.


Goddard J.,Mississippi State University | Harrison B.A.,Public Health Pest Management Section
Journal of Vector Ecology | Year: 2010

There has been no previous systematic statewide study of mosquitoes in Mississippi. This survey, resulting in the collection of over 400,000 specimens, was conducted by the authors from 2003 to 2007 throughout much of the state using CO2-baited CDC light traps and larval dipping. In addition, a health department contract mosquito surveillance technician collected several thousand specimens from the state from 2001 to 2003. Lastly, specimens housed at the Mississippi State University Entomological Museum, obtained from previous surveys, were included as vouchers for species occurring in the state. The collection records and literature show 60 species as occurring or having occurred in Mississippi. Voucher specimens representing 57 of the 60 species discussed are deposited in the Mississippi Entomological Museum or in the U.S. National Museum of Natural History (USNM), Washington, D.C.


Sultana H.,Old Dominion University | Patel U.,Old Dominion University | Toliver M.,Public Health Pest Management Section | Maggi R.G.,North Carolina State University | Neelakanta G.,Old Dominion University
Ticks and Tick-borne Diseases | Year: 2015

Salp15, a 15-kDa salivary gland protein plays an important role in tick blood-feeding and transmission of Borrelia burgdorferi, the causative agent of Lyme borreliosis. The comparative studies reveal that Salp15 is a genetically conserved protein across various Ixodes species. In this study, we have identified a Salp15 homolog, designated as Iaff15, from Ixodes affinis ticks that are the principal enzootic vectors of B. burgdorferi sensu stricto in the southeastern part of the United States. Comparison of the annotated amino acid sequences showed that Iaff15 share 81% homology with I. sinensis Salp15 homolog and 64% homology with I. scapularis Salp15. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that Iaff15 come within the same clade with I. sinensis, I. scapularis, and I. pacificus Salp15 homologs. The bioinformatics analysis of the posttranslational modifications prediction revealed that all the Salp15 family members contain glycosylation sites. In addition, Iaff15 carried a higher number of Casein Kinase II phosphorylation sites in comparison to the other Salp15 family members. Collectively, high sequence conservation distributed over the entire amino acids sequence not only suggests an important role for Iaff15 in I. affinis blood feeding and vector-pathogen interactions but may also lead to the development of an anti-vector vaccine against this group of ticks. © 2015 Elsevier GmbH.


PubMed | Public Health Pest Management Section, North Carolina State University and Old Dominion University
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Ticks and tick-borne diseases | Year: 2015

Salp15, a 15-kDa salivary gland protein plays an important role in tick blood-feeding and transmission of Borrelia burgdorferi, the causative agent of Lyme borreliosis. The comparative studies reveal that Salp15 is a genetically conserved protein across various Ixodes species. In this study, we have identified a Salp15 homolog, designated as Iaff15, from Ixodes affinis ticks that are the principal enzootic vectors of B. burgdorferi sensu stricto in the southeastern part of the United States. Comparison of the annotated amino acid sequences showed that Iaff15 share 81% homology with I. sinensis Salp15 homolog and 64% homology with I. scapularis Salp15. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that Iaff15 come within the same clade with I. sinensis, I. scapularis, and I. pacificus Salp15 homologs. The bioinformatics analysis of the posttranslational modifications prediction revealed that all the Salp15 family members contain glycosylation sites. In addition, Iaff15 carried a higher number of Casein Kinase II phosphorylation sites in comparison to the other Salp15 family members. Collectively, high sequence conservation distributed over the entire amino acids sequence not only suggests an important role for Iaff15 in I. affinis blood feeding and vector-pathogen interactions but may also lead to the development of an anti-vector vaccine against this group of ticks.


Maggi R.G.,North Carolina State University | Reichelt S.,North Carolina State University | Toliver M.,Public Health Pest Management Section | Engber B.,Public Health Pest Management Section
Ticks and Tick-borne Diseases | Year: 2010

Ixodes affinis and I. scapularis are tick species that are widely distributed in the coastal plain region of North Carolina. Both tick species are considered enzootic vectors for spirochetal bacteria of the genus Borrelia and specifically for B. burgdorferi s.s., the pathogen most often attributed as the cause of Lyme disease in the USA. Laboratory testing of individual I. affinis and I. scapularis ticks for the presence of Borrelia DNA was accomplished by PCR, targeting 2 regions of the 16S-23S intergenic spacer. In I. affinis, Borrelia DNA was detected in 63.2% of 155 individual ticks. B. burgdorferi s.s. and B. bissettii were identified by DNA sequencing in 33.5% and 27.9% I. affinis, respectively. Statistical differences were found for sex distribution of Borrelia DNA between I. affinis females (76.8%) and I. affinis males (55.6%) where B. burgdorferi s.s. was more prevalent in females (44.6%) than in males (27.3%). In I. scapularis, 298 individually tested ticks yielded no Borrelia PCR-positive results. This study found a higher incidence of Borrelia spp. in I. affinis collected in coastal North Carolina as compared to previous reports for this tick species in other Southern states, highlighting the potential importance of I. affinis in the maintenance of the enzootic transmission cycle of B. burgdorferi s.l. in North Carolina. The lack of Borrelia DNA in I. scapularis highlights the need for additional studies to better define the transmission cycle for B. burgdorferi s.s. in the southeastern USA and specifically in the state of North Carolina. © 2010 Elsevier GmbH.

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