Scottish Public Health Observatory

Edinburgh, United Kingdom

Scottish Public Health Observatory

Edinburgh, United Kingdom
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Lawder R.,Scottish Public Health Observatory | Grant I.,Scottish Public Health Observatory | Storey C.,Scottish Public Health Observatory | Walsh D.,Glasgow Center for Population Health | And 2 more authors.
Public Health | Year: 2011

Objective: To examine a broad range of risk factors and their association with alcohol-related hospital admissions in a Scottish general population. Design: Observational record-linkage study in Scotland from 1998 to 2008 involving 8305 respondents aged 16-74 years who participated in the 1998 Scottish Health Survey. Outcome was defined as first-time hospital admission with at least one alcohol-related diagnosis. Methods: Cox proportional hazards modelling was applied to estimate the hazard ratio (HR) of first-time hospitalization with an alcohol-related condition associated with a range of behavioural, social and biological risk factors. Findings: In total, 287 (3.4%) respondents experienced at least one alcohol-related hospitalization during the observation period. Moderate to excessive drinking was the strongest predictor of subsequent admission to hospital with an alcohol-related diagnosis, with clear evidence of a dose - response relationship. Moderate and heavy smoking were also significant predictors of subsequent admission to hospital with an alcohol-related problem. Social factors - such as being in receipt of income-related benefits [HR 1.68, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.25-2.28]; being retired or economically inactive; and being separated, divorced or widowed (HR 2.34, 95% CI 1.70-3.22) - were also significant predictors of alcohol-related hospitalization. Conclusions: Moderate and higher levels of weekly alcohol consumption, moderate to heavy smoking, economic circumstances and marital status are the main risk factors for alcohol-related hospitalization in the Scottish population. These findings add to the evidence that population-based strategies are needed to limit alcohol-related morbidity. © 2011.


Hill A.,Oxford Business Park | Balanda K.,Ireland and Northern Irelands Population Health Observatory | Galbraith L.,Scottish Public Health Observatory | Greenacre J.,Public Health Wales Observatory | Sinclair D.,Oxford Business Park
Public Health | Year: 2010

The technique of describing health using a range of measures has been termed 'health profiling'. This article discusses the emergence of health profiling in the UK and Ireland over recent years, led by the public health observatories (PHOs). The steps in developing health profiles are described, including defining the purpose, consulting users, choosing indicators, establishing the methods of presentation, disseminating and evaluating. Health profiles have developed and improved through collaboration between the PHOs in the UK and Ireland. Looking to the future, the PHOs are developing inter-related health profiles ranging from small area to European regions, enhanced and informed by the addition of themed profiles for different population groups, lifestyles and diseases. © 2010 The Royal Society for Public Health.


PubMed | Scottish Public Health Observatory
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Public health | Year: 2011

To examine a broad range of risk factors and their association with alcohol-related hospital admissions in a Scottish general population.Observational record-linkage study in Scotland from 1998 to 2008 involving 8305 respondents aged 16-74 years who participated in the 1998 Scottish Health Survey. Outcome was defined as first-time hospital admission with at least one alcohol-related diagnosis.Cox proportional hazards modelling was applied to estimate the hazard ratio (HR) of first-time hospitalization with an alcohol-related condition associated with a range of behavioural, social and biological risk factors.In total, 287 (3.4%) respondents experienced at least one alcohol-related hospitalization during the observation period. Moderate to excessive drinking was the strongest predictor of subsequent admission to hospital with an alcohol-related diagnosis, with clear evidence of a dose - response relationship. Moderate and heavy smoking were also significant predictors of subsequent admission to hospital with an alcohol-related problem. Social factors - such as being in receipt of income-related benefits [HR 1.68, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.25-2.28]; being retired or economically inactive; and being separated, divorced or widowed (HR 2.34, 95% CI 1.70-3.22) - were also significant predictors of alcohol-related hospitalization.Moderate and higher levels of weekly alcohol consumption, moderate to heavy smoking, economic circumstances and marital status are the main risk factors for alcohol-related hospitalization in the Scottish population. These findings add to the evidence that population-based strategies are needed to limit alcohol-related morbidity.

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