Helsinki, Finland
Helsinki, Finland

Time filter

Source Type

Scifo E.,University of Helsinki | Szwajda A.,University of Helsinki | Debski J.,Polish Academy of Sciences | Uusi-Rauva K.,Folkhalsan Institute of Genetics | And 12 more authors.
Journal of Proteome Research | Year: 2013

Neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses (NCL) are the most common inherited progressive encephalopathies of childhood. One of the most prevalent forms of NCL, Juvenile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (JNCL) or CLN3 disease (OMIM: 204200), is caused by mutations in the CLN3 gene on chromosome 16p12.1. Despite progress in the NCL field, the primary function of ceroid-lipofuscinosis neuronal protein 3 (CLN3) remains elusive. In this study, we aimed to clarify the role of human CLN3 in the brain by identifying CLN3-associated proteins using a Tandem Affinity Purification coupled to Mass Spectrometry (TAP-MS) strategy combined with Significance Analysis of Interactome (SAINT). Human SH-SY5Y-NTAP-CLN3 stable cells were used to isolate native protein complexes for subsequent TAP-MS. Bioinformatic analyses of isolated complexes yielded 58 CLN3 interacting partners (IP) including 42 novel CLN3 IP, as well as 16 CLN3 high confidence interacting partners (HCIP) previously identified in another high-throughput study by Behrends et al., 2010. Moreover, 31 IP of ceroid-lipofuscinosis neuronal protein 5 (CLN5) were identified (18 of which were in common with the CLN3 bait). Our findings support previously suggested involvement of CLN3 in transmembrane transport, lipid homeostasis and neuronal excitability, as well as link it to G-protein signaling and protein folding/sorting in the ER. © 2013 American Chemical Society.


Kristiansson K.,Public Health Genomics Unit | Kristiansson K.,Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland FIMM | Kristiansson K.,University of Helsinki | Perola M.,Public Health Genomics Unit | And 50 more authors.
Circulation: Cardiovascular Genetics | Year: 2012

Background-Genome-wide association (GWA) studies have identified several susceptibility loci for metabolic syndrome (MetS) component traits, but have had variable success in identifying susceptibility loci to the syndrome as an entity. We conducted a GWA study on MetS and its component traits in 4 Finnish cohorts consisting of 2637 MetS cases and 7927 controls, both free of diabetes, and followed the top loci in an independent sample with transcriptome and nuclear magnetic resonance-based metabonomics data. Furthermore, we tested for loci associated with multiple MetS component traits using factor analysis, and built a genetic risk score for MetS. Methods and Results-A previously known lipid locus, APOA1/C3/A4/A5 gene cluster region (SNP rs964184), was associated with MetS in all 4 study samples (P=7.23×10-9 in meta-analysis). The association was further supported by serum metabolite analysis, where rs964184 was associated with various very low density lipoprotein, triglyceride, and high-density lipoprotein metabolites (P=0.024 -1.88×10-5). Twenty-two previously identified susceptibility loci for individual MetS component traits were replicated in our GWA and factor analysis. Most of these were associated with lipid phenotypes, and none with 2 or more uncorrelated MetS components. A genetic risk score, calculated as the number of risk alleles in loci associated with individual MetS traits, was strongly associated with MetS status. Conclusions-Our findings suggest that genes from lipid metabolism pathways have the key role in the genetic background of MetS. We found little evidence for pleiotropy linking dyslipidemia and obesity to the other MetS component traits, such as hypertension and glucose intolerance. © 2012 American Heart Association, Inc.

Loading Public Health Genomics Unit collaborators
Loading Public Health Genomics Unit collaborators