Public Health Command Region Pacific

Zama, Japan

Public Health Command Region Pacific

Zama, Japan
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PubMed | Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Kosin University, Incheon National University, Armed Forces Research Institute of Medical science and 3 more.
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Military medicine | Year: 2015

A total of 150,805 culicine female mosquitoes were captured by Mosquito Magnet, black light, and New Jersey light traps, and at resting collections in the Republic of Korea from 2008 to 2010 as part of the U.S. Forces Korea malaria and Japanese surveillance programs. Mosquitoes were identified and culicine mosquitoes placed in pools of up to 30 mosquitoes each, by species and date of collection, and screened for flaviviruses using a reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction assay. A total of 98/6,845 (1.4%) pools were positive by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction for Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV). A total of 92/2,031 (4.5%) pools of Culex tritaeniorhynchus were positive for JEV and accounted for 93.9% (92/98) of all JEV positive pools. A total of 4/804 (0.5%) and 2/175 (1.1%) pools of C. pipiens and C. bitaeniorhynchus, respectively, were positive for JEV. The JEV maximum likelihood estimations (estimated number of viral RNA positive mosquitoes per 1,000) for C. tritaeniorhynchus, C. bitaeniorhynchus, and C. pipiens were 1.71, 1.02, and 0.36 respectively. JEV is a severe health threat for local populations and of significant concern for nonimmune (unvaccinated) U.S. soldiers, civilians, and family members deployed to the Republic of Korea.


Harrison G.F.,U.S. Army | Foley D.H.,U.S. Army | Rueda L.M.,U.S. Army | Melanson V.R.,U.S. Army | And 7 more authors.
American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene | Year: 2013

The Malaria Research and Reference Reagent Resource-recommended PLF/UNR/VIR polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to detect Plasmodium vivax in Anopheles spp. mosquitoes collected in South Korea. Samples that were amplified were sequenced and compared with known Plasmodium spp. by using the PlasmoDB.org Basic Local Alignment Search Tool/n and the National Center for Biotechnology Information Basic Local Alignment Search Tool/n tools. Results show that the primers PLF/UNR/VIR used in this PCR can produce uninterpretable results and non-specific sequences in field-collected mosquitoes. Three additional PCRs (PLU/VIV, specific for 18S small subunit ribosomal DNA; Pvr47, specific for a nuclear repeat; and GDCW/PLAS, specific for the mitochondrial marker, cytB) were then used to find a more accurate and interpretable assay. Samples that were amplified were again sequenced. The PLU/VIV and Pvr47 assays showed cross-reactivity with non-Plasmodium spp. and an arthropod fungus (Zoophthora lanceolata). The GDCW/PLAS assay amplified only Plasmodium spp. but also amplified the non-human specific parasite P. berghei from an Anopheles belenrae mosquito. Detection of P. berghei in South Korea is a new finding. Copyright © 2013 by The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.


Bellis G.,Fisheries and Forestry | Kim H.-C.,5th Medical Detachment | Kim M.-S.,5th Medical Detachment | Kim M.-S.,Animal and Plant Quarantine Agency | And 5 more authors.
Zootaxa | Year: 2013

Light trap surveys of adult Culicoides Latreille in the Republic of Korea (ROK) resulted in the capture of three previously unreported species, C. nasuensis Kitaoka, C. pallidulus Yu and C. jacobsoni Macfie. These new records are supported by supplementary morphological descriptions and DNA barcodes (mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I or COI). An updated checklist of species reported from the ROK is provided. © 2013 Magnolia Press.


Kim H.C.,5th Medical Detachment | Bellis G.A.,Fisheries and Forestry | Kim M.-S.,Animal and Plant Quarantine Agency | Klein T.A.,Public Health Command Region Pacific | And 2 more authors.
Korean Journal of Parasitology | Year: 2014

Biting midges (Culicoides: Ceratopogonidae) were collected by Mosquito Magnet® traps at the Neutral Nations Supervisory Commission (NNSC) camp and Daeseongdong village inside the demilitarized zone (DMZ) and near the military demarcation line (MDL) separating North and South Korea and at Warrior Base (US Army training site) and Tongilchon 3 km south of the DMZ in northern Gyeonggi Province, Republic of Korea (ROK), from May-October 2010-2012, to determine their seasonal distributions. A total of 18,647 Culicoides females (18,399; 98.7%) and males (248; 1.3%) comprising 16 species were collected. Overall, the most commonly collected species was Culicoides nipponensis (42.9%), followed by C. erairai (29.2%), C. punctatus (20.3%), C. arakawae (3.3%), C. pallidulus (1.8%), and C. circumscriptus (1.4%), while the remaining 10 species accounted for only 1.1% of all Culicoides spp. collected. The seasonal distribution of C. nippo-nensis was bimodal, with high numbers collected during May-June and again during September. C. erairai was more frequently collected during June-July, followed by sharply decreased populations from August-October. C. punctatus was collected in low numbers from May-September with high numbers collected during October. C. erairai was predominantly collected from the NNSC camp (85.1% of all C. erairai collected) located adjacent to the MDL at Panmunjeom in the northernmost part of Gyeonggi-do (Province), while other sites yielded low numbers of specimens. © 2014, Korean Society for Parasitology and Tropical Medicine.


Kim B.-J.,National Institute of Ecology | Kim H.,Seoul National University | Won S.,Seoul National University | Kim H.-C.,35th Medical Detachment | And 6 more authors.
Korean Journal of Parasitology | Year: 2014

Ticks were collected from 35 animals from 5 provinces and 3 metropolitan cities during 2012. Ticks also were collected by tick drag from 4 sites in Gyeonggi-do (2) and Jeollabuk-do (2) Provinces. A total of 612 ticks belonging to 6 species and 3 genera were collected from mammals and a bird (n=573) and by tick drag (n=39). Haemaphyalis longicornis (n=434) was the most commonly collected tick, followed by H. flava (158), Ixodes nipponensis (11), Amblyomma testudinarium (7), H. japonica (1), and H. formosensis (1). H. longicornis and H. flava were collected from all animal hosts examined. For animal hosts (n>1), the highest Tick Index (TI) was observed for domestic dogs (29.6), followed by Siberian roe deer (17.4), water deer (14.4), and raccoon dogs (1.3). A total of 402 H. longicornis (adults 86, 21.4%; nymphs 160, 39.8%; larvae 156, 38.9%) were collected from wild and domestic animals. A total of 158 H. flava (n=158) were collected from wild and domestic animals and 1 ring-necked pheasant, with a higher proportion of adults (103, 65.2%), while nymphs and larvae only accounted for 12.7% (20) and 22.2% (35), respectively. Only 7 A. testudinarium were collected from the wild boar (6 adults) and Eurasian badger (1 nymph), while only 5 I. nipponensis were collected from the water deer (4 adults) and a raccoon dog (1 adult). One adult female H. formosensis was first collected from vegetation by tick drag from Mara Island, Seogwipo-si, Jeju-do Province. © 2014, Korean Society for Parasitology and Tropical Medicine.


Noh J.Y.,Korea University | Cheong H.J.,Korea University | Song J.Y.,Korea University | Kim W.J.,Korea University | And 8 more authors.
Journal of Clinical Virology | Year: 2013

Background: Laboratory diagnosis of hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS), an infectious disease caused by rodent-borne hantaviruses in Asia and Europe, depends primarily on serological methods. Since the advent of such serodiagnostic tests, few reports are available about the clinical and molecular epidemiological features of HFRS. Objectives: To investigate the epidemioclinical features of HFRS patients treated at a tertiary-care teaching hospital in Seoul over a 10-year period. Study design: Medical records of HFRS patients, admitted to a tertiary-care teaching hospital during February 2002 to February 2012, were reviewed. Sera from patients were tested for Hantaan virus (HTNV) and Seoul virus (SEOV) RNA using RT-PCR. Results: Among 35 HFRS patients (mean age was 44.2. ±. 14.7 years), 29 were male (82.9%). Acute renal failure developed in 27 patients (77.1%), and 12 patients (34.3%) were admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU). Conjunctival injection (OR 10.32, 95% CI 1.09-97.77, P = .04) and initial serum albumin less than 3. g/dL (OR 22.83, 95% CI 1.45-359.93, P = .03) were risk factors for ICU admission. Of 35 acute-phase sera, 11 (31.4%) were positive for HTNV RNA. None were positive for SEOV RNA. Conclusions: HFRS was characterized by the clinical triad of fever, renal insufficiency and gastrointestinal symptoms. Conjunctival injection and serum albumin level were related to severity. A large-scale multi-center study is needed to enhance insights into epidemioclinical characteristics of HFRS in Korea. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.


Kim B.-J.,Seoul National University | Kim S.-J.,Seoul National University | Kang J.-G.,Seoul National University | Ko S.,Seoul National University | And 8 more authors.
Vector-Borne and Zoonotic Diseases | Year: 2013

Rodents and soricomorphs are animal hosts of fleas and associated zoonotic microbial pathogens. A total of 4,889 small mammals were collected from Gyeonggi and Gangwon Provinces, Republic of Korea, from 2008 through 2010, including: Apodemus agrarius (4,122, 84.3%), followed by Crocidura lasiura (282, 5.8%), Microtus fortis (257, 5.3%), Myodes regulus (77, 1.6%), Micromys minutus (71, 1.5%), Mus musculus (63, 1.3%), and 4 other species (17, 0.3%). A total of 1,099 fleas belonging to 10 species and 7 genera were collected. Ctenophthalmus congeneroides (724, 65.9%) was the most commonly collected flea, followed by Stenoponia sidimi (301, 27.4%), Neopsylla bidentatiformis (29, 2.6%), and Rhadinopsylla insolita (25, 2.3%). The remaining species accounted for only 1.8% (20, range 1-6) of all fleas collected. The 2 dominant flea species, C. congeneroides and S. sidimi, showed an inverse seasonal pattern, with higher populations of C. congeneroides from January-September, whereas S. sidimi was more frequently collected during October-December. The overall flea infestation rates (FIR) and flea indices (FI) were 14.1% and 0.22, respectively, and were highest during April-June (19.7% and 0.30, respectively). A total of 735 of the 1,099 fleas were assayed for the detection of Bartonella spp. by PCR using Bartonella-specific primers, of which 515 were positive for Bartonella, with an overall maximum likelihood estimate (MLE) of 700.7/1,000. The highest MLE values were observed during April-June (899.2) and July-September (936.2) trapping periods and, although lower, were similar for January-March (566.7) and October-December (574.1). C. congeneroides demonstrated high MLEs for all seasons (range 752.5-934.8), while S. sidimi was positive for Bartonella only during January-March (MLE=342.1) and October-December (MLE=497.2) collection periods. Continued long-term surveillance of small mammals and associated ectoparasites is needed to improve our understanding of the prevalence of Bartonella spp. in fleas and the role of fleas in the zoonotic maintenance and transmission of Bartonella to humans. © 2013, Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.


PubMed | Public Health Command Region Pacific, National Institute of Ecology, National Institute of Biological Resources, th Medical Detachment and Seoul National University
Type: Journal Article | Journal: The Korean journal of parasitology | Year: 2014

Ticks were collected from 35 animals from 5 provinces and 3 metropolitan cities during 2012. Ticks also were collected by tick drag from 4 sites in Gyeonggi-do (2) and Jeollabuk-do (2) Provinces. A total of 612 ticks belonging to 6 species and 3 genera were collected from mammals and a bird (n=573) and by tick drag (n=39). Haemaphyalis longicornis (n=434) was the most commonly collected tick, followed by H. flava (158), Ixodes nipponensis (11), Amblyomma testudinarium (7), H. japonica (1), and H. formosensis (1). H. longicornis and H. flava were collected from all animal hosts examined. For animal hosts (n>1), the highest Tick Index (TI) was observed for domestic dogs (29.6), followed by Siberian roe deer (17.4), water deer (14.4), and raccoon dogs (1.3). A total of 402 H. longicornis (adults 86, 21.4%; nymphs 160, 39.8%; larvae 156, 38.9%) were collected from wild and domestic animals. A total of 158 H. flava (n=158) were collected from wild and domestic animals and 1 ring-necked pheasant, with a higher proportion of adults (103, 65.2%), while nymphs and larvae only accounted for 12.7% (20) and 22.2% (35), respectively. Only 7 A. testudinarium were collected from the wild boar (6 adults) and Eurasian badger (1 nymph), while only 5 I. nipponensis were collected from the water deer (4 adults) and a raccoon dog (1 adult). One adult female H. formosensis was first collected from vegetation by tick drag from Mara Island, Seogwipo-si, Jeju-do Province.


Lee J.G.,Korea University | Gu S.H.,Korea University | Baek L.J.,Korea University | Shin O.S.,Korea University | And 5 more authors.
Viruses | Year: 2014

The genome of Muju virus (MUJV), identified originally in the royal vole (Myodes regulus) in Korea, was fully sequenced to ascertain its genetic and phylogenetic relationship with Puumala virus (PUUV), harbored by the bank vole (My. glareolus), and a PUUV-like virus, named Hokkaido virus (HOKV), in the grey red-backed vole (My. rufocanus) in Japan. Whole genome sequence analysis of the 6544-nucleotide large (L), 3652-nucleotide medium (M) and 1831-nucleotide small (S) segments of MUJV, as well as the amino acid sequences of their gene products, indicated that MUJV strains from different capture sites might represent genetic variants of PUUV, the prototype arvicolid rodent-borne hantavirus in Europe. Distinct geographic-specific clustering of MUJV was found in different provinces in Korea, and phylogenetic analyses revealed that MUJV and HOKV share a common ancestry with PUUV. A better understanding of the taxonomic classification and pathogenic potential of MUJV must await its isolation in cell culture. © 2014 by the authors.


Shin S.-H.,Konkuk University | Seo H.-J.,Konkuk University | Seo H.-J.,Animal and Plant Quarantine Agency | Choi Y.-J.,Konkuk University | And 7 more authors.
Experimental and Applied Acarology | Year: 2013

A total of 1,305 ticks were collected from wild rodents captured monthly, except July and August, during 2008 at three US-ROK operated military training sites and three US military installations in Gyeonggi and Gangwon Provinces, the Republic of Korea (ROK). Ixodes nipponensis was the most frequently collected tick (n = 1,299, 99.5 %), followed by Ixodes pomerantzevi (n = 6, 0.5 %). The ticks were pooled (1-15/sample) and tested by nested polymerase chain reaction (nPCR) for spotted fever group (SFG) rickettsiae with primer sets targeting the outer membrane protein B (ompB), citrate synthase (gltA), and 17-kDa antigen gene loci. A total of 115/197 (58.4 %) pools were positive by nPCR for the outer membrane protein ompB. Nucleotide sequence analysis of 105/115 (91.3 %) ompB targeted nPCR positive products showed a high degree of similarity to Rickettsia monacensis (99.3-100 %, n = 87) and R. japonica (99.5-100 %, n = 18). From the 87 positive samples demonstrating a high degree of similarity to R. monacensis, 15 were selected and analyzed by nPCR for gltA and the 17-kDa genes. A total of 12/15 pooled samples were positive for by nPCR for gltA, with amplicons demonstrating a high degree of similarity to R. monacensis (99.3-99.7 %). A total of 13/15 pooled samples were positive by nPCR for the 17-kDa gene, with amplicons demonstrating a high degree of similarity to R. monacensis (99.4-100 %). These findings demonstrate that R. monacensis is distributed throughout Gyeonggi and Gangwon Provinces in the ROK. Furthermore, data suggest a relative high prevalence of R. monacensis in the tick, I. nipponensis. © 2013 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht.

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