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Corvera de Asturias, Spain

Petersen G.M.,Rochester College | Amundadottir L.,U.S. National Institutes of Health | Fuchs C.S.,Dana-Farber Cancer Institute | Fuchs C.S.,Harvard University | And 83 more authors.
Nature Genetics

We conducted a genome-wide association study of pancreatic cancer in 3,851 affected individuals (cases) and 3,934 unaffected controls drawn from 12 prospective cohort studies and 8 case-control studies. Based on a logistic regression model for genotype trend effect that was adjusted for study, age, sex, self-described ancestry and five principal components, we identified eight SNPs that map to three loci on chromosomes 13q22.1 1q32.1 and 5p15.33. Two correlated SNPs, rs9543325 (P = 3.27 × 10 11, per-allele odds ratio (OR) 1.26, 95% CI 1.18-1.35) and rs9564966 (P = 5.86 × 10 8, per-allele OR 1.21, 95% CI 1.13-1.30), map to a nongenic region on chromosome 13q22.1. Five SNPs on 1q32.1 map to NR5A2, and the strongest signal was at rs3790844 (P = 2.45 × 10 10, per-allele OR 0.77, 95% CI 0.71-0.84). A single SNP, rs401681 (P = 3.66 × 10 7, per-allele OR 1.19, 95% CI 1.11-1.27), maps to the CLPTM1L-TERT locus on 5p15.33, which is associated with multiple cancers. Our study has identified common susceptibility loci for pancreatic cancer that warrant follow-up studies. © 2010 Nature America, Inc. All rights reserved. Source

Price A.J.,University of Oxford | Allen N.E.,University of Oxford | Appleby P.N.,University of Oxford | Crowe F.L.,University of Oxford | And 39 more authors.
Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention

Background: High circulating insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) concentrations have been associated with increased risk for prostate cancer in several prospective epidemiological studies. In this study, we investigate the association between circulating IGF-I concentration and risk of prostate cancer over the long term in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study. Methods: In a nested case-control design, 1,542 incident prostate cancer cases from eight European countries were individually matched to 1,542 controls by study center, age at recruitment, duration of follow-up, time of day, and duration of fasting at blood collection. Conditional logistic regression models were used to calculate risk for prostate cancer associated with IGF-I concentration, overall and by various subgroups. Results: Circulating IGF-I concentration was associated with a significant increased risk for prostate cancer [OR for highest vs. lowest quartile, 1.69; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.35-2.13; Ptrend = 0.0002]. This positive association did not differ according to duration of follow-up [ORs for highest vs. lowest quartile were 2.01 (1.35-2.99), 1.37 (0.94-2.00), and 1.80 (1.17-2.77) for cancers diagnosed <4, 4-7, and >7 years after blood collection, respectively (Pheterogeneity = 0.77)] or by stage, grade, and age at diagnosis or age at blood collection (all subgroups Pheterogeneity >0.05). Conclusion: In this European population, high circulating IGF-I concentration is positively associated with risk for prostate cancer over the short and long term. Impact: As IGF-I is the only potentially modifiable risk factor so far identified, research into the effects of reducing circulating IGF-I levels on subsequent prostate cancer risk is warranted. ©2012 AACR. Source

Hoggart C.,Imperial College London | Brennan P.,International Agency for Research on Cancer IARC | Tjonneland A.,Danish Cancer Society | Vogel U.,Helmholtz Center Munich | And 35 more authors.
Cancer Prevention Research

Risk models for lung cancer incidence would be useful for prioritizing individuals for screening and participation in clinical trials of chemoprevention. We present a risk model for lung cancer built using prospective cohort data from a general population which predicts individual incidence in a given time period. We build separate risk models for current and former smokers using 169,035 ever smokers from the multicenter European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) and considered a model for never smokers. The data set was split into independent training and test sets. Lung cancer incidence was modeled using survival analysis, stratifying by age started smoking, and for former smokers, also smoking duration. Other risk factors considered were smoking intensity, 10 occupational/environmental exposures previously implicated with lung cancer, and single-nucleotide polymorphisms at two loci identified by genome-wide association studies of lung cancer. Individual risk in the test set was measured by the predicted probability of lung cancer incidence in the year preceding last follow-up time, predictive accuracy was measured by the area under the receiver operator characteristic curve (AUC). Using smoking information alone gave good predictive accuracy: the AUC and 95% confidence interval in ever smokers was 0.843 (0.810-0.875), the Bach model applied to the same data gave an AUC of 0.775 (0.737-0.813). Other risk factors had negligible effect on the AUC, including never smokers forwhomprediction was poor. Our model is generalizable and straightforward to implement. Its accuracy can be attributed to its modeling of lifetime exposure to smoking. ©2012 AACR. Source

Michaud D.S.,Brown University | Michaud D.S.,Imperial College London | Izard J.,Forsyth Institute | Izard J.,Harvard University | And 50 more authors.

Objective: Examine the relationship between antibodies to 25 oral bacteria and pancreatic cancer risk in a prospective cohort study. Design We measured antibodies to oral bacteria in prediagnosis blood samples from 405 pancreatic cancer cases and 416 matched controls, nested within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition study. Analyses were conducted using conditional logistic regression and additionally adjusted for smoking status and body mass index. Results: Individuals with high levels of antibodies against Porphyromonas gingivalis ATTC 53978, a pathogenic periodontal bacteria, had a twofold higher risk of pancreatic cancer than individuals with lower levels of these antibodies (OR 2.14; 95% CI 1.05 to 4.36; >200 ng/ml vs ≤200 ng/ml). To explore the association with commensal (non-pathogenic) oral bacteria, we performed a cluster analysis and identified two groups of individuals, based on their antibody profiles. A cluster with overall higher levels of antibodies had a 45% lower risk of pancreatic cancer than a cluster with overall lower levels of antibodies (OR 0.55; 95% CI 0.36 to 0.83). Conclusions: Periodontal disease might increase the risk for pancreatic cancer. Moreover, increased levels of antibodies against specific commensal oral bacteria, which can inhibit growth of pathogenic bacteria, might reduce the risk of pancreatic cancer. Studies are needed to determine whether oral bacteria have direct effects on pancreatic cancer pathogenesis or serve as markers of the immune response. Source

Aleksandrova K.,German Institute of Human Nutrition | Boeing H.,German Institute of Human Nutrition | Jenab M.,International Agency for Research on Cancer | Bueno-de-Mesquita H.B,University Utrecht | And 47 more authors.

Adiponectin-an adipose tissue-derived protein-may provide a molecular link between obesity and colorectal cancer (CRC), but evidence from large prospective studies is limited. In particular, no epidemiological study explored high-molecular weight (HMW) and non-HMW adiponectin fractions in relation to CRC risk, despite them being hypothesized to have differential biological activities, i.e. regulating insulin sensitivity (HMW adiponectin) versus inflammatory response (non-HMW adiponectin). In a prospective, nested case-control study, we investigated whether prediagnostic serum concentrations of total, HMW and non-HMW adiponectin are associated with risk of CRC, independent of obesity and other known CRC risk factors. A total of 1206 incident cases (755 colon and 451 rectal) were matched to 1206 controls using incidence-density sampling. In conditional logistic regression, adjusted for dietary and lifestyle factors, total adiponectin and non-HMW adiponectin concentrations were inversely associated with risk of CRC [relative risk (RR) comparing highest versus lowest quintile = 0.71, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.53-0.95, P trend = 0.03 for total adiponectin and RR = 0.45, 95% CI = 0.34-0.61, P trend < 0.0001 for non-HMW adiponectin]. HMW adiponectin concentrations were not associated with CRC risk (RR = 0.91, 95% CI = 0.68-1.22, P trend = 0.55). Non-HMW adiponectin was associated with CRC risk even after adjustment for body mass index and waist circumference (RR = 0.39, 95% CI = 0.26-0.60, P trend < 0.0001), whereas the association with total adiponectin was no longer significant (RR = 0.81, 95% CI = 0.60-1.09, P trend = 0.23). When stratified by cancer site, non-HMW adiponectin was inversely associated with both colon and rectal cancer. These findings suggest an important role of the relative proportion of non-HMW adiponectin in CRC pathogenesis. Future studies are warranted to confirm these results and to elucidate the underlying mechanisms. © The Author 2012. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. Source

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